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ILLUSTRATED GUIDE 



IONAL MUSEUM 



IN NAPLES 




SANCTIONED BY THE 
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION 




RICHTER & CO, - NAPLES 

PUBLISHERS 



ILLUSTRATED GUIDE 



TO THE 



NATIONAL MUSEUM 
IN NAPLES 



EDITORS: 

G. DE PETRA, formerly Director of the Natio- 
nal Museum and professor at the University of 
Naples. A. SOGLIANO, Director of the Ex- 
cavations at Pompei and professor at the Univer- 
sity of Naples. G. PATRONI , Professor at 
the University of Pavie. L. MAR1ANI, Pro- 
fessor at the University of Pise. E. GABRICI, 
Director of the Coin Collection in the Natio- 
nal Museum. D. BASS1 , Director of the 
Collection of Papyri from Herculaneum. 
O. MARUCCHI, Director of the Egyptian Col- 
lection in the Vatican. A. CONT1, Director 
of the Picture Gallery in the National Museum. 



PUBLISHERS 

RICHTER & Co. 

NAPLES 



All rights reserved. 



. 



PREFATORY NOTE 



This guide book is, with the exception of those pages 
describing the Picture Gallery, an excerpt from the ency- 
clopaedic Guida Illustrata del Museo Nazionale di Na- 
poli, approvata dal Ministero della Pubblica Istruzione, 
compilata da D. Bassi, E. Gabrici, L. Mariani, O. Ma- 
rucchi, G. Patroni, G. de Petra, A. Sogliano, per cura di 
A. Ruesch . The numbers preceding the several descrip- 
tive notes are identical with those in the Italian work 
referred to above. In parenthesis are quoted in many cases 
the numbers affixed to the various objects on the occasion 
of a recent inventory. For literary references and further 
information the student is referred to the original Italian 
edition. 



..II..II.JI..II..II ' 



The National Museum. 



In the year 1738 the Bourbon King Charles of Naples conceived the 
idea of presenting the capital of his newly-acquired kingdom with a Mu- 
seum which should contain all the collected art treasures inherited under 
the Farnese bequest. At first the new building erected at Capo di Monte, 
afterwards used as the Royal residence, was selected; but, as fresh trea- 
sures continually came to light during the excavations of Herculaneum 
and Pompeii, it was decided to assemble all these collections, both old 
and new, under the same roof. For this purpose the house at the foot 
of the hill called Santa Teresa was chosen. It was erected in 1586, in- 
tended originally for the Royal Stables, but altered by the Viceroy Count 
Lemos (1599-1601) with the help of the architect Fontana into University 
buildings. As the seat of the University was now transferred to the Palace 
of the Jesuits (Gesii vecchiol the former stables stood empty and were 
available as a Museum. 

The gems in the various collections here exhibited belong almost 
exclusively to the Farnese bequest , the others have been added to a 
large extent either by purchase or through excavations in the Campanian 
towns. The bronzes on the other hand and the household utensils were 
found for the most part at Pompeii and Herculaneum as were the mosaics 
to which a considerable addition was made by the purchase of the Borgia 
Collection from Velletri in 1817. The papyri are all from Herculaneum. 

The nucleus of the picture gallery was formed by the pictures of the 
Farnese bequest sent from Parma to Naples. More were added from 
churches and sequestered monasteries while countless others came from 
the Borgia Collection at Velletri. A remarkable addition to this section 
was the bequest of the late Marchese del Vasto who left the magnificent 
tapestries depicting the Battle of Pavia to the Museum. 

The inscriptions placed in the vestibule, composed by Fiorelli, give 
a more complete history of the founding of the National Museum. 



Ground-floor 



The Marble Statues 

Most ol the marble statues in the National Museum originally came 
from Rome, where they had been the property ol the Farnese family, 
whose large collection of statues was acquired from excavations, espe- 
cially those of the year 1540, and was placed partly in the Palazzo Far- 
nese, partly in the Farnese Garden on the Palatine. When the family 
died out in 1731, the possessions of Elizabeth Farnese, including the col- 
lection, passed into the hands of her son Charles, King of Naples, and 
the statues were removed to that town. Those that had ornamented the 
Villa were also added to the Museum. Others of the statues originate 
from excavations made at different times in Campanian towns, especially 
at Pompeii, Herculaneum, Capua, Pozzuoli, Gaeta and so on, while others 
come from Locri. 

A small nucleus is formed by the Borgia collection which Giovanni 
Paolo Borgia had founded at Velletri in the eighteenth century and which 
chiefly contains objects from Oriental Greece, by the collection of the 
Duke of Noia and that of Caroline Murat. One part of this collection 
was not taken to France, but remained in Naples under the name of the 
Museo Palatino. Other statues have been acquired by purchase. 

The collection is placed on the ground floor. The entrance hall con- 
tains honorary statues. In the right wing the statues are arranged either 
from the chronological or from the topographical standpoint. In the left 
wing are the portrait statues. 

Vestibule. 
To the right : 

1 (6397). Statue of a woman in Ionic chiton and himation, the type 
being derived from Praxiteles. The arms, with the attributes of the muse 
Euterpe or Thalia, are restored. 

To the left : 

2 (6377). Statue of a woman in chiton and himation. The forearms, 
with the attributes of the muse Calliope, are restored. 

Entrance Hall. 

To the right and left of entrance : 

4, 5 (2400-2401). Two cipollino columns from the Triopeum at Rome, 
dedicated by Herodes Atticus to the gods of the Underworld. 

Left Corridor : 

6 (3614). Base, with dedication to the Consul L. Burbuleus Optatus 
by his children's nurse. 

7 (5960). Colossal statue in stage costume, transformed into a Urania 
by mistaken restoration of the head, and hands. The left hand probably 
held a cithara, the right a plectrum. 

8 (6787-6791). Cornice from the building of Eumachia in Pompeii. 

i) (1215-23). Base, with dedication to Aurelius Pylades, the pantomime 
actor. 

10, 11 (5!H, rj<);>2). Columns of Spanish Brocatell marble. 

13 (6866). Marble Basin, supported by three winged sphinxes. 



The Marble Statues 



Along the walls near the basin : 

14-17 (5965, 5966, 5970, 5969). Four Toga Statues of unknown muni- 
cipal officers. 

18 (6776). Sarcophagus. Bacchic procession, from left to right. In a 
chariot drawn by Centaurs is Dionysus, preceded by the Bacchic pro- 
cession in which the drunken Hercules figures. On the ground two 
mystic cistae, on the sides two griffins. Roman wholesale work. 




Fig. i. M. Nonius Balbus (Phot. Brogi). 

20 (6168). Statue of Vicirla, mother of M. Jun. Balbus, the praetor. 
It resembles the so-called Herculanensis major , now in Dresden. 

22 (6244). Statue of a daughter of Balbus. 

23 (6211). Equestrian statue of M. Nonius Balbus, the elder. From 
Herculaneum. The head and right hand are restored. (Fig. i). 

24 (6246). Toga statue. The head is antique, but does not belong to 
the body. 

27 (6248). Statue of a daughter of Balbus. She is arrayed like the 



Ground-floor 



Vienna statue of Kora by Praxiteles. Her head is bent and full of life 
as though she were about to speak. In the hair are traces of red colour 
as a ground for gilding. Careful execution. 

28 (6604,6605). Sarcophagus with cover in the middle of which is the 
tablet for the inscription. On the front of the sarcophagus are the por- 
traits of a man and woman, supported by three putti. Beneath these are 
garlands. 

29. Toga statue of a man sacrificing. 

30 (6394). Female statue, restored as Clio, with modern head. It re- 
calls the Praxitelean type of the so-called Herkulanensis minor now 
in Dresden. 

31 (6870). Marble Basin, made like a cylix with double handles. 

32 (6398). Female Statue, restored as Euterpe, perhaps the portrait 
of an empress in the dress of a priestess. The motive is reminiscent of 
the Demeter of Praxiteles. 

33, 34 (5973, 5974). Column* of black porphyry. 

36 (3255). Base, with dedication to the Emperor Antoninus Pius. 

37 (5975). Colossal statue of a Youth. Found in the Baths of Cara- 
calla. The hands and left leg are restorations. He probably held an at- 
tribute in the left hand and is clad in a girded tunic and short mantle. 
The boots are high and decorated with masks. Probably intended for a 
Genius, perhaps that of the Roman people. 

38 (121522). Base, with dedication to C. Aelius Quirinus Domitianus 
Gaurus. 

To the left of the main staircase : 

39 (5976). Colossal statue of a River God, leaning his left elbow on 
a she-wolf and holding a cornucopia in his right hand. The left hand 
and the wolf are restorations, so it is uncertain whether it is intended to 
represent the Tiber. 

40 (5977). Another similar statue. It is difficult to determine which 
river-god this represents, as the animal's head and the oar are resto- 
rations. 

Corridor to the right. 

41 (2405). Base with Greek inscription in honour of the pugilist De- 
metrius of Alexandria. 

42 (5978). Colossal Female Statue, found in the Baths of Caracalla 
and thought to be an lole, because a Hercules was found with it. It is 
doubtful whether the head belongs to the body. The motive is derived 
from Phidias, but it is late work. It is also described as a Flora or Po- 
mona, but a Hora or Proserpine would be a better designation. 

4:S (3257). Base, with dedication to the Emperor Marcus Aurelius. 

44, 45 (5979, 5980). Columns of Porto Venere marble. 

47. Basin of Pavonazzetto. 

48 (6083). Female Statue in chiton and mantle, the latter covering 
the shoulders and left arm. Face and hands are restorations, and the 
hands are raised in prayer. It is evidently a portrait statue, the diadem 
indicating an empress. It is generally named Lucilla, but on insufficient 
grounds. 

-li (>i '>!:-'). Statue of a woman clad in tunic and palla, probably a Ro- 
man priestess. Head and hands are restored. 



The Marble Statues 



50 (6047). Statue of a woman, designated as Livia, and found in the 
Macellum at Pompeii. It resembles the so-called Pudicitia of the Vatican. 
Head and hands restored. 

51 (6250). Female statue, generally called Calliope, and probably a 
portrait statue. Head and hands restored. 

54 (111070). Roman Sarcophagus. Selene descending from her chariot 
to visit the sleeping Endymion. To the left a hunter and dog, to the 
right a shepherd with his sheep. 

57 (6240). Statue of a woman in stola and palla. Head and hands 
restored. 

58 (6249). Statue of a Girl, member of the family of Balbus. She is 
clad in stola and palla, and her attitude resembles that of Eumachia. 
Traces of colour still visible in the hair. 

59 (6104). Equestrian Statue. The ambling horse is rendered with 
great fidelity to nature. The rider wears a cloak, cuirass and belt. The 
inscription informs us that the statue was erected by the people of Her- 
culaneum in honour of Nonius Balbus. The head was shattered by a 
canon-ball during the insurrection of 1799, a d has been replaced by an 
exact copy, the work of Brunelli. 

60 (6167). Toga statue of M. Nonius Balbus, the elder. The toga hangs 
down from the left side over the scrinium, in exaggerated parallel folds. 

63 (6242 . Statue of a young Roman of the period of Tiberius. 

64 (6705). Sarcophagus. The creation and destruction of man are re- 
presented with a confusion of Greek and Roman myths. On the front 
Prometheus is seated and lying at his feet is the lifeless body of a youth 
that he has made of clay but cannot inspire with life. Clotho, the Fate 
with the distaff, stands before him and an Eros holds his flaming torch 
near the head of the recumbent figure towards which he leads Psyche 
who turns to a second Eros. The life-giving fire comes from Heaven, 
having been stolen by Prometheus from Hephaestus. Hence to the right 
the latter is represented forging lightning for Zeus. An Eros in headlong 
flight carries him the divine fire by a torch. Next to him is Caelus, be- 
neath whom on the ground is Tellus, goddess of the earth, with a cor- 
nucopia and a fruit in her hands. The other elements also take part in 
the creation of man and you thus see beside Prometheus the personifi- 
cation of Water with his oar and dolphin, and of air in Aura who in 
floating garments is placed near Tellus, whilst between her and Eros 
stands Pan. The creation takes place at the moment when all nature 
awakes, hence we see above and to the right the quadriga of Helios, 
his head crowned with sunrays, his hand raised as if to greet Life. The 
consent of the gods being necessary to the creation of man, in the back 
ground appear Zeus and Hera near Psyche and between them is the head 
of Hestia or Magna Mater. Hera gives a bag of money to Hermes, behind 
whom is a Triton blowing on his horn, while to the left of Hermes stands 
Poseidon with the trident on which an Eros, probably Zephyrus, is riding. 
Immediately after his creation, man sinks to the Underworld, therefore 
we have Pluto to the left behind the figure of Water, close by is the God 
of Sleep, brother of Death, and behind these two a figure resembling 
Aura. Still farther to the left, sitting on a rock, is an Erinys with the 
three-headed Cerberus. As creation takes place in the morning, so with 
the evening conies Death, hence the representation of Selene in her chariot 
drawn by two bulls, while in front of her flies Hesperus. 

On the sides are less important figures, such as Atropos deciding the 
hour of death with the aid of a sun-dial and a youth with a horse, per- 
haps Castor, that one of the Dioscuri who is mortal. 



Ground-floor 



The sarcophagus belongs to the period of decadence (third century), 
'but is derived from a good original. There exist four sarcophagi with 
this same motive and of them the one in the Louvre most nearly resem- 
bles ours. 

68 (5821). Basin of rosso antico, transferred to the Museum from the 
Caroline Murat Collection. Winged Tritons support it and between the 
handles are two water-spouts in the form of lions' heads. 

69 (6252). Toga statue of an unknown personage. A bundle of papyrus 
rolls serve as support. Head restored. 

70,71 (5991, 5992). Co- 
lumns of giallo antico. 

73 (3279). Base, with 
dedication to L. Licinius 
Primitivus. 

74 (5993). Colossal 
statue of a ruler in the 
pose of a hero. Both fore- 
arms and the left foot 
are restored. It is remi- 
niscent of a Polycletan 
type. The head resembles 
that of Alexander Seve- 
rus, found on coins (Fig. 
2 and 3). The fillet and 
palm on the support are 
suitable attributes of such 
a lover of the circus. 

75 (2566). Base, with 
dedication to P. Marins 
Philippus. 

Near the pillars of 
the main corridor : 

76,77 (6122, 61 16). Da- 
cian Captives, from the 
Forum of Trajan in Ro- 
me, like those set up on 
the Arch of Constantine. 
The national costume in- 
dicated by the chiton with sleeves, the trousers and cloak, is further 
emphasized by the Phrygian cap and laced boots. Both hang their heads 
in token of their grief and submission. 

78-81 (5970, 5969, 5965, 5966). Four Toga statues of unknown muni- 
cipal officers. 

82 (6780). Marble Base, found in a Cellar at Pozzuoli in 1793. On 
it was a statue of Tiberius erected to him after his re-building of fourteen 
towns in Asia Minor that had been destroyed by earthquake between 
17 and 30 A. D. In front is the dedicatory inscription of the priests of 
Augustus in Puteoli. On either side stand caryatides representing Sardes 
and Magnesia, the former holding a cornucopia and laying her other 
hand protectingly on the head of a naked boy, who probably represents 
a local deity, Tylos. Magnesia (much damaged) who also is dressed as 
a matron, raises her right arm. On the right side of the base stand Phi- 
iadelpheia , Tmolus and Cyme. The first figure in her priestesslike 
bearing ( the town was held sacred ) recalls a fifth century statue of 




Fig. 2. Alexander Severus. 



The Marble Statues 




Fig. 3. Coins of Alexander Severus. 



Demeter. Tmolos, with the mural crown, is personified as a type of 
Dionysus with vine and nebris , because of the vine-clad mountain that 
he represents. This figure reminds one of a Lysippean statue. Cyme, the 
sea-city whose patron goddess was thought to have been carried away 
by Poseidon, holds a trident in her hand. On the left side stand Mo- 
stene , Aegae and Hierocaesareia. The first mentioned holds fruit and 

garlands. At Aegae there 
was a great cult of Po- 
seidon as god of earth- 
quakes, hence the figure 
with trident , dolphin , 
and helmet in the form 
of a prow. Hierocaesare- 
ia, with the mural crown 
and in the costume of an 
Amazon, probably held 
an axe and a pelta in 
her hands ; these are 
missing. On the back 
are six figures, Temnus, 
Cibyra, Myrina, Ephesus 
ApoIIonidea and Hyrcania. Temnus is represented as a male figure, the 
type being borrowed from a statue of Dionysus, engraved on coins. The 
left hand holds the thyrsus, while the missing right hand probably held 
a vase. Cibyra, with helmet, lance and shield, also wears the dress of 
an Amazon Myrina, entirely enveloped in her garment, stands in the 
centre and the tripod and laurel indicate the cult of Apollo near Myrina 
at Gyrneia where there was an oracle. Ephesus is clad as an Amazon 
and is further indicated by the statue of Artemis. Her left foot is pla- 
ced on the head of the river-god Caystrus, her right hand holds wheat- 
ears and poppy-heads , and the rays of her mural crown remind us of 
the natural phenomena that accom- 
pany earthquakes. Again we have the 
dress of an Amazon worn by Apol- 
lonidea. The last figure of all (hands 
with attributes are missing) may be 
intended for the farthermost Parthian 
town , Hyrcania , founded by Mace- 
donians. 

In memory of the generosity 
shown by Tiberius in rebuilding the 
fourteen towns visited by earthqua- 
ke, a colossal statue of him was erec- 
ted in Rome near the Temple of Ve- 
nus Genetrix and round the base were 
placed personifications of twelve 
towns. To these were added Ephe- 
sus and Cibyra which were destro- 
yed later. The monument at Pozzuoli 
is a copy on a smaller scale (Fig. 4). 

Fig. 4. Sextertius of Tiberius. 
83 (2608). Marble Base, with de- 
dication to the Fortuna Redux of the Imperial family. 

81 (6-233). Statue of M. Holconius Rufus. Being a military tribune, 
he is represented in short tunic and cuirass, the latter being adorned 
with griffins, masks, rams' heads and elephants. The hair was coloured 
red, the paludamentum purple and the shoes black. 




Ground-floor 



85 (6282). Statue of Eumachia from Pompeii. This statue was erected 
by the fullers. Being a priestess, she has drawn her garment over her 
head. The movement is full of grace but the execution is mediocre. The 
attitude is similar to that of the Herkulanensis major . Traces of red 
colour in the hair. 

86, 87 (6235, 3898). Statue of Suedius Clemens, less than life size. The 
statue was erected in gratitude for the fact that he had given back to 
the town of Pompeii the domains which had 
been taken into possession by private persons. 

88 (6234). Toga statue of an official, from 
Pompeii. 

89 (2609). Marble Base, commemorating a 
victory won by the Emperor Vespasian. 

90 (2610). Mar- 
ble Base, with de- 
dication to the e- 
ternal peace of the 
house of Vespa- 
sian and his de- 
scendants. 

91-94 (5988, 
5983, 5984, 5987). 
Four Toga Statues 



East Wing. 

Corridor of the 
Tyrannicides. 

To the left: 
95. Aedicula 

of shell -limestone 
with an enthroned 
goddess. 

To the right : 

96 (129181). 
Head , more than 
life size. Found at 
Sorrento in 1902 in 
the workshop of a 
sculptor. Archaic 
work. 

'.i7 (6421). Fe- 
male Head, type of 
the so called Spes. 

iw (0556). Gra- 
ve relief from the 
Museo Borgia at 
Velletri.ln his hair 





Fig. 5. Funerary stele 
ol the Museo Borgia. 



Fig. 6. Stele of Alxenor 
(Athens). 



The Marble Statues 



the deceased wears a fillet, decorated with a feather (?). The chlatnys is 
held fast in the left arm-pit by the staff on which he leans. The left leg 
is crossed over the right, and on the left wrist hangs a small round vase. 
The shoes were coloured, only the soles are plastically treated. In front 
of the man sits a dog, who turns his head towards his master (Fig. 5). 
The relief is undoubtedly an original work of the beginning of the 
fifth century. The stiffness 
of the whole figure and the 
faulty bodily forms are ow- 
ing to lack of skill on the 
part of the artist. The same 
motive occurs in the Stele 
of Alxenor of Naxos, now 
in the Museum at Athens 
(Fig. 6), in which however 
we find more freshness of 
invention and more free- 
dom in execution , while 
the action is better expres- 
sedinasmuch as the figure 
holds a grasshopper tow- 
ards the dog. To avoid dif- 
ficulties of perspective, the 
sculptor of the Neapolitan 
relief has put the right leg 
in profile. 

99 (6257). Head of a 
Youth. The type is early 
but badly executed. 

100 (6258). Head of a 
Youlh. Archaistic Roman 
work. 

101 (6007). Statue of A- 
thena Promachos. Both fo- 
rearms, part of the Aegis 
and the Gorgoneion are re- 
stored. The head can hard- 
ly belong to this body. The 
goddess wears the Ionic 
chiton and peplos, using 
the latter as a shield, and 
brandishes a spear in her 
right hand. The head with 
its Attic helmet is a later 
type and seems rather 
small in proportion to the 
body. The statue is a Ro- 
man imitation of a sixth 
century' type. 

102 (6256). Head of a Youth. Copy of an archaic bronze statue. 

103, 104 (6009, 6010). Harmodius and Aristogeiton. Found at Hadrian's 
Villa near Tivoli and brought to Naples in 1790. The arms and right leg 
of Harmodius, the left hand and right arm of Aristogeiton had already 
been restored. The head of the latter is antique and in the style of Scopas. 
but does not belong to the body. Two young men of athletic build are 




Fig. 7. The Tyrannicides. 
(Reconstitut. in the Museum of Brunswick). 



14 Ground-floor 

rushing forward to attack a common foe. The younger, whose beard is 
just beginning to grow, has thrust forward his right foot and is about 
to deal his adversary a terrific blow with the long sword held in his rai- 
sed right hand. Across his chest was a belt, still recognisable by traces 
of colouring, and he may possibly have held a scabbard in his left hand. 
His older and bearded companion stretches out his left arm using his 
cloak as a shield to protect his comrade and draws back his right arm 
so that he may, in case of necessity, be able to follow up his friend's 
attack by a sword-thrust. 

This master-piece, in its clear 
but simple grouping, the dry exe- 
cution of the bodily forms , the 
mannerism of the hair, the deve- 
lopment of the lower part of the 
face, plainly indicates the influence 
of archaic art. At first the two fi- 
gures were placed opposite one 
another as opponents and were 
thought to be gladiators or heroes 
in combat, till in 1853 Friedrichs 
recognised them to be a copy of 
the famous group of the Tyranni- 
cides which was erected in Athens 
in memory of the slaying of Hip- 
parchus, and of which vaiious co- 
pies have been preserved. Thucy- 
dides, VI. 54, tells us that in 514 
B. C. the two friends avenged pri- 
vate wrongs by killing Hipparchus, 
who with Hippias had succeded 
Pisistratus in the government of 
Athens. The tyrants being univer- 
sally hated, this act acquired poli- 
tical significance and after the ex- 
pulsion of Hippias in 510 the de- 
mocratic party promptly erected 
statues of the two friends who had 
been put to death by Hippias, im- 
mortalising them as their delive- 
rers from the Tyrants. When the 
city was taken by the Persians, 
this group was carried off to Susa, 
but afterwards restored to Athens 
by Alexander or one of his succes- 
sors. Meanwhile when the city had 
freed itself from the Persians , a 
Fig. 8. Artemis. copy of the original group was ma- 

de by Critius and Nesiotes , and 

erected in 477. The question whether we have before us in the Naples 
group the work of Antenor or that of Critius and Nesiotes has now been 
decided in favour of the last mentioned. It was produced in the first 
half of the fifth century. The two sculptors belong to a period of tran- 
sition. The existing copies were made in Imperial times and in rende- 
ring the bronze originals into marble, supports have been added to the 
feet. Close by is a plaster cast of a bust now in Madrid, generally cal- 
led Pherekydes, which was found in 1799 at the same spot where the 
Tyrannicides were discovered. The head exactly fits the body of Aristo- 




The Marble Statues 



geiton and should be placed on the statue instead of the existing one 
of the school of Scopas. (Fig. 7). 

105. Terracotta Base with figure of Nike running. 

106 (6008). Statue of Artemis. The goddess is clad in an Ionic chiton 
and peplos and carries a quiver on her back. The head with hair han- 
ging down behind and curls framing the face, is crowned by a high 
diadem decorated with rosettes. The feet are sandalled. She advances to 
the right, holding a bow in her 

left hand and raising her robe 
with the right. Numerous traces 
of colour are visible in the hair 
and on the garment. (Fig. 8). 
The statue belongs to the archaic 
art of the close of the sixth cen- 
tury and is probably derived from 
a bropze of which the copy be- 
fore us has retained much of the 
character of the original. By some 
people, however, this statue is 
considered to be archaistic. 

107 (6416). Statue of a War- 
rior, wounded in the breast and 
on the point of falling. Only the 
torso is antique. (Fig. 9). This 
motive and the well - rendered 
play of the muscles recall a con- 
temporary of Phidias, Cresilas, 
whose vulneratus deficiens is 
mentioned. This wounded figure 
has been designated Diitrephes, 
of whom a statue was placed on 
the Acropolis, but the motive is 
earlier. 

108, 109 (6484 , 6485). Herms 
of Dionysus, archaistic. 

110 (6006). Orestes and Elec- 
tra, found at Pozzuoli in 1750 in 
the so - called Serapeum. The 
youth, with hair combed over 
his forehead and confined by a 
fillet, bends his head and seems 
to be gazing at something he is 
holding in his left hand (a resto- 




Fig. 9. Wounded warrior 
(before the restoration). 



ration) while his right hangs idly 
down. The maiden , in a long, 
clinging chiton which has slipped 
off her left shoulder, wears a mantle which passes from her right shoulder 
across her back and hangs down from her left arm. Her hair is arranged 
with a fillet. Her right arm is put round the neck of her companion. The 
most suitable designation for this group is Orestes and Electra. The 
sculptor has combined types of two different periods, a practice known 
in the school of Pasiteles, at the beginning of the Imperial epoch. Orestes 
is probably created after a bronze original of the fifth century, while for 
Electra the artist contented himself with a Hellenistic type. 

111. Torso of a Nymph (?). The figure is kneeling, holding a large 



Ground-floor 



shell in front of her, and is a copy of an original of the middle of the 
fifth century. It perhaps represented an assistant in a religious ceremony. 
The copy may have served as a figure for a fountain. 

112 (6408). Statue of a Combatant. Head restored. The figure resembles 
Harmodius (N. 103), and is very probably derived from the same origi- 
nal. In the breast is a hole for a bronze arrow. 

113 (109621). Head of a Man. The long hair has been made out of a 
separate piece. The type originated in the beginning of the fifth century. 

114, 115 (6373, 6324). Herms of Dionysus. Archaistic. 

Hall of the Goddess of Victory. 

116 (6322). Herm of Athena. The goddess is represented as being 

youthful and her expression is 
mild and friendly. She wears an 
Attic helmet, ornamented iu front 
with a Gorgoneion. Because of its 
resemblance to the Irene of Ce- 
phisodotus this head is ascribed 
to that sculptor. Others, however, 
ascribe it to Phidias. (Fig. 10). 
117 (6282). Similar Herm of 
Athena, probably modern. 

118. Statue of Nike. Head and 
arms missing. The goddess of 
Victory is standing on a rock 
which is not visible on account 
of the height at which the statue 
is placed. She wears a thin gar- 
ment which clings to her body 
in the breeze. The right arm was 
raised, while the left hung down 
(Fig. n). It is a Roman copy of 
a statue of the Ionic school. 

119. Torso of a Statuette, cp. 
N. 120. Possibly Artemis? 

120 (5998). Statue of Aphro- 
dite. The surface has suffered 
from reworking. Venus Genetrix, 
after the Aphrodite of Alcame- 
nes, 430 B. C. 

121 (5997). Similar Statue.The 

head was broken off, but belongs to the body. The arrangement of the 
garment more nearly resembles the original and the execution also is 
more careful than in N. 120. 

122 (6737). Grave relief, of which the upper part is missing. Two fi- 
gures are clasping each other by the hand. One of them is accompanied 
by a dog. Near them stands a woman who rests her hand on the shoul- 
der of one of them. 

Hall containing objects from Locri. 

The contents of this hall come from excavations made in Locri, 
near Gerace Marina, in 1889-90. 




The Marble Statues 



Along the wall opposite the window : 

123. Upper portion of an Ionic column with capital, composed ot 
fragments ; opposite, a restoration in plaster. The columns were of fine 
shell limestone, with twenty four flutings. In the centre of the volute is 
a six-petalled rosette. The sides are ornairented with scales. The necking 
is decorated with anthemion (palmette and lotus flower). The forms are 
probably derived from Ionia. 

124. Capital of a Column , cp. 

N. 123. 

In the centre of the hall : 

125. Temple Acroteria. Each 
group represents one of the Dio- 
scuri. The are mounted on horses 
borne by Tritons and are in the act 
of leaping off to assist the people of 
Locri against Croton. They belong 
to the second half of the fifth centu- 
ry. To prevent birds from building 
their nests on the Sculptures, bronce 
spikes were placed here and there, 
and of these one is preserved. 

Show-cases near the window to 
the left : 

126. Fragments of architectural 
terracottas. Especially noteworthy is 
a sima showing Egyptian influence. 
The decoration of fragments of a cor- 
nice recall the anthemion of the co- 
lumn N. 123. In addition to these 
there are vases of various periods 
from extreme antiquity down to those 
made in Lucania. Near them are lit- 
tle (sacral) pyramides, generally de- 
scribed as weights for looms. 

127. Terracotta Figures. Every 
variety of style is exhibited , and 
judging by the attribute of the flower 
or the dove, almost all the figures re- 
present Aphrodite. 

In the passage leading to the 
Hall of Athena: 




n. Nike. 



128 (126174). Relief. To the right, clad in chiton and himation, is 
seated a goddess of superhuman size and approaching her is a proces- 
sion of suppliants, among them a youth leading a ram to sacrifice, 
three children and other figures, all of whom raise their right hands in 
prayer to the goddess. The original belongs to the end of the fifth 
century. 

Hall of the Athena. 

129 (6123). Female Statue, of which the torso alone is antique. It 
represents a young woman, Priestess or Bacchante, clad in a transparent 
chiton which has slipped oft" the right shoulder. 



Grdund-floor 



130 (6303). Head of Athena, on a modern bust. The type resembles 
the Parthenos of Phidias, but may belong to an even earlier period. 

131 (6304). Head of Athena. Surface freely reworked. Fourth cen- 
tury type. 




I- i. 12. Athena Hope (Deepdene). 



132 (6395). Female Statue. Head and forearms are restored. She is 
clad in an Ionic chiton and a himation which is wrapped round the lower 
part of her body, and she rests her left elbow on a column which is 



The Marble Statues 



supporting the entire 
weight of her body. Her 
feet are crossed. This 
graceful statue of good 
workmanship is the copy 
of a fifth century statue 
of a frequently recurring 
type. 

133 (6024). Statue of 
Athena. The head though 
of a different marble be- 
longs to this body. The 
goddess is clad in a long 
Ionic chiton and her 
mantle is folded double; 
her breast is covered by 
the aegis with the Gor- 
goneion and on her head 
is placed an Attic helmet 
decorated with a sphinx 
and griffins. Two long 
curls of hair fall on each 
shoulder. She wears high 
sandals, holds her spear 
in her left hand and a 
bowl or Nike in her right. 
The bearing of the god- 
dess is dignified and her 
expression mild. She is 
conceived as a victorious 
and protecting deity. The 
contrast between the ma- 
terial of her two gar- 
ments is beautifully 
brought out. The work 
must be ascribed to a 
skilful sculptor of Impe- 
rial times who had caught 
the secret of giving the 
impression of the Phi- 
dian bronze in his marble 
copy (Fig. 12). The ori- 
ginal was perhaps the A- 
thena Hygieia on the A- 
cropolis. Her feet being 
of the same size as the 
traces of feet of the base 
of the statue of Athena 
Hygieia , it is possible 
that this figure may be 
a copy of that original 
which was executed by 
Pyrrhus , an Athenian, 
and placed on the citadel 
by Pericles in 430 during 
the great plague. 




Ground-floor 



134 (6393). Head of Apollo. Good replica of the head of the Cassel 
Apollo. The youthful god is represented with long hair encircled by a 
fillet. On either side a long curl hangs down. The face has a severe ex- 
pression, as is usual in statues of the middle of the fifth century, and 
the lower part is strongly developed. The original was undoubtedly a 
bronze statue, attributed to Myron or to Phidias in his youth. (Fig. 16). 
The modern restorer placed this head on the so-called Maia (N. 258). 

135 (6261). Seated Statue, of which the head and arms are restora- 
tions. The youthful Apollo is seated on the tripod and rests his feet on 
the Omphalos. In Delphi, the Omphalos represented the centre of the 
earth , so this is intended to be the Pythian Apollo. Tripod and Om- 
phalos are covered with a net of woollen fillets. The original probably 
belonged to the fifth century. 

136 (6396). Female 
Statue, replica of N. 
132. The head is anti- 
que, but does not be- 
long to the body. 

136 a (131209). Co- 
lossal Statue of Castor, 
found at Baiae. The 
support near the right 
leg is given the form 
of a horse's head. Ro- 
man copy of an earlier 
type derived from the 
Doryphorus of Poly- 
clitus. 

137 (6121). Statue 
of a Woman. Head, 
arms and feet are re- 
stored. The figure is 
resting her left arm 
upon an archaic idol 
on a column. This idol 
probably represents the 
older form of the same 
goddess. 

138 (6727). Orpheus 
and Eurydice. Relief. 
Orpheus, mourning the 
death of his young wife 




Fig. 16. Head of Apollo (Phot. Brogi). 



Kurydice who had been killed by a snake bite, contrived by the power 
of his music to lure her back from the god of the Underworld on con- 
dition that he should not turn round before reaching the upper world. 
This he had almost done when, filled with dread lest his wife should not 
really be following him, he turned to look for her and thus lost her for 
ever. Hermes, who escorts departed souls, clasps Eurydice by the hand 
in order to lead her back to Hades. Nothing is known as to the prove- 
nance of this relief, several portions of which have been restored. There 
an- two replicas of it, one in the Villa Albani and one in the Louvre. It 
probably served with two others (one being the Peliades relief, the other 
the Liberation of Theseus from the Underworld) as decorations of a cho- 
raic monument erected to celebrate a dramatic victory (Figs. 14, 15, 16). 
lii'.t (6369). Female Herm. The figure has been freed from false resto- 



The Marble Statues 



rations, the addition of a mural crown having transformed her into a 
Cybele or into the personification of a town. It represents a goddess 
with waving hair, confined by a broad fillet. The magnificent forms of 
the art of the fifth century are coupled with grace and buty, and the 
head has consequently been identified as an Aphrodite of the second 
half of the fifth century or even as a production of Phidias. (Fig. 17). 

140 (6734). Votive Relief. The youthful Hercules, with club and can- 
tharus, is seated on an altar. Hebe is approaching him to offer him 
a jar of wine. Greek original of the fifth century. 

Hall of the Doryphorus. 

141. Herui of a Woman. 
Fifth century type. 

142 (6107). Female Sta- 
tue. Type of the period of 
Phidias. 

143. Herm of a Woman, 
of which only the head is 
antique. 

144 (6005). Colossal head 
of Artemis (?), generally cal- 
led the Juno Farnese and 
related to the Hera of Poly- 
clitus. (Fig. 19). The expres- 
sion of displeasure depicted 
on the countenance is rather 
to be ascribed to the severe 
art of the fifth century to 
which the original belongs 
than to the character of the 
personage who is represen- 
ted. The treatment of the hair 
recalls a bronze original and 
one is reminded of the Ar- 
temis in the Selinus Metope 
of Artemis and Actaeon. Both 
sculptures are therefore at- 
tributed to Critius. A similar head, even more severe in its forms, is in 
the Jacobsen Collection at Copenhagen. (Fig. 18). 

145 (6725). Relief. The Three Graces, Euphrosyne, Aglaia, Thalia 
and three nymphs, Isniene. Kikais and Eranno leading a smaller figure, 
the personification of the town Telonnesos. 

146 (6011). The Doryphorus. This statue, found in the Palaestra at 
Pompeii in 1797, ranks as the best copy of the original by Polyclitus, 
although the head is raised rather higher than in other copies. It is 
derived from the bronze statue in which Polyclitus embodied his system 
of the proportions of the human body, and which was therefore called 
the Canon . The athlete is represented shouldering and holding with 
his left hand a short spear, hence the designation Doryphorus. The 
body, in accordance with the inclination of the Peloponnesian school, is 
heavily built and reveals perfect knowledge of anatomy. (Fig. 20). The 
original was probably produced about 440 B. C. and we have perhaps 
a truer copy of the head in the bust (N. 854) by Apollonius. 




17. Aphrodite (?). 



Ground-floor 



147 (6412). Herm of the Doryphorus, in which the peculiarities of 
the bronze original are well brought out. The swollen ears reveal the 
boxer. 

148 (6164). Herm of the Doryphorus. The hair is confined by a fillet, 
the ends of which hang down over the breast. Some people identify this 
herm with the Hercules of Polyclitus. 

149 (6715). So-called Puteoli Base. A woman seated in an attitude of 
mourning, personifies a province conquered by Rome. On either side of 
her stand two Caryatids whose heads aud hands are restored. The in- 
scription is modern. The relief is a Roman work , but the figures are 
derived from originals of the fifth century. 

150 (6560). Grave Re- 
lief. Standing in an aedi- 
cula is a woman who clasps 
the hand of the deceased 
youth, Protarchos. 

Hall of the Mosaics. 

The Mosaics from Pom- 
peii are undoubtedly some 
of the best specimens of 
this art that have come 
down to us. Mosaic, work 
originated in the East but 
was developed and exten- 
ded in Alexandria where 
the variety of colour ob- 
tainable encouraged the 
practice of covering flat 
surfaces with marble. The 
work spread from Alexan- 
dria to Byzantium on the 
one side, and on the other 
to Rome and its provinces. 
The Pompeian mosaics are 
certainly among the oldest 
of their kind , some of 
them, for example those 
from the House of the . Fi S- l8 - Head from the collection Jacobsen, 
Faun, belonging to an ear- Copenhague. 

Her period, others to the 

time of Augustus, while the remainder must be dated at least before 79 
A. D. when Pompeii was destroyed. 

Left Wall : 




'. 



151 (10015). Two ducks swimming. 

152 (10016). Theseus slaying the Minotaur in the labyrinth. 

163 (10017). The same subject. In addition the youths and maidens 
sent from Athens as a sacrifice to the Minotaur. 

154 (10018). The same subject. 

155 (109678). Venus at her toilet, fastening a second clasp on her 
foot. Inlaid work ( opus sectile ). 

166 (9977). Satyr and Maenad, Between them a temple. Inlaid work. 



The Marble Statues 



157 (9978). Skeleton, holding a drinking vessel in either hand. The 
ancients loved to increase their joie de vivre by reminding themselves 
of death. 

158 (9979). Bacchic scene. Part of a frieze in inlaid work. 

159 (109679). Mask. 

160 (109687). Mask of Silenus with wreath of ivy. 

161 (9980). A partridge is drawing a mirror out of a toilet-case. 

162 (9981). Harpy, with a broad platter on her head, followed by a 
cupid. Found in Rome on the falatine. 

163 (109982V Human Skull, cp. N. 157. The mosaic was inserted into 
thetop of a table. 

v 164 (9982).Fighling Cocks, 
the winner to be crowned 
and decorated with the palm 
of victory. 

165 (9983). Four Ducks 
amidst aquatic plants. 

X.166 (9984). River Gods, 
much restored. A youth is 
leaning on a vessel from 
which water gushes forth. 
At his feet are seated two 
other figures. 

167 (9985). Scene from a 
comedy, very fine mosaic by 
Dioskurides of Samos, found 
in the so-called Villa of Ci- 
cero. 

168 (9986). A choragus di- 
stributing masks to his actors. 

169 (9987). Scene from a 
comedy, by Dioskurides of 
Samos. Cp N.o 167. 

170 (9988). Lycurgus, 
King of Thrace , who oppo- 
sed the cult of Dionysus, is 
stricken with madness and 
kills Ambrosia who was then 
transformed into a grap-vine. 

171, 172. Aquatic Birds, both from the House of the Faun, and belon- 
ging to N. 175. 

173 (114281). Doves on a vessel with a very beautiful rim. 

174 (120619). Fragments of a very fine mosaic, which represents the 
carrying off of the daughters of Leucippus. 

Below the window : 

175 (9990). Scene from the Nile, forming the border of the Alexander 
mosaic, and representing various animals peculiar to the Nile, such as 
crocodile, hippopotamus, ibis and others. N.os 171, 172 formed part of it. 

To the right of the window : 

176 (114282). Lion and Panther. 




Fig. 



Head of the Juno Farnese. 



Ground-floor 



177 (109371). Fish and Ducks. 

178 (9982). Three birds, seated on the rim of a vessel, are being wat- 
ched by a wild cat. 

V 179 (9991). Autumn, 
excellent mosaic from the 
House of the Faun. A 
winged youth is seated 
on a panther whom he 
guides with one hand 
while with the other he 
carefully holds a vessel 
brimful of wine. A gar- 
land of flowers, fruits and 
masks, like that in N. 
173, encircles the scene. 
The mosaic used to be 
interpreted as Acratus 
but of late is held to be 
a representation of au- 
tumn. 

180 (124666). Portrait 
of a Woman, from life. 

181 (9993). A Wildcat 
nas seized a quail. In the 
lower part, still-life. 

182 (9994). Two tra- 
gic masks, between fruits 
and taeniae. 

183. 184 (9995, 9996). 
Two mosaic columns 
from Pompeii. 

ia5- 187 (84284-84286). 
Three wall paintings of 
the third or fourth cen- 
tury, found in Rome near 
the Lateran. Richly dres- 
sed servants are carrying 
food for a meal. 

188 (120177). Fishes. 
Mosaic of the finest 
workmanship. 

I Hi) (124545). The so- 
called Academy of Plato, 
a union of seven men, 
who were thought to be 
Athenian philosophers 
because the Acropolis is 
indicated in the upper 
right hand corner. The 
figure seated in the cen- 
I-, K . 20. Doryphorus. { is supposed to be 

Plato, the identification of the others is still more uncertain. 
. 190, 191 (9998, 9999). Birds. 




The Marble Statues 



192, 193 (10000, 10001). Two mosaic columns, cp. N. 183. 
194 (114280). Ducks. 
195(9997). Fishes and 
other marine creatures. 

196 ( 10003 ). Slave 
with cocks. 

Opposite the win- 
dow : 

197 (10004). The Three 
Graces, in the usual at- 
titude. 

198 (10005). Phryxus 
on the ram. Helle has 
fallen into the sea. 

199 (10006). Achilles 
drawing his sword and 
threatening Agamemnon, 
who is seated before him, 
while behind him stands 
Athena. 

200(10007). Marriage 
procession of Poseidon 
and Amphitrite, accom- 
panied by Tritons and 
other sea creatures. 

201 (10008). Niche for 
a fountain. 

202 (112284). Mosaic 
threshold with head of 
Medusa. 

203 (110666). Dog. 

204 (9989). Bacchus, 
lying at ease, and giving 
water to his panther. 

Wall to the left of 
the window : 

205,206(10009,10011). 
Triton with oar and dish 
of fruit. 

207 (10010). A young 
athlete, wearing the cae- 
stus. Beneath him a cock 
as symbol of victory. 

208,209(10012,10013). 
A Candelabra, on the up- 
per part of which is a cu- 
pid, hunting a stag. 

210 (10014). Cock pecking at a pomegranate. 
In the centre of the room : 

211 (10019). Lion enchained by cupids, who are playing around him. 
It is supposed to represent the triumph of love over brute force. 




26 



Ground-floor 



Hall of the Athletes. 

212 (119917). Statue of a young pugilist hence the caestus on the right 
hand. Found in Sorrento. The original was a bronze of the school of 
Polyclitus, and when it was copied in marble, a herm of the bearded 
Hercules was added as a support. Both feet are placed flat on the ground 
after the archaic manner. (Fig. 21). The name of the copyist is specified 
on the base, but the interpretation of the inscription is still doubtful. 




. Fig. 22. ,,Protesilaos". 

218 (6310). Herm of Bacchus, archaistic. Only the head is antique. 
214, 215 Male Torso. 

216, 217 y7(i, (i-272). Two Herms, of which only the heads are antique. 
218 (6411). Statue of a Man, of which the head is antique but does 



The Marble Statues 



not belong to this body. Right arm and left hand are restored. The left 
arm, draped with the mantle as a shield, is stretched out, while the 
right hand probably held the sword. The warrior is wounded in the left 
thigh (Fig. 22), and perhaps formed part of a group the signification of 
which is not as yet clear. The head is a replica of the type of an Apollo 
or Alexander. The original of the statue must be related to the school 
of Scopas, bearing, as it does, a distinct resemblance to the Niobids. 

219 (6308). Bearded Dio- 
nysus. 

220 (6410). Statue of a War- 
rior, archaistic. Head and arms 
are restored. He is wounded in 
the left thigh and with great 
difficulty maintains a standing 
position, supporting himself on ]> 
his right foot. The original was 
of bronze and belonged to the 
middle of the fifth century. 

221 (6317). Herm of Diony- 
tus, archaistic, the head alone 
being antique. 

Corridor of the Flora. 

222. Herm of a Man, jud- 
ging by the ram's horns it is 
intended to be Amtnon. Good 
sculpture of the Hellenistic pe- 
riod. 

223 (113529).Mask, the horns 
indicate lo. 

224 (6360). Statue of Aescu- 
lapius. The god, clad in a hi- 
mation , lays his right arm (a 
restoration) on his club, round 
which a snake is curled. At his 
left side is a low Omphalos , 
this being his attribute as Apol- 
lo's son. A picture of perfect 
health, he stands calmly in an 
attitude that recalls the school 
of Phidias. Alkamenes is gene- 
rally named as the inventor of 
this type. In 420 B. C. he made 
a statue of Aesculapius forMan- 
tineia and perhaps a replica of 
it for Athens where the cult of 
the god had been introduced 
from Epidaurus. The Naples 
statue is one of the best copies, 

ranking second only to the one in Florence (cp. Fig. 23). It is supposed 
that it once stood as a cult image in the Temple of Aesculapius on the 
Tiber island. 

225 (6269). Female Statue. Both hands are restorations. It is questio- 
nable whether the diadem, restored in plaster belongs to the head. The 
statue may be a Demeter or a Kore, of a type derived from Phidias. 




Fig. 23. Statue of Aesculapius in the 
Uffizi of Florence (Phot. Alinari). 



28 



Ground-floor 



226 (6399). Female Statue, restored as a Melpomene, and resembling 
the last-mentioned figure. A better copy, which may even be a Greek 
original, is to be found in the Museum of the Doge's Palace in Venice, 
(cp. Fig. 24). 

227 (6378). Statue of a Woman, the left hand holding the garment is 
a restoration. Having been found at Herculaneum with the statues of 
the Muses, it was designated Mnemosyne, mother of the Muses, but tbe 
original was probably a portrait-statue, intended to be placed on a grave. 
It is a fifth century motive. The head was found at the feet of the statue, 

but the peculiar style in which the 
hair is dressed raises doubt as to 
whether this head belongs to the fi- 
gure. It is of a later type, may be 
compared with the Corinna of Sila- 
nion and the Kore in Munich. 

228(6404). Female statue, of which 
only the torso is antique. It is a re- 
plica of the type of the Herculanensis 
minor. 

229 (6357). Herm of a Woman 
with elaborately dressed hair, inter- 
preted as Ariadne or a Bacchante. 

230 (6356). Similar Herm. 

231 (6288). Statue of Venus, of 
the Medicean type. A tall vessel and 
a cloak are placed near her. 

232 (6295). Statue of Venus , se- 
mi-nude, nearSier is a cupid on a sea 
creature. Head and right arm of the 
Venus are restorations. 

233 (6301). Statue of Venus , of 
which the head and the breast are 
restored. Only the lower part of the 
goddess's body is draped , and the 
support is in the form of a dolphin 
on whose tail she rests her right 
hand. The original may have belon- 
ged to the first half of the fourth 
century. 

234 (6196). Female Bust, of a type 
recalling Praxiteles. . 

235 (6316). Statue of a youthful 
Bacchus , with thyrsus and cantha- 
rus. Near him is a panther. 

236 (6311). Statue of Dionysus, 
cp. N. 235. Only the torso is antique. 

:>:!7 (6328). Bust of a laughing Satyr, only the face being antique. 

_':;s (iK{i>). Similar bust, of which only the head is antique. 

239 (6276). Statue of Artemis, the huntress. The head is antique but 
perhaps does not belong to the body. Both arms are restored. The god- 
dess is in the act of running and is drawing an arrow from her quiver, 
the bow being held in the left hand. Her dog has seized a fawn. Me- 
diocre replica of the type of the Arlemis of Versailles, which is derived 
from a statue by Leochares or Euphranor. 




Fig. 24. Abundance. Venice. 
(Phot. Alinari). 



The Marble Statues 



240 (6351). Statue of Ganymede. His right arm, the head of the eagle 
and the dog are all restorations. His arm rests on the eagle and near 
him stands his dog. The statue is very probably related to the fifth cen- 
tury type of an athlete. 

241 (6358). Statue of Paris. The head is an addition, but is antique. 
The youth is leaning with his left hip against the trunk of a tree. The 
left hand (a restoration) holds two hunting spears. The restorer has pla- 
ced an apple in the right hand as though Paris were about to award the 
prize for beauty. This graceful statue, of mediocre execution, is derived 
from a fourth century original, similar to the Meleager of Scopas. 

242 (6409). Colossal sta- 
tue of a Woman. This statue 
was found in 1540 at Rome 
in the Baths of Caracalla and 
is known as the Farnese Flo- 
ra. The head, arms, feet and 
plinth are restorations. The 
figure, clad in a transparent 
chiton which reveals the bo- 
dily forms and which has slip- 
ped off the right shoulder, is 
advancing and in all proba- 
bility originally held in its 
right hand not the chiton but 
a portion of the cloak which 
hangs down the back. The 
attribute in the left hand is 
undetermined. The statue 
might be taken to be an A- 
phrodite of the Praxitelean 
school , other designations 
being arbitrary. The motive 
of the figure resembles that 
of the ElectraiN. no) and of 
the Antiope (N. 260). The co- 
py before us was probably 
produced in the second or 
third century after Christ, at 
which period the same type 
was employed for statues of 
Victory, which may also ha- 
ve been the original signifi- 
cation of the Farnese Flora 
(Fig. 25). 

243 (5999). Group of a 
Warrior with a Boy. The re- 
storer has placed the head of pj g 25 pi ora Farnese (Phot. Brogi). 
Commodus on the figure of 

the warrior who is advancing hastily, having thrown the dead body of 
the boy over his left shoulder where he clutches it with his left hand. 
His right hand ought perhaps to be holding a sword. It is doubtful whe- 
ther the warrior is the boy's friend or enemy. In the first case the group 
may represent Hector rescuing the body of Troilus ; in the second case 
one might think for example of Neoptolemus with Astyanax. The original 
is probably derived from the Hellenistic period , in which were created 
groups such as Menelaus and Patroclus, or Ulysses and Diomede. 




Ground-floor 



244 (6273). Statue of Demeter. The head does not belong to this fi- 
gure. She wears a high girdled Jonic chiton and over it a himation. The 
bunch of poppies held in the left hand is antique only in part. The right 
arm was outstretched. The motive is probably derived from the second 
half of the fifth century. 

245 (6271). Statue of a Man. The head and arms are restored. The 
god, who to judge by the dolphin must be Poseidon, held a trident with 
his left hand. The motive of the statue is borrowed from the Diadume- 
nus of Polyclitns. 

246 (6073). Statue of a Man. 
The head apparently belongs to 
the body, both arms are resto- 
red. It represents a Roman of the 
close of the first century after 
Christ. The motive of the Statue 
is taken from the school of Po- 
lyclitus. 

Hall of the Farnese Bull. 

247 (6027). Statue of the Hera 
Farnese. Among other parts Al- 
bacini restored the two outstret- 
ched arms. The goddess is clad 
in a thin chiton which does not 
conceal the bodily forms. Over 
it she wears the himation which 
passes from ihe left shoulder to 
the hip and thence in deep folds 
to the left arm. In her raised 
right hand the goddess holds the 
sceptre. Her hair, which is crow- 
ned by a diadem , is arranged 
in a simple knot at the neck. 
The magnificent, simple and yet 
graceful forms lead us to reco- 
gnise in this statue one of the 
most beautiful creations of the 
fifth century. The original was 
the Hera of Alcamene, the beau- 
ty of which is still more marked 
in the headless statue from Ephe- 
sus, now in V'enna (Fig. 26). 

248 (6391). Female statue, to 
which a head with modern neck 

Fig. 26. Hera from Ephesus (Vienna), has been added. The arms are 

restored. The girl, clad in chiton 

and himation is stooping slightly as she walks and bends her head back 
as if to watch something that threatens her from above. She is there- 
fore designated as a Niobid or as the nurse of the Niobids, but the 
motive frequently recurs in ancient art. The figure seems originally to 
have represented a Danaid going to the fountain or a Dancing Muse, 
and is derived from a work of the Hellenistic period. 

249 (I5'25:{). Statue of a Man. This has been much patched and pro- 
vided with a head that does not belong to it. It evidently represents a 
youthful nude Apollo who rests his whole weight towards the left on 




The Marble Statues 



a support which is now missing, and the place of which is taken by 
the wide cloak which falls to the ground from his left arm. The head 
was looking upwards and to the left. Only one copy with the original 




Fig. 27. Venus of Capua, 
head remains to us and is in the Uffizi. The figure was considered to 
be an Apollo and was attributed to Praxiteles but others recognise in 
it the Pothos of Scopas. 



3-' 



Ground-floor 



250 (6350). Bust of the bearded Dionysus or of Priapus. Only the 

head is antique. Good execution. 

251 (6017). Statue of the Venus of Capua. The arms have been re- 
stored by A. Brunelli. The hole in the base was made for a cupid. The 
head of the goddess is ornamented with a diadem, the hair being parted 
in the centre and caught up again at the back. She has wrapped the 

lower part of her body in a 
garment which remains in pla- 
ce because of the attitude of 
her limbs. The head is in com- 
plete profile and so are the 
arms holding the shield of 
Mars in which she can see her 
reflection. To still further 
emphasise her power over the 
god, she places her left foot on 
his helmet (Fig. 27). The Ve- 
nus of Capua, of mediocre Ro- 
man workmanship , is derived 
from the same original as the 
Venus of Milo. Perhaps they 
both come from the temple sta- 
tue on the Acropolis at Corinth, 
as depicted on coins, but the 
actual invention of the attitude 
of the legs is derived from the 
Aphrodite Urania of Phidias. 
In Hellenistic and Ionic art 
this motive frequently recurs 
in connection with Ares , as 
the goddess of Victory wri- 
ting on a shield (in Brescia) ; 
probably the Venus Genetrix 
of Caesar, a production of Ar- 
cesilaus, also had a similar mo- 
tive. The copy before us was 
perhaps executed during the 
reign of Hadrian at the period 
when the amphitheatre at Ca- 
pua was being newly decorated. 
The style of Scopas is even bet- 
ter reproduced in a statue in 
the Albani Collection (Fig. 28). 
252 (6320). Bust of Athena. 
The head with Corinthian hel- 
met is of poor workmanship 
and was intended for insertion 
into a statue. The original is 
ascribed to Timotheus. 
J.">:s (ti() L J2). Satyr with the child Dionysus. This group reveals a 
good master but has been much restored by Albacini who made the 
upper part of the boys body and the face and arms of the satyr. The 
young satyr is dancing and looking at the child on its shoulder, while 
accompanying himself on the cymbals. The group is a good copy of a 
bronze original of the Hellenistic period. 

jr. I (i;:;:!:i). Butt of Silt-mis, a replica of Silenus with the child Bac- 
chus. Only the head is antique. 




Albani. 



The Marble Statues 



255 (6329). Pan and Olympos. The hands and legs of both figures 
are restored. The original, of the Hellenistic period, was a production 
of Heliodorus. Pan is teaching Olympos to play the syrinx. 

256 (6326). Bust of Silenus. Originally the eves were inserted. 




Fig. 29. Farnese Bull. 



257 (6307). Dionysus with Eros. The arms of Dionysus and the grea- 
ter part of the figure of Eros are restorations. Dionysus had probably 
laid his right arm on his head. His face, enframed in long curls, is tur- 
ned towards Eros, who stands at his side and probably held a bow and 
arrows. The type of this good copy was derived from Praxiteles. 

258 (6393). Headless Herm of a Woman. A head of Apollo (N. 134) 
was from the restorer placed on this herm, and on the false assumption 
that it was found in the Temple of Apollo in Pompeii it was taken to 



34 Ground-floor 



represent Maia, the mother of Hermes. It formed part of the Farnese 
Collection. 

259 (6392). Herm of Hercules. The head and right arm are restored. 
The hero is wrapped in the lion skin. Similar berms are to be found in 
Rome in the Torlonia and Ludovisi Collections. 

260 (6002). The so-called Farnese Bull, restored by C. B. Biondi ac- 
cording to the directions of Michael Angelo and by Call in 1848. The 
head of Amphion (in which Biondi has reproduced the features of Ca- 
racalla) , his arms and legs and the head, arms and legs of Zethus are 
restorations, so are the entire upper part of Dirce's body, Antiope's 
head, left hand and right arm. On Mount Cithaeron Antiope had given 
birth to Amphion and Zethus, sons of Zeus. She had been kept prisoner 
by Dirce, the wife of Lycus, King of Thebes, and escaped, but was recaptu- 
red on Mount Cithaeron by the queen who had journeyed there (this 
accounts for the basket near her) to celebrate the Dionysiac festival. 
Meanwhile Zethus and Amphion had grown up and it was into their 
hands that Antiope was delivered with directions that she should be 
dragged to death behind a bull. At the last moment the youths reco- 
gnised their mother and are depicted in the act of executing on Dirce 
the cruel punishment she had devised for Antiope. Amphion, distingui- 
shable by his lyre, holds the bull by the head, while Zethus is occupied 
in binding Dirce to the bull. The barking dog increases the confusion, 
but beneath Amphion , the Genius of Mount Cithaeron waits in undi- 
sturbed calm (Fig. 29). 

The plants and animals round the base serve to indicate the wildness 
of the landscape. The group before us is a more or less faithful copy of 
a work by Apollonius and Tauriscus of Tralles. It is mentioned by 
Pliny and was brought by Asinius Pollio to Rome. The figure of Antiope 
shows no independence of treatment and can scarcely have been present 
in the original group (cp. N. 242). The copy before us was probably 
produced in the second or third century after Christ and may have ser- 
ved as the central group of a large fountain. It was found in 1546 in 
the Baths of Caracalla, was then placed in the Villa at Naples, and in 
1826 transferred to the Museum. 

261 (6264). Seated Statue. Both arms are restored. A nude youth is 
seated on a rock and holds a lyre in his left hand. He is generally de- 
signated as Apollo, but is perhaps intended to be Paris. The execution 
is mediocre. 

262 (6313). Bust of Ariadne. Good workmanship. Only the head is 
antique. 

263 (6318). Statue of Bacchus. The head belongs to the body ; the 
arms and left leg are restored. The young god is crowned with vine 
leaves and is leaning his left arm on the trunk of a tree. He had pro- 
bably raised his right arm above his head. The copy is a good one exe- 
cuted in the time of Hadrian after a type produced by Praxiteles. 

264 (6332). Statue of a Satyr. Only the torso is antique. 

265 (6325). Statue of a Satyr, threatening to strike a panther with 
his pedum. In his nebris he is carrying fruit. 

266 (6331). Statue of a Satyr. Head and arms are restored. The 
motive is the same as in N. 264 , but the execution is better. It is 
doubtful whether the restoration with grapes and bowl is a correct one. 
He ought perhaps to be imagined pouring out wine. 

267 (6274). Herm of Ammon, after an original of the school of Phi- 
dias. Perhaps this one was in Cyrene. 



The Marble Statues 



!). Paris and Helen. This relief was found in Marino. Aphro- 
dite is seated next Helen and tries to persuade her. Peitho, the goddess 
of persuasion, is seated behind them on a pillar. To the right is Cupid 
leading Paris Alexandros. Evidently that moment is depicted when 
Paris, dominated by love for Helen, determines to carry her off. This 
graceful composition reminds us of Action's picture of the Marriage of 
Alexander and Roxana. 
269 (6019). Torso of 
a Woman, the so-called 
Psyche of Capua, found 
there in 1726 in the Am- 
phitheatre. The identifi- 
cation as Psyche is im- 
possible as there are no 
wings, the incision in the 
back being modern. It is 
probably an Aphrodite, 
drawing her garment for- 
ward from her back while 
she gazes at her own ima- 
ge in a mirror held by 
Eros (Fig. 30). It seems 
to be a production of ear- 
ly Imperial times, a copy 
of a fourth century origi- 
nal derived from a school 
parallel to Praxiteles and 
Scopas. 

270(6016). Nude youth. 
Call restored the feet 
and arms. He rests the 
whole weight of his body 
against the trunk of a 
tree to the left and his 
gaze is directed down- 
wards. The original was 
produced in the school 
of Praxiteles; the copy is 
Roman and served , as 
did N.o 251 and 269, to 
adorn the amphitheatre 
at Capua. 

271 (6361). Female 
Bust. Only the head is 
antique and resembles 
that of the Cnidian A- 
phrodite by Praxiteles. 

272 (6713). Visit of 

Dionysus to Icarius. Relief from the Borgia Collection. Icarius and his 
wife are reclining on a couch and receive a visit from the bearded Bac- 
chus. Enveloped in a long garment and supported by a satyr, he comes 
to feast with them, and is followed by his procession. A facsimile of this 
relief is in the Louvre and many slightly varying copies of it are to be 
found. It belongs to the so-called Neo-Attic reliefs in which there is a 
combination of archaistic and naturalistic forms. 

273, 274 (6306, 6863). Herm of the bearded Bacchus, a good replica of 

3* 




Fig. 30. Psyche of Capua. 



Ground-floor 



the so-called Sardanapalus of the Vatican. The original is attributed to 
Cephisodotus or Praxiteles. Beneath the bust is a rectangular base with 
Bacchic attributes. 

275 (6353). Statue of Eros, with large wings. The arms and the lower 
part of the feet are restored. The young god probably held a torch or 
an arrow In his right hand which is lowered. In the other hand he held 
a bow. The Eros of Centocelle in the Vatican (Fig. 31) is a better copy 
of the same original , a production of Praxiteles, his Eros of Thespiae 
which testified to his love for Phryne the beautiful. By some people the 
statue before us is regarded as the god of Death. Judging by the num- 
ber of replicas, the bronze original must have been a masterpiece. 

276 (6138). Male bust of 
Polyclitan type. 

277 (6026). Nereid on a 
sea -monster. This group, 
much restored in plaster, was 
found in Posilipo and the ori- 
ginal belongs to the Helleni- 
stic period. It may perhaps 
have been a figure for a foun- 
tain, but it has also been de- 
signated Leucothea, who was 
worshipped in Naples. 

278 (6355). Ganymede em- 
bracing the eagle. Part of the 
eagle and of the pedum are 
antique so no doubt can exist 
as to the designation of the 
group, in spite of the many 
restorations. The motive of 
the nestling body is derived 
from Praxiteles , the copy- 
being a good work of the Ro- 
man period. 

279 (6275). Head, resem- 
bling the Zeus of Otricoli. 
The bust is modern. 

280 (6001). Colossal Sta- 
tue of the Farnese Hercules 
found with Nos. 240 and 260 
in the Baths of Caracalla at 
Rome. The legs were disco- 
vered afterwards and united 
to the body by Tagliolini. 
Only the left hand and fore- 

arm and a few trifling details 

are modern. Hercules stands 
rig- 3i. Eros of Centocelle in the calmly, resting his weight 

Vatican Museum (Phot. Anderson). on his club which is thrust 

under his left shoulder and 

behind his back he holds in his right hand the apples of the Hesperi- 
des. He is represented in a tired, thoughtful attitude, having arrived at 
the end of his many labours and not yet having received the gifts of 
immortality and eternal youth. Others connect him with the child Tele- 
phus or imagine him as about to descend into Hades. The type often 




The Marble Statues 



37 



recurs in ancient art from the time of Polyclitus down to the Hellenistic 
derivatives. On our copy the sculptor inscribes his name, D.vxwv 'Adrj- 
vaTo? enoUi , and he probably 'lived in the time of Caracalla. To him 
must be attributed the exaggeration in the formation of the muscles. 
The name of Lysippus who made the original, is given us on a copy in 
the Palazzo Pitti, but the treatment of the original bronze is still better 
brought out in a copy in the Uffizi (Fig. 32). 

281 (67-26). Relief of a Bac- 
chic procession. Very fine exe- 
cution. Roman replica of a 
well-known motive. 

282 (6779). Marble Vessel, 
decorated with a Bacchic pro- 
cession consisting of nine figu- 
res. Archaistic. 

283 (6673). So-called Vase 
of Gaeta. It is encircled by a 
relief representing the giving 
of the child Dionysus into the 
care of the Nymphs of Nysa. 
On the other side there is a 
Bacchic procession composed 
of ecstatic figures. The vase is 
inscribed with the signature of 
Salpion, an Athenian sculptor, 
and is a fine specimen of Neo- 
Attic art. It used to stand at the 
harbour of Gaeta and marks 
are still visible where anchor 
ropes were thrown round it. It 
was afterwards used as a font 
in the Cathedral and transfer- 
red to the Museum in 1805. 

284 (6778). Marble Vessel 
with two reliefs of Dionysus 
and a Satyr, each of them being 
accompanied by two goddesses 
of the Seasons. 

285 (6724). Relief of a Mae- 
nad defending herself against 
the attack of a Satyr. She has 
seized him by the beard and 
endeavours to thrust him from 
her. During the struggle her 
garment has slipped from her 
body. The type is Hellenistic. 

286. Herm of the bearded 
Hercules, found in Naples. 

287. Male Torso. The re- 
mains of a tail lead us to conclude that it is a Satyr. He was dancing 
and playing the kroupezion or foot rattle. 

288 (6675). Well-head with relief of wine-pressing. Satyrs are busily 
treading grapes, while others are bringing fresh supplies. Excellent Greek 
workmanship. 




Fig. 32. Statue of Hercules in the Uffizi 
of Florence. 



38 Ground-floor 

289 (6670). Well-head with many deities : Zeus, Ares, Apollo, Aescu- 
lapius, Dionysus, Hercules and Hermes. Good Roman work. 

290 (6728). Relief of Dionysus with a panther. The upper portion is 
restored. 

291 (124325). Sarcophagus with the finding of Achilles in Scyros. A- 
chilles had been disguised as a girl and concealed in the house of Ly- 
comedes among his daughters , but was discovered by the cunning of 
Ulysses and forced to take part in the Trojan War. Deidamia, his be- 
trothed, vainly strives to prevent his departure. On the sides are scenes 
from the life of Achilles. The sarcophagus was destined for Metilia Tor- 
quata and made in the second century after Christ. 




Fig. 33. Colossal Mask of Zeus Fig. 34. Zeus of Otricoli in the Vatican. 
(Phot. Brogi). (Phot. Anderson). 

292 (6359) Bust of Aesculapius. Only the- head is antique. 

293. Seated Male Torso, a very fine replica of the Ares Ludovisi. The 
god of war, a strong, slender youth, is seated quietly dreaming of fame 
and battle but his meditations are interrupted and his thoughts turned to 
the subject of love by the Eros at his feet. Perhaps there was another 
Eros at his left shoulder, whispering words of love, but such an attri- 
bute can scarcely have been present in the original. The characteri- 
stic motive is derived from a painting by Polygnotus. It is a question 
whether we are to consider the plastic rendering to be the work of Sco- 
pas or Lysippus for the figure possesses the pathos of the one and the 
proportions of the other. The torso lay neglected in the Museum Garden 
and has been placed within doors only since 1897. 

294 (6035). Female Torso, entirely nude except for a remnant of a 
mantle on the back. The execution is very fine and the figure is derived 
from one by Praxiteles or Euphranor of Corinth. 



The Marble Statues "39 



295 (6034). So-called Torso Farnese. Remains of a statue of Dionysus, 
which was more than life-size and probably formed part of a group. It 
belongs to the fourth century. 

296 (6260). Colossal Mask of Zeus, which although closely akin to the 
Zeus of Otricoli still shows variations in the characterisation, the Vatican 
head giving the presentment of a good-humoured god, while the Farnese 
depicts a vivacious, energetic Zeus. These two creations appear to be 
the work of contemporaries, and one is inclined to ascribe the one to 
Bryaxis and the other to Leochares, whose Zeus Polieus is mentioned. 
(Fig. 33 and 34). 

In the passage : 

297 (6296). Statue of Aphrodite rising from the sea (Anadyomene). The 
support takes the form of a dolphin, on which Eros is seated. 

298 (6218). Group of an old man and a youth. The head and right 
arm of the former are restorations while the left arm of the boy is mo- 
dern. They are engaged in seething a sacrificial pig. Roman copy of 
mediocre execution. 

299 (6406). Hercules and Omphale. The manly hero, the image of all 
male virtues, succumbs to the influence of the woman and has exchanged 
clothes with her as Ovid describes (Heroides IX). Omphale has proudly 
seized the hero's attributes of club and lion-skin, while he has put on the 
transparent chiton and veil of his mistress and sits down to spin. The 
motive is derived from the Alexandrian period but the execution is Roman 
and comparatively good. The restorations include Hercules' left arm with 
the distaff, the legs of Omphale, her right arm and the club, while the 
base also is new. 

Kail of the Amazons. 

The sculptures here assembled mainly belong to a series that is of 
the greatest importance in the history of their period and the history 
of art. The kings of Pergamon having successfully repulsed the invasion 
of the Gauls, proceeded to adorn their capital with works of art, seeking 
above all to celebrate their victory over the Gauls by comparing it with 
the struggle of the civilised Greeks against the barbaric Persians and with 
the battle of the gods and the giants. Eumenes the Second and Attalus 
the First seem to have employed their sculptors in making different sized 
series of these combats. To one life size series which was set up in Per- 
gamon belong the so-called Dying Gaul of the Capitol and the Gaul and 
his Wife in the Ludovisi Collection. Of another series in which the fi- 
gures are about two thirds life size, Naples possesses four statues, three 
more are in the Doge's Palace in Venice, that of a Persian is in Aix, a 
Gaul in the Louvre and one figure in Berlin. Probably several individual 
statues of their opponents have remained unidentified. Naples has the 
advantage of possessing a specimen of each group. (Fig. 35-40). 

300 (6014). Persian. The whole of the right arm and portions of the 
feet are restored. He has fallen on his shield and lies on his left side, 
while his curved sword slips from his grasp. The execution is mediocre. 
(Fig. 37)- 

301 (6013). Giant, who lies dead on his back. To protect himself he 
had wrapped his left arm in a hide and he still holds his sword in his 
right hand. The execution is less careful than in the other statues. (Fig. 38). 
Various portions have been restored including one half of the left leg. 

302 (6015). Gaul, wounded in the left side and supporting himself with 
his left hand on the ground while the right hangs helpless. The position 




Fig. 35. Dead Gaul from the Doges' Palace of Venice (Phot. Brogi). 




Fig. 36. Falling Gaul from the Doges' Palace of Venice (Phot. Alinari) 




Fig. 37. Persian from the Pergamene group (Phot. Brogi). 




Fig 38. Giant from the Pergamene group (Phot. Brogi). 




Fig. 39. Wounded Gaul from the Doges' Palace of Venice (Phot. Alinari). 




Fig. 40. Amazon from the Pergamene group (Phot. Brogi). 



Ground-floor 



is almost identical with the Gaul of the Capitol but is reversed. The 
helmeted head is antique but does not belong to the body. 

303 (6012). The Amazon has 
sunk down having been wounded 
in the breast and lies on her back. 
The limbs are relaxed in death 
and the beautiful bodily forms are 
accentuated. In spite of re-wor- 
king from which the nude por- 
tions have suffered severely, this 
figure may be considered to be 
the finest of all those that are 
preserved (Fig. 40). In a sixtenth 
century drawing we see that a 
child lay at her breast, but this 
later addition had nothing what- 
ever to do with the Pergamene 
original. 

304 (6407). Equestrian Statue, 
very much restored. The warrior 
wears a short cuirass. Mediocre 
Roman work. 

305 (6405). Equestrian Statue 
of an Amazon. Her forearms and 
feet and large portions of the 
horse are restorations executed 
by Albacini. Having been woun- 
ded, the Amazon is on the point 
of falling from her galloping 
horse. The Roman copy, although 
of mediocre execution , bears a 
certain relationship to N. 303. 

Hall 
of the Venus Callipygus. 

306 (6289). Female Bust, pro- 
bably Aphrodite ; good work- 
manship. 

307 (6286). Statue of Venus. 
The arms are restorations , the 
head belongs to the body. It is 
a replica of the type of the Ve- 
nus del Medici. 

308 (6339). The little Cupid. 
He has fallen asleep with his bow 
between his legs. This playful 
motive frequently appears in A- 
lexandrian art. 




Fig. 41. Venus Callipygus. 
(Phot. Brogi). 



309 (62!). Venus and Cupid. 
Her right forearm , left hand , 
half of her feet and his legs and 
arms are restorations by Albacini. The goddess is nude and crouches in 
her bath after the manner of the Venus of Daedalus, the Bithynian. Her 



The Marble Statues 43 



head is turned towards Cupid who touches her in order to obtain her 
attention. 

310 (6297). Crouching Venus (cp. N. 309). The head is a restoration 
in different marble. Poor copy of the Venus of Daedalus. 

311 (6281). Female Head, possibly Aphrodite. Archaistic work and 
painted originally. 

812 (6283). Statue of Venus. Only the torso is antique. Venus Ana- 
dyomene. Good workmanship. 

313 (6285). Bust of Aphrodite. Archaistic sculpture, similar to N. 311, 
with painted eyes. It is a charming piece of work. 

314 (6020). Statue of Venus Callipygus. The head, shoulders, left arm, 
right hand and the lower part of the right thigh have been restored by 
Albacini. The youthful goddess is in the act of laying aside her garments 
before bathing and cannot resist the pleasure of looking at her reflection 
in the water. The original belonged to the Hellenistic period and perhaps 
ornamented a spring in the centre of which the motive would be clearly 
brought out. The name Callipygus has been given her because of a temple 
statue at Syracuse which is mentioned by Athenaeus but with which the 
statue before us has no connection. The correctness of the restoration is 
proved by replicas in small bronzes and in gems. The execution of this 
copy is careful and good. (Fig. 41). 



Egyptian Collection. 

Prefatory Remarks. 



Although the civilisation of the Chaldeans is older than that of the 
Egyptians, the latter has long been better known to us through its ma- 
sterpieces of art. We can trace them back five thousand years before 
Christ to the time of Menes, the founder of the first Dynasty. 

Thirty Dynasties ruled in almost unbroken sequence over the land 
of Egypt and, with the help of the Phoenicians, spread their culture 
abroad into the countries bordering the Mediterranean. Subsequently 
under the Ptolemies Egypt herself came under Greek influence though 
preserving, as during the Roman supremacy, her ancient religious forms 
and ceremonies. Owing chiefly to the growth of Christianity the knowledge 
of the written and spoken language died out and after the Arabian in- 
vasion both completely disappeared. Consequently the great inscriptions 
of which many were preserved remained a sealed book until Champol- 
lion by comparing the bi-lingual inscription on the famous Rosetta stone 
with another found in the Island of Philae , discovered the lettering of 
the two names Ptolemy and Cleopatra and thus partly solved the secret 
of the hieroglyphs. Since then our knowledge of the language has made 
great strides and we are able to study the history, religion and litera- 
ture of Egypt to far greater advantage than formerly. 

The earliest period of Egyptian history is usually called Memphitic, 
a word derived from the name of the former capital Memphis now Be- 
draschen near Cairo. This period embraces ten Dynasties of which the 
fourth, the Dynasty of Cheops (Chufu), Chefrem (Kaf-ra) and Mykerinos 
(Men-Kaura) the builders of the pyramids about 4000 B. C. is most 
famous. 

The Pharaoh who was contemporaneous with Abraham belongs to 
the twelfth Dynasty. His successors were conquered by thejHyksos or 



44 Ground-floor 



Shepherd Kings under whose rule the Hebrews settled in the land of 
Goschen. The eighteenth Dynasty freed the land and extended their 
empire to the banks of the rivers Euphrates and Tigris. Ramses the 
Second (of the nineteenth Dynasty) is credited with persecuting the 
Jews. In his reign was born Moses, who under his successor Menephta 
led them out of captivity. From the twenty-first to the twenty-fifth dy- 
nasties there followed a period of decline and the country fell under the 
sway of the Assyrians. The victories of Cambyses put an end to the 
short space of freedom regained under the twenty-sixth Dynasty and 
after the Persians came a succession of conquerors, Alexander, the Pto- 
lemies, the Romans and finally the Arabs. 

In very early times the religion of ancient Egypt became polythei- 
stic and degenerated among the common people into a kind of feti- 
chism, actual worship of those animals which originally had been merely 
symbols. We are most familiar with the many-sided cult of the Sun god 
usually worshipped as a trinity, Man, Woman and Child, Osiris, Isis 
and Horus. The divinity is personified in the ox Apis but is also repre- 
sented by the reigning sovereign who was thus honoured both during 
his life-time and after death. 

Man, created by God, is called to judgment after his death and if 
found guilty is sentenced to undergo severe penalties. The soul, even if 
acquitted has to suffer many tests before becoming identified with the 
godhead and during this period of probation the soul returns many times 
to the body to continue its former life in the grave, which explains the 
efforts made to preserve the bodies intact by embalming and to furnish 
the funeral chambers with pictures and prayers for the use of the dead. 
The greater number of articles collected in our museums were found in 
tombs. Stone sarcophagi are often arranged with doors and windows as 
homes for the dead. In some cases the form of a mummy has been 
adopted to receive the painted wooden mummy-cases containing the 
tightly swathed bodies. Upon and around them amulets were placed and 
images of the gods were given them for comfort and companionship on 
the long journey to the Underworld. Four vases with covers in the shape 
of animals heads (incorrectly called Canopic vases) containing the inte- 
stines of the deceased were placed beside the mummy case. Amongst the 
rolls of papyri buried with the departed was the famous Book of the 
Dead divided into one hundred and sixty five chapters describing 
the journey of the soul into the Underworld, and the equally important 
Book of Revelations which contains the liturgy used at the funeral 
ceremony. 

Egyptian Art has a curiously unmistakable quality, but distinction as 
regards time is of the utmost difficulty, and requires close study and 
great accuracy of judgment. The cult of Isis which developed out of the 
earlier trinity worship of Osiris, Isis, Horus had a great vogue all over 
the Roman empire and was responsible for many imitations, found in 
other countries, of statues and monuments in the Egyptian Style, but these 
can be readily recognised as later and unoriginal work. 

There were three varieties of ancient Egyptian caligraphy, hiero- 
glyphs, hieratic and demotic script. Hieroglyphs are pictures which 
either represent the action or article to be described in its entirety or 
express the first syllable or first letter of the word. The names of kings 
are always enclosed in cartouches. In daily use these hieroglyphs were 
constantly abbreviated and simplified and as even then the method 
seemed lengthy and ponderous, a simpler form was evolved, the hieratic. 
This in turn gave place to the demotic writing largely employed for 
private letters in which the signs practically became equivalent to letters 
of the alphabet. 



Egyptian Collection 



Description of the Egyptian Collection. 

Room I. Groundfloor. 
(The numbering is from right to left). 

On the entrance wall to the right : 

315 (1004). Grave Relief. Late work. Two women are raising a cur- 
tain in front of an altar on which is seen the bird Ba with a human 
head, the symbol of the soul. The inscription is a prayer that a cool 
north wind may blow during the Soul's wanderings. 

On the right wall : 

316 (1021). Grave Re- 
lief of Nechtmes . Abo- 
ve, the deceased is repre- 
sented praying at an al- 
tar on which the four 
Death genii are standing 
before Osiris. Below, he 
is seen at a second altar 
surrounded by his rela- 
tions. 

317 (1003). Grave Re- 
lief. Above, the deceased 
stands wrapt in prayer 
to Osiris under the jackal 
sacred to Anubis. Below, 
he is represented in the 
bosom of his family. 

318 (1019). Grave Re- 
lief of Ma-rl-i . Above, 
the deceased is represen- 
ted in the presence of 
Osiris. Below he is sea- 
ted with his family. 

On a base let into 
the wall : 

319 (980). Male Bust. 
Basalt , fine workman- 
ship. 

320. Casts of Assy- 
rian monument from Ni- 
niveh. 

321 (1072). Fragment 
of a basalt statue of the 
Saitic period. 

322 (1001). Grave Re- 
lief. Late work. Under 
the usual representation 
of the prayer to Osiris is 

the portrait of the decea- Fig. 42. Grave Relief of Abechi. 

sed in his family circle. 

325 (1068). Basalt statuette of a priest of Sais carrying a model of a 
temple within which is Osiris. 




4 6 



Ground- floor 



On the left wall: 

326 (1016). Grave Relief of Abechi with painted figures. It belongs 
to the eighteenth dynasty (Fig. 42). 

327. Basalt Head. Very fine work of the seventh century. 

328 (1036). Grave Relief with painted figures, probably eighteenth dy- 
nasty. Above, the deceased is represented with his family making sa- 
crifice to Osiris. Below, offerings are being made to the dead. 

329 (1020). Grave Relief with two Uraeus snakes on either side of a 
lotus flower. Above is the sacrifice to Osiris and his companions. Below, 
the deceased stands with his wife in the presence of four gods. 

330. Small Head in basalt. 

331 (1017). Small Grave Relief, simulating the door of a tomb. Period 
of the old kingdom. The deceased is represented sitting with his wife at 
a table spread with sacred gifts. On either side of the door are his six 
sons and only daughter. 





Fig. 43 a. Fragment of a statuette. 

332 (1002). Grave Relief, of which the upper part is broken off. Late 
work. 

333 (1022). Grave Relief with the customary representation. Found 
at Dongola in Nubia. 

334 (1000). Grave Relief of sandstone. The deceased is shewn with 
his mother and sisters bringing sacrifices to the seated Osiris. On the 
left, incense is offered to two of the departed also seated and on the 
right they receive the lustral water from the cowheaded god Hathor. 

In the middle of the room: 

335. Red granite block belonging to an Obelisk erected in Praeneste 
and found in the upper market-place there in 1797. In 1872 another 



Egyptian Collection 



47 



fragment was discovered on the same spot and is preserved at Pale- 
strina. We gather from the inscription that this obelisk was erected by 
Palikanus in the reign of Claudius Caesar in honour of Fortuna who is 
identified with the goddess Isis. 

336 (1070). Fragment of a large basalt Sarcophagus, a valuable work 
of the sixth century. The scenes illustrated on the outside are taken from 
the Book of the Lower Hemisphere and depict the stages of the under- 
world travelled by the sun during the twelve hours between his setting 
and rising. The resurrection of the dead follows the same slow course. 

337 (1069). Conical basalt block, in honour of a member of the house 
of Ramses II. In front are nine figures of mummies in bold relief; on 
the other side are more in low relief. 

338 (999). Basalt Base of a sixth century Tomb. 
In the vestibule, to the right: 

339 (1078). 'Marble Fragment with the head of a goddess. 




Fig. 43 b. Fragment of a statuette. 

Basement 

In the basement will be found a considerable number of cast from 
important antiques , the originals of which are in other museums. They 
are placed here for purposes of comparison but in this condensed edition 
of the catalogue no mention is made of them individually. 

Fourth Room 

Central Glass Case : 

365 (1065). Fragment of a Basalt Statuette, entirely covered with hie- 
roglyphs. It probably belongs to the same period as the Naophorus at 
the Vatican Museum. (Seventh or sixth century B. C.) (Fig. 43). 



48 Basement 

Fifth Room 

368 (978). Male Bust of granite with incomplete inscription. 
To the right: 

369. Case containing sundry small objects notably amulets worn round 
the neck or sewn on the bands and the linen coverings of mummies. 

370. Case near Window. Large and small amulets forming necklaces. 

371. Case opposite. Necklaces, eyes, etc. 

373. Next Case. Painted cardboards, sandals, etc. 

375-376. In the other cases are small amulets of various shapes. 

On the walls are hung framed fragments of papyri. For uses of pa- 
pyri see below. 

378-381. Different examples of Caligraphy. Notice especially N. 380, 
a portion of the Book of the Dead. N. 381 is the transcription of a 
Greek text. 

Sixth Room 

382. Isis and Horus. Late relief. 

383. Wall cases containing Statuettes, death-masks, metal caskets etc. 
depicting the dead. 

On the case are Heads and Vases. 

Leaning against the wall : 

387, 388 (2343). Wooden Sarcophagus Lids. 

In the big glass case: 

389-394 (2348, 2340-2343). Wooden Sarcophagi containing mummies. 

To the left, outside the case : 

395 (2346). Cover of a Sarcophagus. 

In the centre of the room. 

396,. 397 (2338). Sarcophagus with mummy. 

Near it: 

398 (2338). Mummy of a Crocodile. 

Against the wall opposite entrance, to the right : 

399. Glass case containing statuettes found in tombs. 

On the case: 

400-404. So-called Canopic vases. See p. 44. 
405-407. Stone animals. 

408. Glass case containing figures, statuettes, mummy wrappings, fu- 
neral vases etc. 

On the case : 

409-414. Funeral vases etc. 

Near the window. 

417. Glass case with quantities of nschebliu (statuettes found in tombs). 



Egyptian Collection Terracottas 49 

418 (1059). Fragment of a Naopharos of basalt. 
419. Glass case containing tomb statuettes, mummified cats and other 
animals. 

On the case : 

420-424. Various sculptured fragments. 

Near the entrance : 

425 (1063). Naopharos. 



Terracottas 

Room I. 

To the left : 

427. First case. Architectural Terracottas found at Velletri in 1784, 
acquired by the Museum , together with the Borgia Collection. Trium- 
phal processions, races, fights, feasting and religious ceremonies are all 
represented. The original colouring has unfortunately disappeared. 

Below: Terracotta moulds. Pierced reliefs. 
Near the window: 

428, 429 (22383, 22242). Lower portions of a male statue brought as a 
votive offering on recovery from some illness. 

430, 431 (22246, 22296). Praying women. Observe traces of colouring. 

432, 433 (24232). Lid of Sarcophagus. Recumbent figures of a man and 
his wife, true to life. The woman's ornaments are noteworthy. 

434 (24224). Slab of a Frieze with gorgons. The holes are for faste- 
ning purposes. 

435. Show case to the right of the window. Architectural terracottas 
from the Temple of Apollo in Metapontum, with a lion head as water- 
spout. Struggle between Hercules and Nereus. 

To the right in the show case near the door: 

436. Votive offerings, heads, hands and other limbs. 
In the corner : 

437-348. Feeding vessel for dormice which were considered a delicacy 
by the Romans. On top, a child in swaddling clothes. 

Opposite the window: 

439. Show case with architectural Terracottas. 

440. Ditto. Some retain traces of colour. 
In the middle of the room: 

441. Cork Models of the temples at Paestum. The older of the two, 
usually called the Basilica , but recently acknowledged to be a temple 
of Poseidon, has nine pillars in front and a row of pillars down the cen- 
tre. The other, less well preserved , is the so-called Temple of Ceres. 

4 



Basement 



Room II. 



To the left of the door: 



442. Show case containing single Statuettes and groups in terracotta. 
Above are heads and below (20247:) Perseus rescuing Andromeda, 110340: 
Men carrying a litter, (110338:) Aeneas with Anchises and Ascanius, Gla- 
diators, Medea in a chariot drawn by serpents, Europa on the bull, an 
elephant with a tower (Fig. 44), a drunken virago, and others. 

At the window: 

443, 444 (22321, 22322). Vo- 
tive Statues. 

445, 446 (22248, 22249). Ac- 
tors with masks. 

447, 448 (24230, 24231). Two 
Sarcophagus lids. 

449. Second Show case: Sta- 
tuettes of the Hellenistic pe- 
riod. 

450. Third Show case con- 
taining statuettes , some with 
traces of colouring. Above are 
heads and busts. 

In the corner: 

451. 452 (22294, 24228). Sta- 
tue of a woman with a youth 

carrying a pig. 

Opposite the window: 

453. Fourth Showcase. Abo- 
ve are heads and busts. Statuette 
of a man feeling his own pulse 
(probably Hippocrates). Within, 
figures of animals, fruits, masks 
and actors. 

In the corner: 

454, 455 (22295, 24227). Two 
statuettes, female and male. 

456. Fifth Show case. Etruscan funerary urns, busts and statuettes. 

In the middle of the room: 

457 (22381). Well head in the form of a round tower with Bacchic 
scenes, from the Temple of Isis at Pompeii. 

458 (126255). Table leg representing Atlas. 

459 (24256). Bust of a youth with a cloak. 

460 (22382). Well head in the shape of a pillar. 




Fig. 44. Elephant with tower. 



The PrehistoHc Collection The Marble Statues 51 

The Prehistoric Collection. 

First Room (farthest of all). 

In the centre : 

461, 462. Two glass cases of which the one nearest the window con- 
tains objects found in the cave of Pertosa (Prov. Salerno). That on the 
right contains similar articles from the caves of Zachito and Pertosa and 
the rock tombs of Matera. In the small cupboard to the right of the 
window are shown vases from Pertosa. Besides the terracottas various 
articles of stone, horn and copper should be observed. Particularly no- 
teworthy are the lumps of clay from Zachito which were strung on willow 
twigs, brought to the caves and there preserved for making the clay vases. 

In the vaulted niche : 

463. Objects from pre Hellenic Cumae. The vases made by hand still 
show relationship to the work of the Cave-dwellers. Amongst the bronzes 
the different kinds of fibulae and weapons should be noticed. Necklaces 
of glass, paste and amber point to Oriental influence. No trace of Greek 
origins. 

To the right of the window : 

464. Wall case. Vases from Cumae and Pertosa. 

To the left of the window : 

465-467. Other wall cases with diverse objects from the Capitanata. 

Opposite : 

468, 469. Cases containing stone implements from Egypt and India. 

470-472. In the cases against the walls are exhibited the results of 
the recent systematic excavations : first those from the graves of Cumae, 
then those found at Suessula (Acerra) and finally those from Capua. 

Second Room. 

473. Cases round the walls contain the objects found during the exca- 
vations undertaken in Striano, San Marzano and San Valentino. The 
settlement in Striano is rather older than the two others. Its inhabitants 
took possession of vases with geometric designs from the Greek colonies, 
while in San Marzano and San Valentino archaic Corinthian vases and 
Etruscan bucchero vases have been found. It seems questionable whether 
the graves were buried during an earlier eruption of Vesuvius. 

In the centre of the room : 

474, 475. Two graves from S. Marzano, where the custom of inhuma- 
tion prevailed. 

Near the window : 

476. Bronze objects belonging to the old Museum Collections. 

We now return to the ground floor and enter the 

Hall of the Pallas. 

477 (6321). Statue of Pallas. It has suffered from restoration and re- 
working. The type is derived from Phidias but has been greatly altered. 
The little aegis in the shape of a crescent is noteworthy. 



Ground-floor 



478 (6255). Apollo Musagetes. The head does not belong to the body 
and the hands are restorations. 

479. Lower part of a Leda. With her draperies she seeks to protect 
the swan from a pursuing eagle. The motive can be traced back to Ti- 
motheus. 

480. Fragment of a Group. Aphrodite on a ram. It was used as an 
ornament for a fountain. 

481. Female Torso in Ionic chiton with high girdle. The two uplifted 
hands probably held the himation. 

482. Lower part of a Female Statue. 

483 (6319). Statue of Pallas. The arms are restored. The figure is 
derived from the Parthenos of Phidias but belongs to the Hellenistic period. 

484. Torso of a Leda, pressing the swan to her breast. 

485. Torso of a Female Statue, probably Aphrodite. 

486. Torso of Apollo with the cithara. 

487. Torso of a Male Statue, probably a Satyr. 

488. Torso of a Alan Archaistic. 

489. Torso of a Woman, an Amazon or personification of Rome. 

490. Torso of a youthful Satyr. 

491. Torso of the Apollo Sauroctonus of Praxiteles. 

492. Torso of a Youth, leaning on his left arm. 

493. Torso of a Male Statue, the so-called Narcissus of the school of 
Polyclitus. 

494. Torso of a Woman. 

495. Torso of Eros bending his bow. 

496 (6371). Statuette of Cybele, seated on a throne ; near her are two 
lions. 

497. Torso of Aesculapius, of a type deriving from Phidias. 

498. Relief of Jupiter Ammon, leaning with his left hand upon a rock. 
The head is missing. It was probably a pediment figure. 

499 (6265). Statue of Zeus with the thunderbolt. The arms are restored. 
This frequently recurring type is derived from Phidias. Poor execution. 

Hall of Cupid with the Dolphin. 

500 (6375). Group of Cupid with a Dolphin. The Cupid, whose head 
and feet are restored, has thrown himself on to a dolphin who is to bear 
him through the waves, but is held so fast that he cannot make any use 
of his wings and is consequently forced to follow all the dolphin's mo- 
vements through the water. Roman copy of a Hellenistic motive. The 
group was used to ornament a fountain. 

501 (6827). Statue of a dancing Faun. The arms are restored. 

502 (6689). Relief. Orestes, having slain his mother, is seeking refuge 
at the altar of Apollo in Delphi and is represented stepping across the 
bodies of the sleeping Furies who surround the altar. 

503. Torso of Athena. The right hand probably held the spear, while 
the left arm was outstretched. 

504. Statue of a Woman, wrapped in her cloak. 

505. Torso of a Woman clad in chiton and himation. 



The Marble Statues 53 



506 (6268). Colossal Female Head, replica of the so-called Hera Lu- 
dovisi. Roman copy of a fourth century statue, the original type having 
been produced in the school of Phidias. 

507. Torso of a nude man. 

508 (6224). Head and part of the breast of a man, incorrectly named 
Capaneus or Laocoon. It is a Giant and of the 2d. Pergamene school. 

509. Lower part of a female statue. Near her an altar. 

510 (6315). Bust of Dionysus. 

511. Torso of Aphrodite. 

512 (2099). Torso of Aphrodite. 

518 (6266). Torso of a seated Woman; the head was inserted. 

514 (6680). Fragment of a Relief, of which only the torso is antique. 

515 (6100). Statue of a Woman, the head and right forearm are mis- 
sing. The left hand held a mask. It is probably a Melpomene. Coarse 
execution. 

516 (6674). Sarcophagus, decorated with battles of Amazons. 

517. Torso of a Woman. The head was veiled, the right arm hung 
down and the left was raised. 

518 (6215). Torso of a Woman. The right arm was raised. 

519. Lower part of a Female Statue. 

520. Statue of a Woman. Head and arms are missing. It belongs to 
the Hellenistic period. 

521 (6686). Relief. Perseus and Andromeda. In his left hand Perseus 
holds the Head of Medusa, the sight of which has just caused the death 
of the dragon. With his right hand Perseus assists Andromeda to descend 
from the rock. Hellenistic relief. After a painting. 

522 (6390). Head of a bearded man. Probably a reproduction of Me- 
nelaus in the group of Menelaus and Patroclus. 

523. Headless Statue of Cybele with her lions. 

524 (6859). Fragment of a Candelabra with delicate ornamentation. 

525 (6379). Colossal Head, much restored. Probably an emperor cha- 
racterised as Hercules. 

526 (6684). Fragment of a Sarcophagus. Dionysus, accompanied by 
his troupe, advances towards the left. Hellenistic. 

527. Fragment. The man is seated on a rock. 

528 (6217). Torso. The youth's left arm is raised, while the right arm 
hangs down. 

529. Torso of a dancing Faun. 

530 (6354). Male Statue of which only the torso is antique. The youth 
is clad in a very fine chiton and nebris and may therefore be recognised 
as Dionysus or a Satyr. He was originally represented dancing. The style 
is of the fourth century. The statue may be compared with the Albani 
Maenad attributed to Scopas. 

Hall of the Scylla. 

531 (6672). Table Pedestal. At either end are figures of Scylla and a 
Centaur in the round, continued at the sides in relief. The Centaur par- 
ticularly is much restored. In the case of Scylla the woman's body ends 



54 Ground-floor 



in fish tails under which are seen the heads of three dogs holding hu- 
man limbs in their jaws. Scylla is tearing her hair. The Centaur on the 
other side is tamed by a Cupid on his back. It is considered that Scylla 
and the Centaur appear here as guardians of Hades. The style is Hel- 
lenistic. 

532-535 (120129, 120175, 6671, 6676). Four Well-heads decorated with 
oak, olive, vine and ivy leaves. 

536-539 (6499, 110004, 110005, 6439). Four herms, used as ornaments 
in a Pompeian garden. Compare the House of the Vettii. 

540 (6300). Statue of Venus, of which only the torso is antique, the 
rest being either re-worked or restored. She is nude except for the cloak 
wrapped round her legs. Near her stands a Cupid with a shell. 

541-544 (6363-6366). Four Busts of River Gods as is indicated by the 
waves beneath. Perhaps used as ornaments for a fountain. 

545. Group of a Satyr seizing a Hermaphrodite who endeavours to 
disengage himself by force. Much corroded. 

546-549(6545,6423, 111391,6425). Four Busts. They were used to 
ornament a garden. 

550 (6857). Three-sided Candelabra, decorated with figures of animals, 
and resting on three rams. 

551 (6858). Candelabra. On the sides are Apollo with his cithara, 
Pythia and Nike. 

Beneath the window : 

552-553. Two dogs scratching themselves. 

On the wall : 

554. Architectural Fragments. 

555 557 (6569, 6566, 6567). Slabs of a relief, figures of animals. 

558 (6736). Relief. A bearded man, resembling Zeus, is seated in front 
of a tent and holds a knotty staff. Close by is a sheep. At his side is a 
scrinium on which lie rolls. 

559 (6607, 6608, 6610-6618, 6624, 6625, 6628, 124906). Masks in high 
relief. They were used as wall decoration, water-spouts, etc. 

560-563 (6621, 6639, 6631, 6633). Four rectangular oscilla with masks. 

566 (6575). Relief, representing a shop or a kitchen. A bearded man 
is weighing something on large scales while two others are occupied in 
dividing a big piece of meat (?). To the right are cooking utensils ; a 
man is cleaning a plate. 

567 (6690). Relief, two women playing with a bird. 

568 (6679). Relief of the initiation of Hercules into the Eleusinian 
mysteries. A priest and a Kore are present. 

569 (6691). Relief. Man on horseback holding a woman in front of 
him. He is being led towards a statuette of Hercules. 

570 (6692). Relief. A warrior with a sword driving a biga. 
571-574 (6637, 6640, 6634, 109288). Round Oscilla. They were suspended 

from garlands between columns. They could be turned and both sides 
were consequently decorated with reliefs. They swung to and fro in the 
wind, hence their name. 

575 (6687). Relief representing a scene from a comedy. The old man 
is being restrained with great difficulty from giving way to his inclination 



The Marble Statues 



to lean upon his son, who is himself hardly able to stand upright and 
is supported by a slave. A stage is indicated in the background. 

576 (6716). Fragment of a high relief. An old woman is endeavouring 
to extract a thorn from the foot of a goat-herd. 

577 (6714). Fragment of Oscillum with a rider. 

578 (6688). High Relief. A youth holding a lyre is being drawn on to 
a couch by dancing-girls and hetairae. All the heads have been restored. 
The relief reveals the hand of an artist of the Alexandrian period, re- 
calling Praxiteles. 

Hall of the Atlas. 

579 (6374). Statue of Atlas. The face and right foot are restorations. 
He supports the celestial globe upon his shoulders, and maintains his 
equilibrium with difficulty under that weight. The constellations are re- 
presented on the globe. The statue may perhaps have been used to or- 
nament a fountain. 

580. Torso of a Man, with cloak and sword-belt. Roman period. 

581 (6702). Pediment relief with the bust of Minerva. 

582. Frieze with eagles, garlands and lions. 

583 (3002). Monument to Torinia with a battle-scene. 

584. Torso of the statue of a warrior. Replica of a Lysippean motive. 

585 (6704). Large Relief. Above, a procession of gladiators, in the 
middle their combats against each other, below, against animals. 

586 (6222). Torso of a Man. The head is turned to the right, the 
right hand is raised and probably held a spear. Hellenistic. 

587 (6703). Pediment relief with the bust of Zeus. Cp. 581. 

588 (6677). Small Sarcophagus, ornamented with Cupids carrying the 
drunken Silenus. 

589-590. Architectural Fragments, two being decorated with fantastic 
figures of animals. 

591 (6213). Torso of a Warrior, who wears a richly decorated cuirass. 
In the centre is a trophy with Victories and two prisoners. 

592. Similar Torso. The cuirass is ornamented with a trophy placed 
between two Victories sacrificing bulls. 

593 (6681). Relief. Artemis with sceptre and dog. 

594 (6722). Relief of a Roman triumphal procession. 

559 (6683). Relief. A Roman and his wife portrayed as Hercules and 
Omphale, with scenes of the Labours of Hercules. 

596 (6685). Silenus on an ass in a Bacchic procession. 

597 (6712). Slab of a Sarcophagus with the representation of a race. 
The charioteers are cupids and in the background the Spina with its 
different monuments and apparatus is clearly recognisable*. 

598 ((5693). Sarcophagus with representation of a Bacchic procession. 
Silenus reclines on a car drawn by asses. Round about him are Satyrs 
and Maenads. The car of Dionysus is drawn by a male and a female 
Centaur The whole procession advances towards the right, where lies 
Ariadne, forsaken by Theseus. Eros draws the attention of a satyr to 
the sleeping Ariadne. 

599. Small Cinerary Urn decorated with flowers. 



56 Ground-floor 



600 (6228). Torso of a Man clad in a chlamys. A palm served as 
support. 
. 601, 602 (6216, 6219). Two dogs lying at rest. 

603 (6220). Torso of a male statue. On its left side are the remains 
of some rounded object, possibly a bow. The right arm is raised. 

604 (6756). Sarcophagus, divided in front into five panels. In the centre 
is Zeus enthroned, near him Hera, Apollo, and some of the Muses. On 
the sides, others of the Muses are represented. 

605, 606 (6600, 6601). Two fragments of a Relief. On each one is a 
trireme. They must have adorned some curved building. 

607 (6302). Statue of a Man, restored without reason as Hermes. Me- 
diocre execution. 

Hall of the Zeus. 

608. Torso of an Emperor, of severe type. There was a support under 
the left leg. 

609-612 (6740, 6743, 6759, 6773, 6770, 6768). Fragments of a parapet, 
placed on the walls of the room. The subjects are personifications of 
cities, Hercules wrestling with Antaeus, sacrifice to Ares, Eros mena- 
ced by Athena. 

613 (6701). Sarcophagus. The tablet for the name is held up by Cen- 
taurs. Beneath are seated figures of conquered provinces. 

614. Torso of a Toga statue, the head of which was made separately. 

615 (6742). Fragment of a parapet. Omphale and Hercules. Cp. N. 609. 

616 (6214). Torso of a Colossal Statue. The left arm was raised. 

617 (6581). Fragments of a Sarcophagus. Polyphemus and Ulysses. 

618 (6227). Torso of a Colossal Female Statue. An Amazon, or a perso- 
nification of Rome in the costume of an Amazon. Magnificent Roman work. 

619 (6741). Fragment of a parapet with sacrifice of a bull. Cp. N. 609. 

620 (6580). Fragment of a Sarcophagus. Polyphemus and Ulysses. 

621 (6221). Torso of a Colossal Male Statue. 
622-624 (6775, 6774, 6758). Fragments. Cp. 609. 
625. Torso of a man clad in a cloak. 

626 (6323). Seated statue of a Youth whose sword lies on the ground 
before him. Hence the restoration as Ares, but it is now thought to be 
Achilles about to play the lyre. Work of Pergamene school. 

627, 628 (6754, 6755). Fragments of a parapet with battles of Centaurs 
and scenes in which Satyrs figure. Cp. N. 609. 

629 (6598). Sarcophagus. The female portrait bust has never been 
finished. The woman was to have been represented as a Muse. On either 
side, centaurs and Nereids. Roman wholesale work. 

630 (6766). Front of a Sarcophagus with hunting scenes. 

631. Torso of a seated man. 

632. Fragment of a Relief. Paris with the Phrygian cap. 
633-636 (6746, 6761, 6799, 6746). Fragments of a parapet, with re- 
presentations of a myth of Artemis, Amazons and Actaeon. Cp. 609. 

637 (6767). Fragments of a Relief, representing a triumphal proces- 
sion. Good workmanship of the time of Hadrian. 



The Marble Statues 57 



638 (6765). Fragments of a Relief with captive barbarians. 

639 (6584). Fragments of a Sarcophagus. Dionysus contemplating A- 
riadne. Good execution. 

640 (6606). Lid of a Sarcophagus with Bacchic procession. 

641 (6586). Fragments of a Sarcophagus with Centaurs and Nereids. 

642 (110565). Fragment of a Relief. Two ships manned by barbarian 
(Etruscan ?) warriors. 

643. Lower portion of a colossal seated statue, probably Zeus. Good 
copy of a Greek original. 

644 (6263). Statue of a seated Woman. The head is restored. She re- 
sembles the Hera Giustiniani in the Museo delle Terme. 

645 (6744). Fragments of a parapet with the Calydonian hunt. Cp. 
N. 609. 

646 (6583). Fragment of a Relief. Two barbarian women with gifts. 

647 (6596). Fragment of a Sarcophagus with Bacchic procession. 

648 (6124). Statue of a man. Only the torso is antique, and it must 
have belonged to the statue of a emperor who wore a cuirass ornamented 
with figures of Zeus and two Corybantes. The restorer has done his work 
taking as model the Capitoline Ares. 

649-654 (6750, 6747, 6760, 6749, 6772). Fragments of a parapet. Cy- 
bele and Atys, the punishment of Marsyas, Apollo with the cithara. 
Cp. N. 609. 

655 (6579). Sarcophagus with the representation of Hippolytus and 
Phaedra. To the right Hippolytus hunting. Late and coarsely executed 
replica. 

656 (6748). Fragment of a parapet; priest of Cybele, dancing. Cp. 
N. 609. 

657 (6119). Statue of a hunter with spoils of the chase. Roman copy. 

658 (6745). Fragment of a parapet. Procession of eight priests, most 
of them are bearded. Cp. N. 609. 

659 (6719). Sarcophagus Relief, representing the Calydonian hunt. 

660 (6711). Sarcophagus, with representation of the myth of Pelops 
and Oenomaus. Fourth century. 

661 (31). Male Torso. Part of the garment has been executed se- 
parately. 

662 (10833). Ferdinand IV, King of Naples, by Canova. 

Corridor of the Coloured Marble Statues. 

663-664 (5989, 5995). Columns of verde antico. (Similar columns have 
been placed near the three other doors of this hall). 

665 (6278). Statue of Diana of Ephesus, whose body is adorned with 
figures of animals in six rows. The statue has four rows of breasts. 
There was a similar statue in the Temple of Diana on the Aventine 
and another at Lake Nemi. The Naples statue is the best one preserved 
to us. 

666 (6115). Statue of a Persian, executed in coloured marbles. He is 
represented in Oriental costume. It served as a support. This is perhaps 
a copy of a Pergamene original. 

667 (6117). Similar Statue. 



58 Ground-floor 



668 (6764). Relief with dedicatory inscription. Mithras is slaying the 
bull, who is attacked at one and the same moment by a dog, a serpent 
and a scorpion. 

669 (6225). Tiger or Panther, suckling its young. 

670 (6280). Statuette of a Woman, represented in downward flight. 
She grasps the upper part of the drapery of her garment with both 
hanfls, while her cloak floats around her. She is generally called Artemis, 
but may be a Nike. Both hands are restored. 

671 (6723). Relief of Mithras sacrificing a bull. Cp. N. 668. 

672 (6223). Tiger or Panther. The eyes were inserted separately. 

673 (6118). Statuette of a Persian. It was used as a table support. 

674 (6710). Relief. Apollo with the cithara. A votive offering to Apollo 
and the Nymphs. This relief and others similar to it were found at Ischia 
in the shrine of the nymph Nitrodes. 

675 (6262). Statue of Apollo. He rests his left hand on his cithara which 
he has placed on a pillar. His right arm is thrown above his head. Both 
hands are restorations. The type belongs to the fourth century. 

676 (6709). Relief. Apollo with the Nymphs. Cp. N. 674. 

677 (6385). Statue of a Man. Only the torso is antique. It has been 
restored as Meleager, but the position of the head differs from that of 
the Meleager by Scopas. 

678 (6708). Relief. Eros and Anteros in combat for the palm of 
victory. 

681. Well-head with ornamentation in relief. 

682 (6735). Fragment of a Relief with two nymphs. 

683 (6762). Sarcophagus. Dionysus supported by a satyr, and maenads. 

684 (6732). Relief, three nymphs between the Dioscuri. 

685. Statue of Nike. The head , arms and feet were probably made 
separately and of white marble. The hands were outstretched and very 
likely held the palm of victory and a wreath. The artist has perhaps 
copied a Nike from those that were used as acroteria in Epidaurus. 

687 (6751). Relief. Apollo is standing near a laurel tree with his ci- 
thara. Close by are two nymphs, one of them holding a shell in which 
a woman (Capellina) is bathing her hair. 

688 (6782). Candelabra, the pedestal of which is supported by three 
chimeras. 

689 (6706). Relief, Apollo with the cithara. Near him are nymphs 
watering plants. 

690 (4189). Cinerary Urn. A man, feasting, reclining on his couch; at 
his feet his wife is seated. 

693 (4185). Cinerary Urn, ornamented with heads of Ammon, eagles 
and a griffin. 

694 (6752). Relief. Apollo with a cithara near a laurel tree and three 
nymphs with shells and a hydria. 

695 (6781). Candelabra, richly decorated with sacrificial implements 
etc. At the corners stand three swans with curved necks. Very fine 
execution and evidently intended for an important temple. 

696 (6721). Relief. Three nymphs and Apollo, with the cithara. 

697 (6120). Cinerary Urn with symbols of Apollo. 



The Marble Statues 59 



698 (6720). Apollo, with the cithara, and three nymphs. 

999 (111800). Sarcophagus, curved at the ends. In the centre is a 
shield with the bust of a woman, upheld by Tritons. The inscription is 
on the lid. 

700 (6707). Relief. Apollo with nymphs. 

701. Altar, decorated with ox heads and garlands. 

704 (2929). Grave stone. In a niche is the figure of a priestess of 
Isis. Flavian period. 

705 (975). Statue of Serapis. The hands are restorations. The god is 
seated on a throne and wears a chiton and cloak, the latter being thrown 
round his legs. He holds a sceptre with his left hand, his lowered right 
hand perhaps held a patera. On his head he wears a modius. Near him 
sits a dog with three heads and with a snake round its neck. The 
Zeus-like type of Serapis is a creation of Bryaxis who produced in A- 
lexandria a statue of very costly materials after the type of the Pluto 
of Sinope, which statue has served as model for all subsequent statues 
of Serapis. This copy was found in Pozzuoli and does not equal the 
others in beauty. 

706 (981). Statue of Anubis, the Egyptian Anpu, to whose lot it fell to 
watch the graves of the departed. The head of a jackal has been placed 
on the body of a Hermes. Mediocre workmanship. 

707 (6281). Seated Statue of Apollo. The head and all the extremities 
are restored and ought to have been added in bronze. The god is seated 
on a rock and wears theatrical costume, namely a long sleeved chiton and 
a cloak fastened at the shoulders. In his left hand he holds the cithara 
and in his right a plectrum. This is a carefully executed copy of a fourth 
century original. 

708 (6372). Statue of Isis. The head and extremities have been re- 
stored in white marble. The costume is the usual one of a chiton with 
wide sleeves and the cloak is fringed. It is a good Roman copy. 

709 (6368). Statue of a Woman. The head, hands and legs are resto- 
rations. She resembles Hera or Demeter but the attributes in the hands 
may denote Isis. She wears a veil. 

710 (6370). Statue of Isis. Again the restorations of head, hands and 
feet have been executed in white marble. The goddess wears a long 
chiton with sleeves , and has wrapped the so-called Kalasiris round the 
lower part of her body, while her fringed cloak hangs down her back. 
In her right hand she held the sistrum, a kind of rattle. Alexandrian 
work. 

In the Garden. 

711. Statue of Aphrodite. The head and right hand are missing. The 
figure is derived from the Cnidian statue, but has undergone certain al- 
terations which are best representated in the Aphrodite of Syracuse. 

712-750. Round the walls are grave stones, honorary bases, and 
other inscriptions from Pozzuoli, Capua and other places. Certain cu- 
riously shaped grave cippi from Pompeii deserve attention. Most of 
them have smooth fronts for inscriptions but behind they show the roun- 
ded shape of the head and hair. 



Ground-floor 



West Wing. 
The Bronzes. 



The Bronzes of the National Museum are unique. The greater part 
were found at Herculaneum and most of these are from one splendid 
villa outside the town, the property of some rich Roman landowner who 
had evidently collected a whole gallery of the finest examples of sculpture 
in marble and bronze. This treasure trove richly repaid the great labour 
and cost of the excavations, for which underground passages had to be 
made owing to the depth of the accumulated earth and with a view to 
ensuring the safety of the houses thus undermined. Gradually the details 
of the discovery were forgotten and the report became current that the 
city of Herculaneum had been a notable art-centre, far surpassing the 
neighbouring towns in the possession and appreciation of works of art. 
It is to the credit of G. de Petra to have demonstrated that all these 
masterpieces came out of this one villa which was excavated from 1750 
to 1795. 

Corridor of the Bronze Horse. 

First Section, to the left: 

755 (5597). Statue of M. Calatorius , clad in a toga , under the right 
eye a wart. He belonged to a well-known family in Herculaneum. The 
statue was erected to him by his fellow citizens. 

759 (5612). Statue Of a Woman dressed in a tunic and palla, the 
latter being drawn over her head. The hair is dressed after the manner 
of the Claudian period. 

761 (5606). Portrait Bust of an old man. The hair of the head and 
the beard are differently treated. The manner of wearing the beard is 
reminiscent of the Flavian period. 

On the right: 

762 (5587). Head of a Flamen, identified as such on account of the 
peculiar close-fitting head-dress of which the apex is missing. 

Second Section, on the left : 

765, 766 (5591, 3740). Statue of L. Mammius Maximus, once a priest of 
Augustus. The attributes originally held in his hand are lost. 

On the right : 

770 (5599). Statue of a Woman. Her coiffure reminds one of Antonia, 
the mother of Claudius. She perhaps held a patera in her right hand and 
in her left an incense-box. 

On the left : 

778 (5013). Female Statuette, representing either Demeter or Hera. 
The cloak is drawn up over her head but leaves the diadem visible. She 
held a sceptre and a patera in her hands. From the hollow back we con- 
clude that, like N. 774, 782, 783, she was attached to the chariot of the 
Quadriga from Herculaneum. 

On the right : 

774 (5004). Statuette of a Youth wearing a cuirass under a chlamys. 
His right hand is raised as though holding a spear. He has been iden- 
tified as Caligula. Cp. N. 773. 



The Bronzes 61 

Third Section, in the centre : 

775 (4904). Bronze Horse, the only remains of a splendid quadriga, 
pieced together out of innumerable fragments. Note the inscription by 
Mazocchi on the base. For the ornamentation of the quadriga see N. 773. 
Many further fragments of the chariot, horses and charioteer have been 
recently discovered by Gabriel. 

Against the pillars to the left : 

782 (5016). Statuette of a young God, resembling Apollo. He may have 
held a sceptre in his right hand. Cp. N. 773. 

To the right: 

783 (5005). Statuette of a Youth, which also served to adorn the qua- 
driga. Cp. N. 773. 

Fourth Section, on the left : 

785 (5589). Statue of a Woman, evidently a worshipper, as is indicated 
by her veiled head and outstretched arms. The motive is the invention 
of Euphranor or some other artist of the fourth century. This statue is 
the best of the female portraits found at Herculaneum. 

On the right : 

788 (5609). Statue of a Woman, erroneously entitled Livia or Domitia, 
but really belonging to the time of the Claudians. 

Against the pillar to the left : 

790 (5586). Male Portrait Bust called, for no reason, Sulla. 
On the right : 

791 (5601). Bust of an unknown Man, clean-shaven, eyes inset. 
Fifth Section, on the left : 

793 (5615). Statue of Tiberius, judging by the shape of the head and 
chin. Falsely supposed to represent the elder Drusus. This statue is one 
of the finer works. 

On the right : 

796, 797 (5493, 3718). Statue of Claudius, identified by the inscription. 
The left hand, forehead and hair are restored and the statue is patched 
in many places. 

At the end of the corridor : 

800 (115390). Horse's head with remains of gilding. It is from one of 
the six equestrian statues found in the Theatre. 

Opposite : 

801 (115391). Horse's head belonging to the Quadriga. Cp. N. 775. 

Corridor of the Antinous. 

802 (5595). Statue of Augustus. Rather poor work. The likeness how- 
ever is recognisable by the shape of the head and the treatment of the 
hair. The Emperor is represented at the age of about forty, at the time 
of the battle of Actium. 

On the left: 

803 (5635). Equestrian Statue, pieced together out of fragments found 
near the eastern Arch of the Forum of Pompeii. The identification as 
Caligula or Nero is arbitrary. 



Ground-floor 



On the left wall : 

804 (4992). Roman Portrait Bust. Observe the remarkable thickness 
of the patina. Eyes inset. A mediocre work. 

805 (5584). Herm, identified by Mau as Claudius Marcellus. The sickly 
features which are prominent in the portrait would be in agreement with 
his bodily condition. The head resembles the statue of Marcellus which 
was erected in the Macellum. 

806 (4990). Female Bust with eyes 
inset. The short curly hair suggests the 
Claudian period. 

807 (5617). Head of Tiberius. Poor 

work. 

Opposite the West Entrance of the 
Museum : 

808 (126170). Statue of Perseus. A 

strongly-built youth is standing at ease, 
the right hand on his hip, and the left 
hanging at his side. The cloak drawn 
across the back from the left shoulder 
to the right hand is a separate piece of 
work. A band passing under the chin 
was intended to secure some object at- 
tached to the head with lead. As small 
wings were fastened to the feet it is 
assumed that wings were also attached 
to the head and hence the conjectured 
title Perseus though it might also re- 
present Hermes. It is of good work- 
manship and can be traced to a Lysip- 
pean model (Fig. 45). 

On the wall to the right : 

809 (4989). Bust of an unknown 
personage. 

810 (110663). Herm of Caecilius Ju- 
cundus the celebrated banker of Pom- 
peii in whose house the famous wax 
tablets were found (Cp. N. 1911). This 
portrait must have been a speaking li- 
keness (Fig. 46). 

811 (5014). Statuette of a youth in 

a tunic, wearing a cuirass ornamented 
with figures inlaid in silver. His bea- 
ring is imperial but the assumption 

represents the emperor Caligula is probably incorrect. 

813 (5632, 5633). Two Busts of unknown personages. 




. 

Fig. 43. Statue of Perseus 
that he 
812, 



Large Bronzes. Room I. 

In the middle on a marble table near the window : 
814 (5002). Dancing Faun found in the House of the Faun >, at Pom- 
peii, which was consequently so called. He is represented not as drunk 
but as performing a rhythmic dance. This wonderfully executed work of 
art may be regarded as a Greek original. 



The Bronzes 



815 (111495). Faun with wine-skin. Discovered in the house del Cen- 
tenario in Pompeii. He wears a wreath of fir twigs and has pointed 
ears and a long tail. He holds a full wineskin under his left arm the 
contents of which he lets flow or checks at will according to the pressure 
exerted by the left hand on the mouth of the wine-skin. 

816 (5001). Drunken Silenus, intended as a stand for a vase, of which 
the fragments were found close at hand. He struggles with all his might 
to maintain his equilibrium. 

In the middle of the room : 

817 (5003). Dionysus. This un- 
usually beautiful statuette com- 
monly known as Narcissus, must 
be thus identified on account of 
the nebris and the ivy-wreath. 
The action of the god is not self- 
evident ; perhaps he is playing 
with his panther , perhaps liste- 
ning to far-away sounds (Fig. 47). 
The limbs are particularly slen- 
der, causing us to ascribe this 
work to the Hellenistic period 
though the influence of Praxite- 
les is plainly felt. A different base 
was substituted for the original 
before the eruption of Vesuvius. 

818 (111701). Cupid carrying 
a dolphin on his shoulder. Orna- 
ment for a fountain. 

819 (5000). Cupid with a duck. 
Ditto. 

On a marble table against 
the right wall: 

820-822 (4897-4901). Lion, 
Wild -boar with dogs, Serpent. Fig. 46. Caecilius Jucundus 

Group for fountain. (Phot. Brogi). 

On a marble table against the left wall : 
823, 824 (4902, 4891). Stag and Raven. Ditto. 

825 (4994). Seated Fisherman. Ornament for a fountain. 

826 (4890). Bull. Ditto. 

827 (4903). He-goat. 

The subjects of the frescoes which adorn the walls of this room are: 
Opposite the window : 

828 (9625). Dionysus with two Satyrs surrounded by cupids engrossed 
in the chase. Painting and stucco. 

On the other wall : 

829 (9596). Dionysus with Satyrs. 
On the left wall : 

830 (9595). A veiled woman stands on a dais holding a casket. In the 
space on the right is another seated figure of a woman. 




6 4 



Ground-floor 



Room II. 

In the centre towards the window : 

831 (5630). Apollo. As he still holds a plectrum in his right hand, 
his left obviously held a cithara. This bronze is a good copy of a Greek 
original of the time of Phidias. Cp. the Apollo of Mantua (Fig. 48, 49). 

In the centre of the room: 

832 (4997). Statuette of a 
flying Victory, originally su- 
spended and consequently 
able to dispense with the 
newly-added ball at her feet. 
She held a victor's palm or 
a trophy in her left hand, 
not the wand with which she 
is now represented. 

833 (4998). Statuette of 
Venus Anadyomene. She pro- 
bably held a mirror in her 
left while adjusting her hair 
with her right hand. Copy 
of a fourth century original. 

In the centre towards the 
end wall : 

834 (125348). Statue of a 
youth of Polyclitan type but 
with many individual traits. 
It is an original work and 
ascribed to the end of the se- 
vere period. Its owner evi- 
dently altered it for use as a 
candelabra , silvered it and 
put a tendril in the right 
hand from which the lamps 
could hang. It resembles the 
well-known Idolino in Flo- 
rence (Fig. 50). 

835 (5613). Statuette of A- 
pollo. The god is represented 
just interrupting his playing 
to listen to the prayers of his 
worshippers. 

On a marble pillar against 
the right wall : 

836 (4995). Bacchus and 
a Satyr. 

On a marble pillar against the left wall : 

837 (4892). Seated Hermes. 

The following paintings are on the walls: 

At the end of the room : 

838. Wall of the fourth style. Satyr and Bacchante. 




Phot. Brogi). 



The Bronzes 65 

On the left wall : 

839 (8594). Wall of the second style with architecture. 
On the right wall: 

840. Wall of the fourth style. Narcissus gazing at his reflection in 
the water. 




Fig. 48 and 49. Apollo of Mantua (Phot. Alinari). 
Room III.' 

In the centre towards the window : 

841 (5625). Hermes seated on a rock, originally holding the caduceus 
in his left hand. The wings are strapped to his feet. He has paused for 
a moment to rest but is ready at once to resume his flight through the 
air (Fig. 51). This statue is a copy of a work of Lysippus or of his school. 

842 (5624). Sleeping Satyr. His right foot is stretched out, the left 
drawn in and his right arm raised above his head. His general build, 
tail, horns, and goat's beard recall the type of Pan as rendered in the 
third century. 



66 



Ground-floor 



In the centre on the long marble table : 

843-847 (5604, 5620, 5605, 5621, 5619). The so-called Dancers from Her- 
culaneum. Probably intended for water-carriers on the point of visiting 
the spring with hydriae on their heads. They can be traced back to Pe- 
loponnesian originals of the fifth century. The shape of the bases shows 
that they were originally meant to adorn niches. The eyes were inset. In 
their hair they almost all wear a fillet inlaid with silver. The Doric peplos 
falls in stiff folds to the ground. One (N. 847) is just in the act of faste- 
ning hers on the left shoulder (Fig. 52). 

In the centre towards the end 
of the room : 

848 (5594). Bust of a young 
man, probably an athlete on ac- 
count of the olive twigs woven 
in with the fillet. 

849 (5592). Female Bust, 

wrongly called Berenice, as there 
is no resemblance with the coins 
bearing her image and super- 
scription. The lips were covered 
with a thin layer of copper. The 
hair dressed high is kept back 
by a double plait. The goddess 
Artemis has been suggested, but 
the bust is probably a portrait. 

In front of the window on 
the right : 

850 (5608). Archaic Bust of a 
youth, the remains of a statue. It 
is not clear whether this repre- 
sents Apollo or some athlete. It 
dates from the beginning of the 
fifth century. 

On the right wall : 

851 (5633). Head of a youth, 
originally wearing a fillet. The 
style of the head is Polyclitan 
but the expression and the treat- 
ment of the hair point to a some- 
what later artist. 

852 (5603). A Girl standing 
with both arms outstretched in 
the attitude of prayer. She wears 
a Doric chiton with apoptygma. 
Her hair is secured by a fillet. 
From a fifth century original. 

853 (5614). Head of the Polyclitan school, probably Hercules. 
On the left wall : 

854 (4885). Replica of the head of the Doryphorus by Polyclitus. 
Op. N. 146. This copy was executed by Apollonios , an Athenian of the 
time of Augustus. The projections at the sides served for suspending 
wreaths. 




Fig. 50. Kphebus of Pompei 
(Phot. Brogi). 



The Bronzes 



855 (5610). Head of a Youth, after a work of Polyclitus produced later 
than the Doryphorus. 

856 (4889). Bust of an Amazon, probably intended as a companion 
figure to N. 854 (Fig. 53). Perhaps a copy of one of the Ephesian amazons. 

X 857 (5618). Male Bust. The long hair is secured by a fillet and the 
treatment of both hair and beard is very mannered. Some critics wish to 
ascribe it to Scopas or Praxiteles on account of the pathetic expression 
of the countenance. Sogliano sees in it a mingling of the Dionysiac and 
Platonic types and thinks that the proper name for it is Dionysoplaton , 
who occours in greek Papiri (Fig. 54). 




Fig. 51. Resting Hermes. 

Room IV. 

In the centre towards the window : 

858 (5628). Drunken Faun. His wine-skin more than half emptied, he 
is portrayed in a recumbent attitude on a lion's skin, and is snapping 
the fingers of his right hand. 

859, 860 (4888, 4886). Two Gazelles. 

5* 



68 



Ground-floor 



In the centre towards the end of the room : 

861, 862 (5626, 5627). Two youths preparing to wrestle (Fig. 55). 

Under the window in the left corner : 
Wild Sow in full retreat. 



On the right wall : 

864-868 (5021, 5029, 5028, 5020, 5032). Little Boys with a dolphin, hy- 
dria and mask at their side, intended as ornaments for fountains. 

On the end wall: 
869-873 (5007, 5011i, 
5015, 5011, 5006). Silenus 
with a wine-skin or play- 
ing with a panther, as 
ornaments for fountains. 

On the left wall : 
874-877 (5033, 5023, 
5030, 5027, 5031). Various 
ornaments for fountains. 

Room V. 

In the centre towards 
the window : 

879 (5616). Male Bust, 
erroneously called Sene- 
ca. This masterpiece da- 
tes from a period of ab- 
solute realism and can 
be considered a product 
of post-Alexandrian sty- 
le. It appears to have 
been done from life and 
therefore the original 
must be sought amongst 
contemporary celebrities 
of the third or second 
century. That the portrait 
is of a Greek is proved 
by the shape of the beard and the surroundings in which it was disco- 
vered at Herculaneum, and this discredits the idea of Seneca whose fea- 
tures, judging by a herm of him at Berlin, were quite different from these. 
Owing to the fact that a replica found on the Palatine wears an ivy-wreath 
it has been urged that the original was a poet, wherefore Philetas of Cos, 
Callimachus and others have been suggested, though it is quite possible 
that the ivy-wreath may have been an accidental addition. The large 
number of replicas proves him to have been a person of great renown 
but his identity remains as yet undiscovered. 

880 (5602). So-called Democritus. A bearded man of advanced age 
with head bent slightly backward, the eyes thoughtfully cast down. It 
is a good portrait of the Hellenistic period but cannot be identified. 

881 (5623). So-called Heraclitus. A head showing signs of great energy. 
It is an excellent work of the Hellenistic period. 




Fig. 52. Dancers from Herculaneum. 



The Bronzes 



69 



On the right wall : 

882 (5607). So-called Archytas. This name is due to its similarity to 
a head on a false coin. The head is covered with a leathern cap whose 
rim is rolled into a band. As this head-dress was worn by athletes this 
must be looked upon as the portrait of an athlete. 

883 (5634). Bust of Scipio Africanus Major, thus called on account of 
the high temples, shorn head, toothless mouth and projecting ears, all to 
be found in another duly inscribed bust and on the coins of Gnaeus Bla- 
sius. Compare the Pompeian picture of the death of Sophonisbe. (N. 1400, 
Fig. 56). 

884 (5598). Bust of Aulus - 
Gabinius, doubtful. It is not 
certain whether the long curls 
are antique, nor whether this 
bust is of a man or woman. 
Latterly it has been thought 
to represent a Roman lady 
of the time of Claudius. 

885 (5588). Bust of a 
Greek Warrior, called by the 
members of the Academy of 
Herculaneum C. Caesar, but 
obviously a Hellenistic work. 

On the end wall : 

886 (5622). Bust of a Ro- 
man , called without reason 
Marc Aemilius Lepidus or 
Sulla. 

887 (5631). Male Bust, ve- 
ry realistic. 

On the other wall : 

888 (5596). Bust of a king 
of the Hellenic period; it has 
been identified on insufficient 

grounds as Ptolemaeus Ale- Fig. 53. Bust of an Amazon (Phot. Brogi). 

xander , as Alexander the 

Great, as his father Philip, and as King Lysimachus. 

889 (5600). Bust of Ptolemaeus Philadelphus, according to Six's pro- 
bably correct suggestion. On coins he is represented at a more advanced 
age. The bust is related to the art of Lysippus. 

890 (5590). Bust of Seleucus Nicator, so called because of its resemblance 
to coins bearing his image. A statue of him was executed by Lysippus. 

On the column to the left near the window : 

891 (4896). Female Bust, traditionally called Sappho. Undoubtedly 
a poetess. Fourth century work. (Fig. 57). 

In the glass case to the right near the window : 

892 (69762-69771). Ten tigers' heads which served as water spouts. 
To the left near the window : 

893 (5467). Small Bust of Demosthenes, with inscription. Mediocre work. 




Ground-floor 



894 (5468). Small Bust of Zeno with inscription (300 B. C.). 

895 (5471). Small Bust of Metrodorus (330-277 B. C.), the friend of 
Epicurus. 

896 (5470). Small Bust of Epicurus. 

897 (5474). Bust of a Woman of the Claudian period. 

898 (25494). Sun-dial in the form of a ham, the pig's tail serving as 
pointer. 

899 (5296). Statuette of a bearded Satyr, blowing the flute and accom- 
panying himself with the scabellum, an instrument played with the foot. 

900 (5466). Small Bust of 

BHHMHMBMBMgag gBHHMHIH ^ HMI | Hermarchos , with inscrip- 

tion. He was a disciple of 
Epicurus. 

901 (5469). Small Bust of 
Demosthenes, superior to M . 
893 (Fig. 58). 

902 (5465). Small Bust of 
Epicurus with inscription. 

903 (5292). Statuette of a 
Satyr with a thyrsus. 

Beneath the window : 
904. Candelabra, decora- 
ted with many reliefs. 

On the walls of the room: 

905-908. Paintings of the 
Second Style from Boscorea- 
le, with very beautiful archi- 
tecture. The meaning of the 
pictures has not yet been de- 
termined. 

Room of the Isis. 

Together with the Grae- 
co-Roman gods the Egyptian 
divinities found many wor- 
shippers. In Pompeii directly after the earthquake of 63 A. D. the temple 
of Isis was rebuilt. The objects here collected were excavated there. 

Over the door, outside : 

909 (3765). Inscription stating that the temple was rebuilt at the 
expense of Numerius Popidius Celsinus, who was rewarded by being, 
received amongst the Decuriones. The parents, freed citizens, strove by 
this act of generosity to secure a higher position for their son. 

910. Holy-water stoup. 

In the centre of the room : 

911 (6290). Head of a Woman. Roman copy of a fifth century type. 

912 (6868). Another holy -water stoup. 
Along the window wall : 

913, 914. Marble column, bronze stands for braziers. 




Fig. 54. Dionysoplaton. 



The Bronzes 



In the glass case: 

915-923. Candelabra, lamps, sistra, sacrificial knives, etc. 

924 (1035). Tablet with hieroglyphs, which had not the least connection 
with Pompeii, but were placed in the Shrine of Isis in order to give local 
colour. 




Fig- 55- Wrestling yoi 
925. Leaden Vessel in which water was kept. 

926 (6298). Statuette of Venus Anadyomene, with traces of colouring. 
On the wall opposite the window : 

927 (6312) Marble statuette of Diony- 
sus giving his panther water from a can- 
tharus. Dionysus was associated with Osi- 
ris as was Venus with Isis. 

928 (976). Statuette of Isis. Archaistic, 
painted and gilded. She held the sistrum 
in her right hand and in her left the 
Ankh. 

929 (4991). Herm of Norbanus Sorex. 

Among the frescoes from the Temple 
of Isis the following are noteworthy: 
Over the entrance door : 

930. Osiris. 

931. Caricature of Typhon. 

932. An Egyptian woman is stan- 
ding on a ship and drawing another ship 
along behind her. Beneath are two great 
snakes. 

933 (8564). Lion advancing to the right. 

934 (8562). Ibis. 

On the wall opposite the window : 
935, 936 (8565, 8533). Animals. 




Fig. 56. Scipio 
in a Pompeian picture. 



Ground-floor 



937 (9548). lo guarded by Argos. Hermes gives him a syrinx in order 
to lull him to sleep so that he may kill him and so liberate lo. 

938 (9558). lo is carried back to Isis in Egypt by the Nile. 

Room of the Pompeian Temples. 

Everything that was found in the three temples of Zeus, of Apollo, 
and of Zeus Meilichios has been collected here. 

Near the door leading to 
the Room of Isis : 

939 (6266). Large marble 
bust of Zeus, resembling the 
Zeus of Otricoli, which is a 
fourth century creation. 

At the base : 

940 (6694). Marble Relief. 
Zeus holding the sceptre in 
his right hand, is seated on 
a throne borne by winged 
animals. 

941 (6260). Torso of a co- 
lossal seated statue. Zeus? 

942 (6264). Urge Bust of 
Hera. 

In the centre of the win- 
dow wall : 

943 (22573). Terracotta 
Bust of Minerva with helmet. 

Along the third wall: 

944 (22574). Terracotta 
Statue of Jupiter. The right 
hand held the thunder bolts. 

945 (22575). Terracotta 
Statue of Juno. 




Fig. 57. Sappho (Phot. Brogi). 



946 (5629). Bronze Statue of Apollo shooting an arrow from his bow. 
Opposite : 

947 (4895). Upper portion of a bronze statue of Artemis. She is in the 
act of shooting arrows, probably at the Niobids. 

Fourth wall : 

948 (6294). Marble Statue of Venus, much restored. 

949 (6352). Statue of a Hermaphrodite. Companion figure to N. 948 
and made of marble. 

950 (187). Herm of Mercury, the patron of the palaestra. 

Room of the large bronze fragments. 

951. Numerous fragments of equestrian and other statues, many with 
traces of gilding. 

In the centre of the. room: 

963 (110127). Silver bust of Galba. Very much damaged. 



The Marbles 



73 



Corridor of the Antinous. 

964 (6052). Bust of Tiberius, who strongly resembled his mother. 

965 (6400). Colossal seated statue, restored as Augustus. 

966 (6043). Herm of Tiberius. 

967 (6046). Statue of Caligula, in a cuirass. Very much restored. The 
older portions are of good workmanship. 

968 (6060). Bust of Claudius. Good execution. The mental weakness 
and the timidity of the man are clearly recognisable. 

969 (6059). Statue of Titus in 

a cuirass, represented as the con- ,- 
queror of Jerusalem. 

970 (6058). Bust of Nero (?) 
Likeness is lacking but it is dif- 
ficult to see whom else the bust $ Kfe . 
resembles. 

971 (6055). Statue of the youn- 
ger Drusus, so called because of 
the resemblance to his image on 
coins. The type is derived from 
a Polyclitan work. 

972 (6054). Female Bust. 

973 (109516). Head of the 
younger Drusus. 

974 (6192). Female Bust, with 
traces of red colour still remai- 
ning in the locks of hair that co- 
ver the temples and ears. 

975 (111386). Bust of a youth. 

976 (6063). Bust of a Roman, 

certainly not a portrait of Nerva. 

Opposite the door leading to 
the garden : 

977 (6029). Statue of a Wo- 
man, seated. The head assuredly 
does not belong to the body. The 

hands are restored. The drapery and such portions of the body as are 
visible are very caretully executed. This portrait of a woman of about 
fifty years of age has been thought to be one of the two Agrippinas, but 
the identification is doubtful. 

978 (120424). Head of a Woman of the Claudian period. The hair is 
arranged in curls and shows traces of red colouring. 

979 (6033). Bust of Caracal la. He had accustomed himself to turn his 
head towards his left shoulder in imitation of a habit of Alexander the 
Great, noticeable in all portraits of that monarch. The artist has here 
made a portrait admirably full of the character of the fiend who did not 
hesitate to kill his brother in their mother's arms (Fig. 59). 

980 (6075). Bust of Hadrian in a cuirass. This is the best portrait of 
that emperor in the National Museum. 




Fig. 58. Bust of Demosthenes 



74 



Ground-floor 



981 (6092). Statue of Marcus Aurelius in a cuirass. 

982 (6031). Bust of Antoninus Pius. Excellent workmanship. 

983 (6030). Statue of Antinous, the favourite of the Emperor Hadrian, 
who gave up his life for his master, and who was deified after death and 
worshipped ordinarily under the guise of Dionysus. The motive of the 
statue is derived from a fourth century original (Fig. 60). 

Along the long wall : 

984 (6081). Statue of L. Verus, in a cuirass. The right arm is restored; 
the head is ancient but does not belong to the body. 

985 (6079). Bust of 
M. Aurelius. He wears 
a chlamys. 

986 (6056). Colossal 
seated statue of an Em- 
peror. The head and 
arms are restorations. 
The restorer had Clau- 
dius in his mind. 

987 (6070). Bust of 
a Man. Period of the 
Anton ines. 

Opposite the Cor- 
ridor of Homer: 

988 (6057). Statue 
of a Roman Empress 

arrayed as the Muse 
Polyhymnia. The desi- 
gnation of Antonia is 
incorrect. She resem- 
bles Matidia, the mo- 
ther of Sabina. 

Along the right 
wall : 




!. Bust of 

Fig. 59 Caracalla (Phot. Brogi). Caracalla, cp. N. 979. 

990 (6074). Bust of 

the so called Plotina. This designation is arbitrary. The hair is piled up 
in curls forming a diadem above the forehead. 

991 (6080). Bust of the elder Faustina, recognisable by the style of 
hair-dressing. 

992 (6062). Bust of a Woman of the Flavian period, judging by the 
coiffure which was then fashionable. 

'993 (6195). Bust of a Woman, identifiable by coins as Marciana, the 
sister of Trajan. 

Hall of the Great Mosaic. 

994 (6038). Julius Caesar. Colossal Bust, which must be identified as 
a portrait of C. Julius Caesar on the basis of agreement with coins. Good 
workmanship of the first century B. C. (Fig. 61). 



The Marbles 



75 



On the left wall : 

995 (6048). Head of a Man. Only the face is antique. Perhaps intended 
to be Marcellus. 

Opposite : 

996 (6045). Bust, considered to be the elder Agrippina, or perhaps 
Livia. 

To the left : 

997 (6044). Statue of Marcellus. The left hand and the right arm are 
restorations. Part of the hair near the left temple was removed so that 
a wreath might be placed on the head. This statue, and the one following, 
were found at Pompeii in the 

Macellum. 

Opposite: 

998 (6041). Statue of Li- 
via, the wife of Augustus. 
The right forearm is resto- 
red. She holds an incense 
burner in her left hand and 
wears an olive wreath, the 
ends of which hang down 
on her shoulders. Although 
the features are not quite 
the same as those of the well- 
known portrait of Livia, yet 
the identification is confirmed 
not only by the fact that the 
statue was found with that 
of Marcellus (cp. N. 997) but 
also by the inscription that 
was found with it. We pro- 
bably have before us an ideal 
portrait of the empress as a 
priestess, the artist having 
paid little regard to the crea- 
tion of a faithful likeness. 

999 (10020). The battle of 
Alexander. In size and signi- 
ficance this is the most im- 
portant of all mosaics. Cur- 
tius (1 1 1-27) has described the 

meeting of Alexander, King of Macedon, with Darius, King of the Persians. 
The former has pressed forward and with his lance transfixes a com- 
panion of Darius who has interposed his own body and that of his falling 
horse in order to save his king. At this sight Darius almost forgets his 
own danger. His 'charioteer despairingly urges his horses to flight over 
all obstacles in order that he may bring the chariot out of the turmoil 
and thus save Darius, but the king stretches out his arms to the friend 
who has laid down his life for him (Fig. 62*. The mosaic probably goes 
back to a motive created in the Hellenistic period. 

1000 (6049). Statue of a Man. The head and arms are recent additions, 
and the statue has been restored as Tiberius. 

1001 (6050). Head of a Boy, supposed by some people to be Nero. 

1002 (6362). Statue of Fortuna, found in the Temple of Fortuna at 




Fig. 60. Antinous (Phot. Brogi). 



Ground-floor 



Pompeii. She holds a cornucopia in her left hand. The statue is of me- 
diocre execution and belongs to the Alexandrian period. The head, how- 
ever, is of an earlier type and may have replaced that of an empress. 

1003 (6190). Bust of the younger Agrippina, with the hair dressed in 
a peculiar fashion. This identification is proved by coins. 

1004 (6053). Statue of a Man, holding a cornucopia in his left hand. 
It is doubtful whether the head be antique. Some people suppose it to be 
Tiberius or Augustus. 

Hall of the Flavians. 

In the centre : 

1005 (6066). Bust of Vespa- 
sian. Good workmanship. 

At the end of the hall : 

1006 (6064). Statue of a Youth 
clad in a toga. The head is an- 
tique, but does not belong to this 
body. The arms and feet have 
been restored. The identification 
with Britannicus lacks proof. 

1007 (6068). Colossal bust of 
Vespasian. The upper portion of 
the head has been restored and 
the forehead has thus been made 
too high. Otherwise the execu- 
tion is good. 

1008 (6229). Statue of a Boy, 
wearing the toga praetexta and 
a bulla. 

1009. Colossal Head of Vespa- 
sian. Mediocre work. 

1010 (6061). Bust of Domitian. 
Good execution. 

1011 (6039). Statue of an Em- 
peror, restored as Julius Caesar. The head and the right arm are modern. 

1012 (6230). Statue of a Boy, wearing the toga praetexta and a bulla. 
The identification with Nero is arbitrary. 

Hall of Tiberius. 

1014 (6193). Bust of Livia, found in a shrine of the Lares at Gragnano 
Comparison with the cameo in Florence results in the identification as 
Livia in actual portrait resemblance and not idealised, as was usually 
the case. She is here presented to us in her youth. The execution of the 
bust is good. 

Near the window wall : 

1015 (6000). Colossal statue Of Tiberius. A large portion of the head 
is new. The artist intended to represent the emperor as Mars after a type 
derived partly from Lysippus, partly from still earlier times. There is 
something forced about his work. 

1016 (118092). Colossal Bust of Titus. Mediocre work. 




The Marbles Mosaic of the battle of Alexander 



77 



1017 (6051). Colossal Bust of Tiberius. The head is one of the best we 
know of Tiberius, and portrays him at an advanced age. 

Opposite the Bust 
of Livia, towards the 
window : 

1018 (6718). Slab 
Of a Relief. Cupids 
and bulls on either 
side of a candelabra. 

1019, 1020. Archi- 
tectural Frieze with 
Cupids, Victories and 
animals amidst acan- 
thus leaves. 

1021-1024 (6585, 
6607). Other architec- 
tural fragments with 
decoration in relief. 



Hall Of 
Antoninus Pius. 

1025 (6072). Statue 
of Trajan in a cui- 
rass. Portions of the 
arms and legs , and 
the upper part of the 
head, if not the en- 
tire head, are resto- 
rations. Consequent- 
ly the identification 
with Trajan is uncer- 
tain. The reliefs on 
the cuirass are very 
fine. 

1026 (6032). Bust 
of Matidia , the mo- 
ther of Sabina who 
was the wife of Ha- 
drian. The identifi- 
cation is verified by 
her portrait on coins. 
This bust ranks a- 
mong the best por- 
traits of women con- 
tained in the Naples 
Museum. 

1027 (6076). Bust 
of Plotina, the wife 
of Trajan. Numerous 
portraits of her have 
been preserved. 

1028 (6095). Statue 




Ground-floor 



of Lucius Verus. The right arm has been restored. The head has been 
suspected , but it certainly does belong to the statue. The attitude is re- 
miniscent of the Apollo Belvedere. 

In the centre of the room : 

1029 (6078). Colossal Bust of Antoninus Pius, a beautiful and splendid 
work of art. The head was probably found in the Baths of Caracalla 
(Fig. 63). 

1030 (6299). Statue of a Roman woman as Venus. The attitude is 
that of the Capitoline Venus. The face, however is a portrait, though 
there are no means of ascertaining whose portrait it is. 

1031 (6291). Statue of Ve- 
nus, possibly with attempt to 
reproduce some one's por- 
trait. There is a slight resem- 
blance to Faustina. 

Along the walls : 

1032 (6093). Bust df the 
youthful Marcus Aurelius. 

1033 (6102). Statue, sup- 
posed to be Maximinus. Ar- 
bitrarily put together and has 
no connection with Maximi- 
nus. 

1034 (6082). Bust of a 
Boy, evidently a member of 
the imperial family. Closer 
identification is impossible. 

1035 (6090). Bust of the 
youthful Marcus Aurelius. I- 
dealised. 

1036 (6077). Statue of an 
Emperor, to whom the resto- 
rer has given the features ol 
Domitian. 

1037 (6094). Bust of the 
youthful Marcus Aurelius. 

1038 (6067). Bust of Ha- 
drian in cuirass and chlamys. Good execution. Gorgons and Victories 
serve to ornament the cuirass (Fig. 64). 

1039 (6069). Bust of Hadrian in a chlamys. Good workmanship. 

1040 (6071). Bust of Antoninus Pius. 

1041 (6091). Bust of the youthful Marcus Aurelius. 

1042 (6314). Colossal Statue of Antlnous as Bacchus. It has been much 
restored and it is possible that the attributes are incorrect additions. 
Cp. N. 983. 

1043 (6084). Bust of Commodus in cuirass and chlamys. Probably 
modern. 

1044 (6096). Bust, supposed to be Lucius Verus; the execution is not 
bad, but the designation is incorrect. 

1045-1049 (6763, 6753, 6757, 6739, 6788). Decorative Statues from the 




Fig. 63. Antoninus Pius. 



The Marbles 



79 



Temple of Neptune in Rome. This splendid building which is still standing 
in the Piazza di Pietra, was rebuilt and decorated by Hadrian and his 
successors. Beneath each column there was on the stylobate a correspon- 
ding pier ornamented with a figure in national costume personifying a 
conquered province. Beneath each intercolumniation was a slab with 
trophies of arms. Most of the fragments discovered in excavation are 
still in Rome, either in the Palace of the Conservators or in the Ode- 
sc ilchi and Altieri Palaces. Naples possesses the figure of an Asiatic 
province, possibly Bithynia, in the dress of an Amazon, and a young 
fi-j ire whose long hair is confined by a fillet, perhaps intended to be 
Nuricutn. A third, Armenia, has her hair parted in the centre and is 
holding an arrow and a quiver. There are also two slabs with trophies 
of arms. 

On the wall behind 
the bust of Antoninus 
1'ius: 

1050 (6678). Relief 
with inscription. Two 
men clad in togas are 
sacrificing before a sta- 
tue , which according 
to> the inscription , is 
that of Marcus Aure- 
lius. 

Above : 

1051, 1052 (6729, 
6603). Two medallions 
with a bust on each of 
them. 

On the wall oppo- 
site the windows : 

1053 (6603). Relief 
from a sarcophagus. 
Period of the Antoni- 
nes. 

Above : 

1054. Medallion 
with a bust. 




Fig. 64. Bust of Hadrian. 



Hall of the Roman Busts. 

(As almost all the names given to the busts are doubtful, it is not 
worth while to enumerate them here and for the sake of brevity we 
confine ourselves to those that have been identified with some certainty). 

At the left end of the marble table opposite the windows. 

1060(6086). Septimius Severus, whose beard is peculiary arranged in 
long curls. 

Near it, to the right : 

1061. So-called Clodius Albinus. The style of the hair and beard show 
that this bust belongs to the period from Hadrian to Septimius Severus. 
De Petra considers it to be Clodius Albinus. 

1069 (6106). Colossal Bust of a Barbarian, probably a Dacian. 



So 



Ground-floor 



1070 (6178). Brutus. This is considered to be a portrait of L. Brutus, 
the liberator of the Roman people, because the head is similar to the 
head of L. Brutus which M. Brutus put on his coins. This assumption 
presupposes that a portrait of L. Brutus was handed down as late as the 
first century. In any case a bronze bust in the Palace of the Conserva- 
tori represents the same person. 

Portico of the Antinous. 

To the left: 

1074 (6182). Bust of an unknown 
Roman. 

1075 (6179). Bust of an unknown 
personage, of negro type. 

In the case: 

1076 (111399). Small Bust of De- 
mosthenes. 

1077 (110872). Epicurus (?). 

1078 (111389). The so-called Se- 
neca. This bust was probably joined 
to another as a double herm. 

1079 (110873). The same. 

1080 (111392). Small Bust of Epi- 
curus, cut away behind. Cp. N. 1078. 

1081 (109611). Roman bust from 
Pompeii. It is fastened by means of 
cement to an Aretine vase. 

1082 (119585). Bust of Metrodorus. 
Opposite the window: 

1083. Bearded Head of a Greek. 
It has been placed on a plaster herm. 

Along the left wall : 

1084 (6025). Head of a Roman, 
considered by some to be Marcus Bru- 
tus, by others as a portrait of Virgil. 

1085 (6028). Bust of Pompey. O- 
thers hold it to be Horace. 

1086 (6697). Relief. An old man 
in a cloak is seated on a chair, and 
is about to carry a cup to his lips. 

1087 (6141). Bust of a Greek general. Lysimachus has been suggested. 

1088 (6142). Bust of Posidonius, the Stoic, identifiable by the in- 
scription. 

1089 (6128). Bust of Zeno, the Stoic, with an inscription. 

1090 (6127). Bust of a Man. It has been identified as Eratus or as 
the Stoic Chrysippus. 

1091-1093 (6185-6187). Bust of a Man, incorrectly called Seneca. 

1094 (1037). Head of Perseus, the last king of Macedonia. 

1095 (6231). Statue of a Roman in a toga. By a misapprehension this 
figure has been designated as M. Tullius Cicero. 




Fig. 65. Statue of an orator (?). 



The Marbles 



1096 (6125). Statue of a Woman, resembling Livia, but also like Dru- 
siila. The designation of Sibylla which was formerly accepted is untenable. 

1097 - 1098 (6201, 6189). Two Busts of unknown Romans. 

1099 (6181). Bust of Marcus Brutus. The identification is questionable. 

1100 (6205). Bust of a Roman. 

1101 (6180). Bust of an Orator. The designation of Caius Marius has 
no foundation. 

1102 (6204). Bust of a Roman. 
1103. Statue of a Man. It is derived 

from the Hermes of Andros. 

1104 (6245). Head of a Roman. With 
it was found an inscription bearing the 
name Terentius, which suggested the wri- 
ter of comedies , but he had nothing to 
do with this statue, 

1105 (6202). Bust of a Roman of the 

last century of the republican period. It 
is impossible to identify it. 

1106 (6700). Relief. A man in a cloak 
is seated on a stool , gazing at a mask 
that stands before him. 

1107 (111385). Bust of Pompey. Cp. 
N. 1085. 

1108 (6194). Bust of a Woman, with 
veiled head. The himation is thrown 
round the neck , so that only the face 
remains uncovered by the garment. This 
attitude frequently recurs , especially in 
Greek terra-cotta figures of the fourth 
century. 

Corridor of Homer. 

Left wall : 

1109 ;6139). So-called Herm of Sopho- 
cles. It is now more correctly named 
Aeschylus. The hair and beard are trea- 
ted in masterly fashion. Fl *- 66 ' 

1110, 1111 (6132, 6136). Lycurgus. The designation is arbitrary. 
1112 (6143). Herm of Solon (?). Excellent execution. The designation 
is arbitrary. 

In the middle: 

1113. Headless Statue, of good workmanship. It probably represented 
an orator. (Fig. 65). 
Right wall: 

1114 (6163). Male Bust. Designation undetermined. 

1115 (,6131). Supposed Bust of Carneades. Coarse work. 

1116 (6130). Bust of Lysias, identifiable by the inscription. The bust 
was probably part of a statue which represented the orator addressing 
an audience. 

6 




82 



Ground-floor 



1117 (6159). Herm of Antisthenes, the founder of the School of Cynics. 
The identification of this statue is unquestionable, because of its resem- 
blance to the Antisthenes of the Vatican. It is probably a production of 
the beginning of the fourth century. 

1118 (6415). Herm of Socrates. The superficial resemblance of this 
great philosopher to Silenus is emphasised. An inscription on the herm 
is a quotation from the Criton of Plato. (Fig. 66). 

Opposite : 

1119 (6413). Herm of Sophocles. Inasmuch as two copies of this type 
bear inscriptions dating from antiquity designating them as Sophocles, 
there can be no question as to the correctness of this name. The bust 
dates from the time before the Hellenistic period and is perhaps influenced 
by the statue erected by the poet's son Jophon. The Lateran Sophocles 
is several decades younger. 

Farther along the left 
wall : 

1120 (6133). Bust of So- 
phocles (?). Perhaps it is in- 
tended to represent Aeschy- 
lus or Aristophanes. 

1121 (6140). Bust of He 
siod (?). It used to be taken 
for Homer. The designations 
as Hesiod , or as Apollonius 
of Tyana, who worked mira- 
cles in the first century after 
Christ, are both uncertain. 

1122 (6135). Bust of Eu- 
ripides. The inscription pro- 
ves the identification. Among 
the other portraits this one 
is distinguished by fine exe- 
cution. It is problably deri- 
ved from a bronze original 
placed in the theatre in A- 
thens by Lycurgus , the o- 
rator. 

Opposite, on the right 
wall : 

1123, 1124 (6160, 6161). 
Two Busts Of Euripides, one 
cf good, the other of medio- 
cre, execution. 

1125 (6134). Bust of Sophocles (?). Similar to the one in the Lateran. 

1126 (6129). Bust of Socrates. Too much emphasis is laid on those 
traits of Socrates which remind the superficial observer of Silenus. 

Farther along the left wall : 

1127 (6114). Herm of Euripides. 
Opposite : 

1128. Herm of Hesiod (?). 

1129 (6239). Double Herm Of Herodotus and Thucydides: both histo- 




Fig. 67. Homer (Phot. Brogi). 



The Marbles 



rians can be identified by the inscription of their names. They are the 
work of an artist of the second Attic School but are dependent upon an 
earlier model. The double herm was found in the middle of the sixteenth 
century and was sawn asunder by order of the Farnese. In Naples the 
two halves have been once more united. 

Opposite the door leading to the garden : 

1130 (6023). Bust of Homer. This is a magnificent work of art. . By 
means of the legendary blindness of Homer the artist has brought into 
prominent expression the divine enthusiasm and clairvoyance of the poet. 
The work must have been produced in the Hellenistic period (Fig. 67). 

1131 (6237). Statuette of a Man, seated upon a throne supported by 
winged lions. 

1132 (6238). Statuette of 
a seated Man identifiable by 
the inscription as Moschion, 
but as the head is missing , 
it is impossible to know 
which Moschion is meant. 

On the right wall : 

1133 (6146). Bust of He- 
rodotus, with inscription. 

1134 (6157). Bust of a 
helmeted warrior. Closer i- 
dentification is impossible. 

1135 (6236). Double Herm. 
Identification impossible. 

Farther along the left 
side : 

1136 (6162).So-called Bust 
of Anacreon. 

Opposite: 

1137 (6144). Supp. Bust of 
Periander. Probably found in 
Herculaneum although mar- 
ked Farnese. There is a simi- 
lar bust in the Capitoline 
Museum which has been na- 
med Julian the Apostate be- 
cause of its manifest resemblance to that emperor. But this identification 
is incorrect for the busts bear indications of earlier Greek origin. 

Farther to the left : 

1138 (6154). Bust, supposed to be a portrait of Juba, the elder. 

1139 (6018). Statue of Aeschines. Found at Herculaneum broken into 
many fragments. The artist has represented the rival of Demosthenes in 
an attitude he was very fond of assuming, namely hiding his arms under 
his cloak when speaking instead of having them free. The sculptor seems 
to have been interested in portraying the orator rather than the politi- 
cian. One might desire more life in the statue (Fig. 68). 

1140 (6155). Bust of a Man, designated Socrates, but without reason. 

1141 (6147). Bust of a Man, supposed to be Lysias. 

6* 




Fig. 68. Aeschines (Vatican). 



Ground-floor 



1142 (6153). Bust of a Man, incorrectly called Demosthenes. 

1143 (6152). Bust of a Man, identified as Zeno, but without reason. 
Careful workmanship. 

1144 (6150). Bust of Pyrrhus. The helmet is decorated with a crown 
of oak -leaves. The diadem, of which the ribbon is visible on the neck, 
signifies that its wearer is a king. These attributes seem to indicate that 
this is Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, the adversary of Rome. (Fig. 69). 

Opposite : 

1145 (6105). Statue of a Youth in the attitude of prayer. 

Farther to the left: 

1146 (6149). Herm of De- 
metrius Poliarcetes (?). The 
appellation is not quite cer- 
tain, because his features as 
given on coins, differ slightly 
from these. The bull's horns 
indicate a deity and are al- 
ways given to Seleucus Ni- 
cator, but also appear in por- 
traits of other princes who 
were his contemporaries. 

1147 (6126). Statue, re- 
stored as Homer. The head 
and neck, judging by their 
smoothness and different co- 
lour, are evidently restora- 
tions. In all probability the 
statue represented a poet, and 
for this reason the restorer 
transformed it into a Homer 
when adding a new head. 

1148 (6156). Herm of Ar- 
chldamos , King of Sparta. 
The damaged inscription on 
the herm had been interpre- 
ted as Archimedes, but this 
identification is contradicted 
by the cuirass and sword- 
belt (Fig. 70). A new reading of the inscription gives us the name as 
Archidamos thus assuming that the herm is a portrait of Archidamos 
the Second , who was King of Sparta at the beginning of the Pelopon- 
nesian War. 

1149 (6188). Herm of a Woman. It stood in Herculaneum together 
with a herm of Pallas. This is not a portrait, probably we must recognise 
Hestia (Fig. 71). 

In the centre : 

1150 (6210). Statue of an Orator. Found at Herculaneum broken in 
many fragments and subsequently much patched. The yellow colour is 
caused by heat. Judging by the costume, it is a Greek, and the identifi- 
cation as Valerius Publicola is consequently incorrect. 

Along the right wall : 

1151 (6148). Herm, supposed to be Attilius Regulus. This appellation 




Fig. 69. Pyrrhus (Phot. Brogi). 



The Marbles Inscriptions 



is quite arbitrary, it is more likely Philetairos, the founder of the Per- 
garaene dynasty, but even that is not certain. Mediocre work. 

1152 (6158). Bust, supposed to be Ptolemaeus Soter. The diadem is 
the attribute of a prince ; all else is uncertain. 

1153 (6151). Herm of a Man wearing a helmet. 



Rooms of the Inscriptions. 

1156-1255. In the centre of the Corridor of Greek Portraits and behind 
the Bust of Homer, there is a door leading to five rooms in which the 

Inscriptions have been arran- 
ged, the smaller ones in cases 
and the larger oftes upon the 
walls. They come from exca- 
vations and from the following 
collections, namely the Farne- 
se , the Borgia , the Daniele 
(Capua), and the Seminary of 
S. Francesco in Pozzuoli. The 
Collection of Inscriptions in the 
National Museum is of great 
importance in the study of La- 
tin and Greek Epigraphy, and 
of Italic dialects. This subject 
is more fully treated in the ori- 
ginal Italian edition. See pre- 
fatory note. 



Court yard 

(Opposite the entrance of the 
Rooms of the Inscriptions). 

1257. Numerous Statuettes 
have been placed in the court- 
yard. They served to ornament 
fountains and most of them are 
not of great artistic merit. 




Fig. 70. Archidamos II. 



On the Central Staircase. 

1258 (8266). Upper portion of a Colossal Statue of Zeus. The god was 
represented seated, probably with the left arm raised and holding the 
sceptre, while the right was stretched out. The magnificent conception 
revealed in this statue is derived from a work of art produced in the fifth 
century. It is probably a Roman copy of a Greek statue. Found in 1758 
at Cumae, it was finally after many wanderings transferred to the Naples 
Museum. 



86 



Mezzanino 



Campanian Wall Paintings. 

The wall-paintings found in Herculaneum, Pompeii, and Stabiae en- 
able us to form some idea, though necessarily a dim one, of the painting 
of the Greeks. It must not be forgotten that the pictures before us served 
merely as decorations and are executed with a completely different techni- 
que from that employed in the paintings of Greek artists. Nevertheless 
they afford a conception of Greek art quite other than that derived from 
Greek vase paintings. Most of the pictures were executed from the time 
of Augustus down to the reign of Titus, many indeed having been pro- 
duced after the earthquake of 63. A. D. The motives are probably bor- 
rowed in great measure from the Greeks, but there are also traces of 
Roman influence. 

Mezzanino. 

First Corridor. 

Over the entrance door: 

1259 (9553). The amours 
of Zeus. The god is depicted 
in a reclining attitude hold- 
ing sceptre and thunderbolts 
while Eros diverts his atten- 
tion. 

On the wall to the left: 

1260 (111436). Jason be- 
fore Peleus. Peleus , accom- 
panied by one of his daugh- 
ters, is descending the steps 
of a temple. Below, at an al- 
tar to the right stands Jason, 
wearing only one shoe. To 
the left a bull is lead to sa- 
crifice. Peleus, who had dis- 
possessed Jason's father of his 
dominions, had been warned 
by an oracle to beware of a 
man wearing only one shoe, 
and this prophecy recurs to 

Mg. 71. Herm oi a woman. him on beholding Jason. To 

remove the danger he sends 
Jason forth on the perilous quest of the Golden Fleece. 

1261 (111471). Phqlnix, the hoary old tutor of Achilles, has arrived 
with Diomede at Scyfos to implore Deidamia to send Neoptolemus to 
fight against Troy. The meaning of this hitherto inexplicable picture has 
been made clear owing to the recent discovery in Pompeii of a copy on 
which the name of Phoinix is inscribed. 

To the left near the passage to the Second Corridor : 

1262 (120632). Philoctetes wounded. He advances painfully, leaning on 
a long staff. Under his left arm he holds his bow and quiver with the 
fatal arrows of Hercules. It is with these that he gains a subsistence. 

1263 (119691). The Judgment of Paris. To the right is seated Paris in 




Campanian Wall Paintings 87 

a thoughtful attitude, near him stands Hermes, pointing with his right 
hand to the three goddesses, who have come to Paris in order that he 
may settle their dispute as to which of them is the most beautiful. 

1264. Nude Aphrodite arising from the sea. 

In the passage leading to the second Corridor. 

To the' left above : 

1265 (9089). Aeneas and Anchises, a caricature in which the persons 
concerned are represented as monkeys. The well-known scene where 
Aeneas, leading his son Ascanius by the hand, is bearing his father An- 
chises on his shoulders away from Troy. 

Below : 

1266. Perseus showing Andromeda the reflection of the Gorgon, to 
gaze on whom directly meant death. 

Opposite : 

1267 (115397). Hercules and Aujfe. While washing the raiment of the 
goddess, Auge, a priestess of Athena is assaulted by the drunken Her- 
cules. She bore him a son, Telephus. 

To the right near the passage : 

1268 (9009). Aeneas wounded. He leans upon his spear and rests his 
left hand on the shoulder of his little son Ascanius who weeps bitterly. A 
doctor examines the wound. Aphrodite approaches with the healing herb. 

1269 (9010). The wooden hflrse of Troy. Into their city the Trojans 
are drawing the wooden horse in which the Greek warriors are concealed. 
Under a tree sits a mourning woman, probably Cassandra. Another, 
perhaps Helen, is depicted above, signalling to the Greeks with a lighted 
torch. 

Near it, to the right, on the wall with semicircular window : 
1270. The same. 

At the right end of the same wall : 

1271 (120033). Judgment of Paris. Cp. N. 1263. 

First Room. 

To the left of the entrance : 

1272 (9008;. Hercules and Telephus. The son of Auge (Cp. N. 1267) is 
suckled by a hind. Hercules looks on in company with some women com- 
monly supposed to be local deities. 

Left wall (*) : 

1273 (8999). Cassandra prophesying. On the right stands the prophetess 
crowned with laurel and bearing a branch in her hand. Opposite sits Priam 
with little Paris leaning against his knees. Beside him stands Hector hold- 
ing a sword. In the background are other Trojans. Cassandra is evidently 
warning Priam and Hector of the approaching downfall of Troy to be 
caused by Paris. 

1274 (9110). Achilles in Scyros. In order to save her son from certain 



(*) The left wall is that to the left of the spectator when he stands 
facing the window. 



88 Mezzanine* 

death, Thetis has dressed Achilles in female clothing and hidden him 
amongst the daughters of Lycomedes, but by the cunning of Ulysses he 
is discovered. To protect his playmates he seizes weapons and thus reveals 
his identity. 

1275 (119689). Ulysses and Circe. Ulysses (the head is damaged) springs 
from his seat and prepares to draw his sword against Circe who with out- 
stretched hands implores his mercy. One of his transformed companions 
looks in through an upper window. 




Fig. 72. The Sacrifice of Iphigenia (Phot. Brogi). 



1276 (9104). Fight between Achilles and Agamemnon. The latter having 
threatened to carry off Briseis is challenged to a fight. Both draw their 
swords but are each held back, Achilles by Athena. Only the portion 
representing this last incident is still intact. 

1277 (9105). The Surrender of Briseis. In the centre is seated Achilles 
who proudly but calmly orders the surrender of Briseis to Agamemnon's 
two messengers. Patroclus leads the maiden towards them. The tent of 
Achilles is seen to the right in the back ground. 

1278 (9112). The Sacrifice Of Iphigenia. To appease the wrath of 
Artemis who by contrary winds prevents the setting forth of his fleet, 



Campanian Wall Paintings 



Agamemnon has to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia. Two leaders of the 
Greeks hold her, prepared for the death-blow which the priest Calchas 
hesitates to inflict. The father Agamemnon stands with veiled head near 
a column with a statue of Artemis. Suddenly the goddess herself appears 
in the sky and has a stag brought by a nymph to take the maiden's 
place on the altar. This story was the subject of a celebrated picture by 
Timanthes (Fig. 72). 

1279 (9109). Achilles and Cheiron. The centaur teaches Achilles to 
play the lyre. 

1280 (119690). The Departure of Chryseis. To soften the heart of Apollo 
who has sent a plague upon the Greeks to punish them for chasing away 
his priest Chryses, Agamemnon decides to restore Chryseis to her father. 
A ship is drawn down to the water and the maiden embarks. 




Fig. 73. Marriage of Zeus (Palermo). 



1281 (9559). Marriage of Zeus. Hera in bridal attire approaches Zeus 
who is seated upon a rock. Below the rock are seated three youths per- 
sonifying the meeting-place. A precisely similar representation of the 
scene recurs on one of the Metopes from Selinus (Fig. 73). 

1282 (9107). Ulysses and Penelope. Ulysses, having ridded his house 
of the suitors, is not yet recognised by his wife who watches him atten- 
tively as he sits on a broken column. The nurse, Euryclea, and other 
hand maidens are present. 

1283 (9108). Departure of Chryseis. Cp. N. 1280. The right side of the 



90 Mezzanino 

picture is missing. A slave is assisting the maiden to climb on to the deck 
of the ship. 

1284 (116085). Achilles in Scyros. Cp. N. 1274. When Achilles has 
betrayed himself by seizing weapons, Ulysses and Diomede put forth 
their right arms to hold the youth and win him over to fight against 
Troy. The King Lycomedes may be seen in the background. His daughters 
fly in every direction. 

Window wall : 

1285 (114322). Phaedra seated in a chair converses with her nurse 
who holds a wax tablet and a stylus in her hand. Phaedra has evidently 
handed her the letter in which she reveals to Hippolytus, her step son, 
her love for him. 

1286 (9249). Ares and Aphrodite. The goddess wearing a diadem atid 
a purple cloak is seated in an armchair. Ares stands behind her and lays 
one hand upon her bosom. A maiden is busy taking jewels from a casket 
on the left while Eros stands watching them on the right. 

1287 (111440). Medea holding a sword in her left hand. She turns with 
the intention of slaying her children. 

1288 (114321). Medea, sword in hand, gazing at her children who are 
playing knucklebones. She has resolved to slay them in order to revenge 
herself on Jason. Through a window the tutor looks into the room. 

1289 (9257). Punishment of Eros. Aphrodite, angered by some misdeed 
committed by Eros deprived him of his quiver and had him put in chains. 
She points him out as a warning to a brother Eros. The culprit , tied 
and bound, weeps bitterly. In his hand he holds a mattock wherewith 
to till the ground. 

1290 (109751). The Theft of the Palladium. In order to capture Troy 
the Greeks have to obtain possession of the Palladium. This is undertaken 
by Ulysses and Diomede with the help of Helen and of her handmaiden 
Aethra (the names are inscribed in each case) in spite of the desperate 
struggle of the Priestess who tries to prevent the theft. 

Right wall : 

1291 (114320). Helen and Paris. Eros acts as go-between, drawing 
Helen's attention to Paris who is seated. 

1292 (111210). The Death of Laocoon and his sons. Laocoon, who had 
warned the Trojans of the wooden horse, was strangled with his sons, by 
two serpents, while making sacrifice. The painter here shows Laocoon 
who sought refuge on the steps of the altar with one serpent entwined 
round his body. He seizes it by the neck and tries to hold it off. One of 
his sons is dead already. The second serpent is in the act of killing the 
other son. The sacrificial bull is escaping to the right. Trojans are de- 
picted gazing fearfully at the horror. 

1293 (111476). Cassandra prophesying. Cp. N. 1273. 

1294 (111474). Hercules and Nessus. Hercules seizes and slays the 
Centaur who had assaulted his wife Deianira while bearing her across 
the river Euenos. 

1295 (9001). Hercules and Nessus. The Centaur offers to carry Deia- 
nira across the river on his back. Hercules hesitates. 

1296 (111475). Europa on the Bull. The daughter of Agenor is seated 
on the Bull (Zeus had thus transformed himself) while her companions 
are stroking the apparently gentle beast. 

1297 (9042). Punishment of Dirce. Cp. N. 1260. Zethos and Amphion 



Catnpanien Wall Paintings 



are busy attending to the bull to which Dirce is tied. Antiope and the 
shepherds who brought up the two youths are standing by. 

1298 (111473). Musical Competition between Pan and the Nymphs. 
Pan holds the syrinx while one of the nymphs plays the lyre. Others 
form an audience around them. 

1299 (8980). Meleager and Atalanta. Between them lies the wild boar's 
hide offered by him to her in honour of her first wounding the animal. 
Two youths, partakers in the chase, stand in the background and show 
fear of the impending tragedy. 




Fig. 74. The Knucklebone Players (Phot. Brogi). 

On the end wall : 

1300 (9049). Theseus after the slaying of the Minotaur. The Athenian 
youths and maidens delivered by the hero surround him and endeavour 
in every possible way to show their gratitude. 

In the revolving show-case are a few examples of painting on marble: 

1301 (9560). Fight against a Centaur. The Centaur has seized a maiden 
who defends herself with energy against the agressor. A youth hurries 
forward, seizes the creature's head, plants one knee against his neck and 
swings his weapon for a death blow. 

1302 (9562). The Knucklebone Players. Three women, Niobe, Phoibe 
and Leto are standing while two others Hileaira and Aglaie are seated 



92 Mezzanine 



on the ground playing with knucklebones ( Fig. 74 ). The artist signs 
himself Alexandros of Athens. 

1303 (9564). The Apobates. This name was given to men who leapt 
from their horses or chariots and on or in again at full gallop. A youth 
is here depicted alighting in full armour from his car while the charioteer 
drives on. Like N. 1302 this picture is derived from a fifth century 
original. 

1304 (109370). Niobe. She stands in front of a Doric temple tending 
one of her daughters wounded by Artemis. Her glance is directed upwards 
towards the goddess. Beside her is the nurse attending to another daughter. 

1305 (9561). Silenus wearied has sunk down upon a stone. A woman 
is busy offering him refreshment. Another woman attends to his ass. 

1306 (9563). Scene from a tragedy. Three actors with masks are re- 
presented. Whether or not the scene is from Hippolytus must remain 
questionable. 

Room II. 
To the left: 

1307 (112282). Ares and Aphrodite seated side by side with a dog at 
their feet. To the right in the corner lies a youth apparently asleep while 
over him stands another youth watching the god and goddess. 

1308 (112283). Sleeping Bacchante. A Bacchante with thyrsus and 
tympanum lies on the bank of a stream. From the left approaches a man 
(this figure is much damaged) who is assumed to be Dionysus, while Si- 
lenus is visible behind a rock. 

1309 (111472). Historical Scene. A King in barbaric costume sits in 
front of his tent conversing with some men who stand before him. It has 
been suggested that the picture represents Croesus and Cyrus or Cyrus 
before Astyages. 

On the right wall : 

1310 (120034). Aphrodite (?). A woman with a swan at her side lays 
her hand upon the shoulder of another woman. From the left comes a 
maiden carrying flowers and fruit. 

Passage into Room III: 

1311 (9171). Eros extracting a thorn from his foot. The same subject 
as that treated in the well-known statue in the Palace of the Conserva- 
tor! in Rome. 

1312 (111439). Iphigenia in Taurls. Orestes and Pylades who have 
journeyed to Tauris in order to steal the statue of Artemis are caught 
and condemned to death. Iphigenia comes out of the temple bearing the 
statue. There are only traces left of Orestes and Pylades. Perhaps this 
may be a copy of the painting by Timomachos. 

1313 (9538). The same. To the left are Orestes and Pylades bound to 
a pillar. To the right stands Iphigenia gazing fixedly at the victims. 
Maidens prepare the sacrifice. 

1314 (9111). The same. To the right sits Thoas measuring with his 
eye the two youths. Iphigenia descends from the temple in the background. 

i:J15 (!i5itt>). Marsyas and Apollo. The god, crowned with ivy, holding 
a cithara and plectrum, is seated on the left. Olympos on his knees before 
him is interceding for Marsyas who is tied to a tree behind them. 

1316 (8976). Medea about to slay her children. She stands sword in 



Campanien Wall Paintings 



93 



hand uncertain whether to wreak her vengeance on Jason or to give way 
to her maternal affection (Fig. 75). This is probably a copy of the picture 
by Timomachos. 

On the left wall: 

1317 (9285). Triumph of the youthful Bacchus. Satyrs and Bacchantes 
moving towards the right. Amongst them may be seen old Silenus with 
the youthful Bacchus in his lap. The painting is much damaged. 

Above the entrance : 

1318 (9535). Apollo and Daphne. The god 

has caught the maiden who fled from him. 
The laurel tree on the right symbolises her 
transformation. 

1319 (8992). Hercules and Omphale. Her- 
cules prompted to thoughts of love by an fi- 
res , holds a staff adorned with ribbons in 
his left hand. On his right stands Omphale 
with his club. 

On the left wall : 

1320 (111441). Dido and Aeneas. In the 

foreground Eros leans upon the queen who 
is arrayed like Artemis. To her left stands 
Aeneas in barbaric costume , equipped as a 
hunter. 

1321 (9265). Bacchic Scene. Satyrs and 
Bacchantes. 

1322 (9286). Bacchus and Ariadne in Na- 

xos. Ariadne asleep watched over by Hyp- 
nos. Bacchus with his train approach from 
the left. 

1323 (9267). Bacchic Scene. Priapus or the 
youthful Bacchus stands in conversation with 
some women. 

1324 (111437). A nest of Cupids. A youth 
and a maiden watch with interest a nest of 
baby cupids. 

In the centre of the room : 

1325 (109608). Statue of Aphrodite. The 
goddess leans upon a small idol of the Spes 
type. The original goes back to the fourth 
century. In this copy the polychrome treat- 
ment is noteworthy. 

Second Corridor. 



On the wall opposite the window , to 
the left : 




Fig. 75. Medea. 
(Phot. Brogi). 

1326 (120085). Combat with an Amazon. 

A warrior has seized a retreating Amazon by the hair and seeks to pull 
her off her horse. Possibly Hercules and Hippolyta. 

1327 (115399). Belleroplion standing in front of Pegasus receives an 
important document from the hands of Proetus whose queen Stheneboea 
stands behind him. 



94 Mezzanino 

1328 (120086). Absolution by a youthful priestess of a young warrior 
guilty of some deed of bloodshed. 

In the passage to the third Corridor : 

1329 (111209). Domestic Scene. A husband and wife are reclining on 
a couch before which a table is spread with food. From the left a boy 
approaches probably bringing articles of adornment. 

To the left, beneath the window : 

1330. Aditietus and Alcestis are seated together. They are confounded 
by the oracle that has just been read aloud and by which they learn that 
Admetus is doomed unless some one is willing to die in his stead. As 
the parents decline to give up their lives for their son, Alcestis offers to 
die for her husband. 

1381 (9261). Dionysus and Pan. 

Near it, to the right : 

1332 (9274). Dionysus with his troupe. 

1333. Harpocrates in his usual costume advances, finger on lip, towards 
the right where a serpent is about to consume gifts lying on the altar. 

Near it, to the right : 

1334 (9452). Hermes with the caduceus in his left hand and a bag of 
money in his right. 

Third Corridor. 

Above the entrance : 

1335 (8905). Genius familiaris and Lares. In the centre stands the 
Genius familiaris, holding a cornucopia and a patera. A pig has been 
brought as a sacrifice. On either side stand Lares with drinking-horns 
and buckets. 

To the right : 

1336 (112285). Representation of the Lares. On the right stands For- 
tuna : two snakes are seen rapidly nearing a man who is in the act of 
committing a nuisance ; above is the inscription : cacator cave malum. 
Such pictures were employed to prevent the committing of nuisance. 

Below : 

1337. Athena and Marsyas. Athena had invented the flutes, but, on 
becoming aware that playing on them distorted her countenance, she 
threw them away and Marsyas picked them up in order to use them 
himself. Both scenes are here represented. 

On the wall opposite the window : 

1338 (8886). Polyphemus and Galatea. The uncouth Polyphemus, whose 
story is sung in the Odyssey, loved the sea-nymph Galatea. He bewails 
the sorrows of his love while Galatea, forever unapproachable by him, 
glides through the waves on the back of a dolphin. 

1339 (9508). Paris on Mount Ida. He is feeding his flock in the pre- 
sence of the Genius of Mount Ida. 

1340 (9506). Daedalus and Icarus. To escape from Crete where he 
was kept prisoner by Minos, Daedalus made wings for himself and for 
his son. But Icarus flew too high, the rays of the sun melted the waxen 



Campanien Wall Paintings 



95 



fastenings of his wings and he fell headlong. The body was found by 
Daedalus who stretches out his arms to his son. 

1341 (8843). Victorious Warrior near a trophy. 
Above the entrance to Room III : 

1342 (112286). Vesuvius. Dionysus stands near a high mountain. He 
is completely enveloped in a purple grape-vine and is giving water to his 
panther. Below a snake is crawling towards an altar. The mountain is 
considered to be Vesuvius before the eruption, that is to say the present 
Monte Somma. 

1343 (113197). The Judgment of Solomon. Three judges are seated 
upon a tribunal surrounded by soldiers. A child lies upon a block and a 
soldier is about to cut it in half with a hatchet. The child's mother has 
flung herself on the ground before the judges and implores their mercy. 
The scene is caricatured (Fig. 76). 

1344 (112222). Fight between the people of Pompeii and those of Nu- 
ceria. The Pompeian Amphitheatre was frequented by inhabitants from 
the surrounding towns, and within its walls the natives of Pompeii and 
the visitors from Nuceria once came to blows. This event is here depicted. 




Fig. 76. The Judgment of Solomon (Phot. Brogi). 



To the left, near the entrance to the fourth corridor : 

1345 (9555). The arrival of lo in Egypt. Cp. N. 938. lo was borne by 
the Nile to Egypt where she was received by Isis and her worshippers. 

1346 (8924). Worship of Isis. A ceremonial rite is being performed by 
priests in front of a temple. The band of worshippers is drawn up in two 
rows to take part in the holy sacrifice. 

To the right of the entrance : 

1347 (8919). The same, slightly altered. 
Beneath the window : 

1348 (9251). Ares and Aphrodite. Cupids are playing with the weapons 
of the enamoured god. Cp. N. 1286. 

1349 (111479). The Niobids. A landscape with temple, on either side 
of which are Niobids mounted on horses and engaged in hunting when 
they are suddenly fallen upon by Apollo and Artemis, who had vowed 
vengeance on Niobe for her contemptuous treatment of their mother. 

1350 (9647). Ganymede's attention is drawn by Eros to the eagle, 
flying down to carry the youth away to Olympus. 



g6 Mezzanine 

1351 (8882). Hylas, sent by Hercules to fetch water, is seized by three 
nymphs who endeavour to carry him off. Two local deities are seated on 
the right. 

To the left of the entrance to the second corridor : 

1352 (8836). This painting is a votive offering and represents Isis- 
Fortuna, with cornucopia and sistrum, and other divinities who are asso- 
ciated with her. It was the gift of Philocalus, votum solvit libens merito. 

1353. Daedalus and Icarus. Icarus lies dead on the shore. Above flies 
Daedalus sadly seeking his son. 

Third Room. 
To the left, above : 

1354. Hercules and Omphale. The figure of Omphale is lost and all 
that remains to us is the lower portion of the picture with Hercules in 
a reclining attitude, while two Cupids are busied with his club. 

1355 (9027). Admetus and Alcestis. Cp. N. 1335. 

1356 (8996). Perseus and Andromeda. Cp. N. 1266. 

1357 (9247). To the left is seated Endymion in hunting attire. Selene, 
recognisable by the crescent she wears on her head, descends to him. 

1358 (8993). Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea-monster whose 
prey she had become, as punishment for the boastfulness of her mother. 

1359 (9000). Hercules and Omphale. Omphale gazes down upon the 
hero, who lies drunk upon the ground, while Cupids play with his weapons. 

1360 (8977). Medea on the point of slaying her children. Sword in 
hand she watches them at play with knucklebones. 

1361 (8997). Perseus rescuing Andromeda. Cp. N. 1358. 

1362 (9248). Ares and Aphrodite. Cp. 1370, 1348. 

1363 (8995). Perseus showing Andromeda the Head of Medusa. Cp. 
N. 1266. 

1364 (8998). Perseus rescuing Andromeda. Cp. N. 1358 (Fig. 77). 

1365 (9240). Endymion and Selene. Cp. N. 1357. 

1366 (9106). A seated woman is giving drink to an aged man. Sub- 
ject undetermined. 

1367 (9041). Phaedra and Hippolytus. Phaedra is seated on the left, 
near her stands the nurse ; the youth is about to go forth hunting. 

1368 (9528). Thetis visiting Hephaestus. In order to replace the wea- 
pons lost by the death of Patroclus, Thetis goes to Hephaestus and begs 
him to provide new ones for her son Achilles. These the god forges in 
proof of his gratitude to Thetis and he now shows them to her. 

1369 (9531). The Forge of Hephaestus, where he and his Cyclopes 
are at work. 

1370 (9529). Thetis visits Hephaestus. Cp. N. 1368. 
To the right, near the window: 

1371 (9388). Narcissus, unresponsive to the love of a nymph is cursed 
by her and condemned to die of unrequited love. On seeing his own ima- 
ge reflected in water, he becomes enamoured of it and perishes by reason 
of unsatisfied desire. 

1372 (111477). Medea and the daughters of Pelias. To punish Pelias 



Campanien Wall Paintings 



for the wrong: he had done to Jason, Medea persuaded the daughters of 
Pelias to kill their father. She induced them to do this , having first 
proved to them on the body of a ram that she had the power of resto- 
ring the dead to life. 

1373 (9385). Narcissus at the fountain. Cp. N. 937. 

1374 (9557). lo and Argus, who is about to take the syrinx from the 
hands of Hermes. Cp. N. 937. 




(Phot. Brogi). 



Fig. 77. Perseus re 

1375 (9231). The Graces with flowers and fruits. The grouping is con- 
ventional. 

1376 (9211"). Cupids are busying themselves with the Bull of Europa. 

1377 (9236). The Three Graces. Cp. N. 1375- 
In the passage leading to Room IV: 

1378 (1626). Serpent, winding itself round a candelabra. 

7 



98 Mezzanine 

1379 (9250). Ares and Aphrodite seated together. Cp. N. 1348. 

1380 (9593). The meaning of this picture is undetermined. Possibly 
Paris and Helen. 

1381 (9449). Dionysus with other divinities. No explanation can be 
given for the association of Dionysus with Helios and Aphrodite. 

1382' (9256). Ares and Aphrodite. Cp. N. 1379. 

1383 (9043). Theseus, having slain the Minotaur and rescued the 
children, receives their gratitude for his heroic deed. 

1384 (9556). lo and Argus. Cp. N. 937. 

1385 (9044). Pirithous and Hippodamia. The Centaurs present them- 
selves among the guests at the marriage of Pirithous and endeavour to 
secure a welcome by offering gifts. 

1386 (8898). Dido forsaken. She is seated on her throne bewailing the 
departure of Aeneas who sails away on his ship. ' 

1387 (9380). Narcissus at the fountain. Cp. N. 1371. 

1388 (9026). Admetus and Alcestis. Cp. N. 1330. 

1389 (9012). Hercules and the serpents. Hera sent two serpents to kill 
the infant Hercules in his cradle. But, even before the horrified parents 
could rush to the rescue, the child crushed tre reptiles to death with 
his strong little hands. 

Room IV. 

To the left, above : 

1390 (9276). Sacrificial Scene. A girl brings an offering to Dionysus. 

1391 (8845). Sacrificial Scene. Silenus lays an offering before the sta- 
tue of Cybele. 

1392 (9530). Apollo and a Woman. At the left is seated a woman, 
perhaps Cassandra or Manto, while before her stands Apollo with his 
bow and quiver. 

1393 (8846). Gods of Healing. Apollo, Aesculapius and Chiron stand 
in a group. 

1394 (9154). Marsyas playing the flute. 

1395 (9141). Marsyas playing the flute in the presence of Olympos. 
To the left, near the window: 

1396 (115398). Micon and Pero. Micon was condemned to death by 
starvation, but his life was saved by his daughter Pero who gave him 
milk from her own breast. 

1397 (9040). The same. 
To the right : 

1398 (111211). Polyphemus and Aeneas. Aeneas and his companions 
land to see Polyphemus, upon whose gigantic frame Aeneas gazes in 
astonishment. 

1899 (9537). Helios with a Woman. 

1400 (8968). Sophonisbe and Scipio. The Romans demand that So- 
phonisbe, their implacable enemy, shall be slain. Scipio endeavours to 
achieve this and goes to Masinissa. 

Below : . 

1401. The Origin of Rome. Representations of various myths con- 



Campanien Wall Paintings 99 

nected with the founding of Rome, such as the meeting of Mars and 
Rhea Silvia, the exposure of Romulus and Remus etc. 

Above the entrance to the fifth room : 

1402 (9241). Endymion and Selene. The goddess of the moon de- 
scends to Endymion. 

In the passage to Room V.: 

1403 (9180). Sale Of Cupids. An elderly woman carries a basket full 
of little Cupids which she is selling to young girls. 

Farther along on the right wall : 

1404 (111213). Hermaphrodite and Silenus. 

1405 (9271). Ariadne and Dionysus in NaxOs. Cp. N. 1322. 

1406 (111214). Ares and Aphrodite. Cp. N. 1379. 

1407 (9124). Wrestling match between Pan and Eros, with Silenus 
acting as umpire. 

1408 (111480). The meaning of this picture is undetermined. A woman, 
seated on a throne is giving a command to a hero through the mediation 
of another person. 

1409 (9262). Wrestling Match between Pan and Eros. Cp. N. 1407. 

1410 (9278). Ariadne and Bacchus in Naxos. Cp. N. 1322. 

1411 (9320). Hymen. A youth with a torch and wreath is leaning 
against a pillar. 

1412 (9264). Hermaphrodite. A Paniscus approaches a Hermaphrodite. 

1413 (111481). Dionysus with a Hermaphrodite. 

1414 (9050). Bacchic Scene. 

1415 (9270). Bacchic Scene. 

On the wall opposite the window : 

1416 (8983). Polyphemus and Galatea. Polyphemus is seated on a 
rock and opposite him is Galatea with a fan in her hand. 

1417 (8984). Polyphemus receiving Galatea's letter. An Eros riding 
on a dolphin is the bearer of a letter to the Cyclop from his beloved. 

1418 (9384). Narcissus. Cp. N. 1371. 

1419 (8864). Hylas overpowered by nymphs. Cp. N. 1351. 

1420 (9383). Narcissus. Cp. N. 1371. 

1421 (9552). Danae and Perseus. Acrisius, dreading the fulfilment of 
an oracle, set his daughter Danae and her son Perseus adrift on the sea 
in a chest, but they were borne by the waves to the island of Seriphus 
where Dictys and other fishermen drew the chest ashore and rescued the 
mother and child. This incident is depicted. 

1422 (9382). Narcissus. Cp. N. 1371- 

1423 (111212). Danae and Perseus. Cp. N. 1421. 
Above the entrance : 

1424 (111483). Pyramus and Thisbe. Thisbe, terrified by a lion, re- 
turns to the trysting-place and there finds the body of Pyramus who 
had killed himself, as he believed Thisbe to be dead. She seizes the 
dagger and thrusts it into her own breast. 



loo Mezzanine 

1425 (8896). Phrixus and Helle. Phrixus stretches out his hand to 
save his sister Helle who has fallen into the sea. 

1426 (8889). The same. 

1427 (9534). Apollo and Daphne. The god endeavours to win the maid- 
en's heart by his music. 

1428 (111442). Poseidon and Amphitrite , seated on the back of a 
young Triton. 

1429 (9536). Apollo and Daphne. Cp. N. 1318. 

1430 (9386). Narcissus. Cp. N. 1371. 

1431 (9246). Endymion and Selene. Cp. N. 1402. 

1432 (9532). Apollo and Daphne. Cp. N. 1318. 

On the left wall : 

1433 (9048). Theseus receiving the skein of thread from Ariadne. 
Ariadne loved him and gave him the thread so that he might be able 
to retrace his steps and escape safely from the labyrinth. 

1434 (111484). Bacchus and Ariadne in Naxos. Cp. 1322. 

1435 (8979). Daedalus and Pasiphae. At the command of Pasiphae, 
wife of king Minos, Daedalus makes the image of a cow for her. The 
queen comes to look at his work. 

1436 (27695). Leda and the swan. 

1437 (9381). Narcissus gazing at his own image. Cp. N. 1371. 

1438 (9052). Theseus forsakes Ariadne and is about to embark. 

1439 (9051). Ariadne awakes and sees in the distance the ship on 
which Theseus has sailed away. 

1440 (115396). Theseus forsakes Ariadne. Cp. N. 1438. 

1441 (9047). Ariadne forsaken by Theseus. Cp. N. 1436. 

1442 (9046). The same. 

1443 (9550). Leda with the swan. Cp. N. 1436. 

1444 (9549). Danae and Eros with the shower of gold. 
Above the entrance to Room III : 

1445 (9269). Bacchus and Silenus. 

In the centre of the room : 

1446 (6292). Statue of Venus. The goddes is leaning on a pillar. The 
type of the statue is derived from Praxiteles. It is especially interesting 
because of the well preserved polychromy. 

Room V. 
To the left: 

1447 (9133). Male and Female Centaurs. 

1448 (9295). Bacchantes. 

1449 (9297). Bacchantes. 
To the left of the window: 

1450 (9218). Eros as a hunter. 

1451 (9195). Eros and Psyche. 

1452 (9206). Eros with several Psyches. 



Campanien Wall Paintings 



1453 (9193). Cupids with Psyches. 

1454 (9207). The same. 

Above: 

1455 (9179). Scenes with Cupids busy treading grapes and making 
shoes. 

In the passage to Room VI : 

1456 - 1458 (9121, 9119, 9118). Satyr as tight-rope dancer. 




ahyrus and Chlor 



rogi). 



On the wall opposite the window note: 

1459 (9453). One of the Dioscuri, with spear and horse. 

1460 (8837). Cronus, holding a harp. 

1461 (9551). Zeus crowned by Nike. 

1462 (9455). One of the Dioscuri. 

1463 (9454). Demeter. 



IO2 Mezzanine 

1464 (9202). Zephyrus and Chloris. Zephyrus, guided by two cupids, 
flies down to Chloris, who sleeps, guarded by Hypnos (Fig. 78). 

Above : 

1465 (9542). Apollo rests his lyre on a column, and is striking it with 
the plectrum. 

1466 (9456). Dionysus with his panther. 

1467 (9457). Demeter with wheat ears. 
Left wall, almost in the middle : 

1468 (9020). The meaning of this picture is undetermined. Two 
youths are conversing, one of them being seated. 




F'g- 79- Paquius Froculus and his wife (Phot. Brogi). 

1469 (9036). Actor. Preparation for the performance. 

1470 (9019). Actor, who probably played the role of a King. 

1471 (9022). Toilet scene. A young girl, probably the bride, is being 
arrayed for the wedding. 

1472 (8895). Fragment. A laurel crowned youth and a woman. 

1473 (9021). Musical performance. 

On the revolving stand near the window : 

1474 (9243). Artemis with bow and quiver. 



Campanien Wall Paintings 103 

1475 (8834). Woman with flowers. 

1476 (8978). Medea about to slay her children. 

1477 (9546). Leda with the swan. 

Room VI. 

Left wall: 

1478. Small Landscapes. 

On the wall opposite window, in middle of left half: 

1479 (9058). Portrait of Paquius Proculus and his wife. (Fig. 79). 
To the right in middle of second highest row : 

1480 (110591). Bacchante. 

Third highest row, the first painting to the left : 

1481 (110590). Satyr with a Woman probably Ariadne, whom he is 
showing to Bacchus. 

In the two cases in the centre of the room are various objects of 
different materials, among which note: 

1482. Small head of Aphrodite, gold rings, a vessel for boiling 
liquids etc. 

Central Staircase. 

Near the window to the left : 

1483 (6402). Female Statue, much restored. Evidently intended to 
be a Muse, but the motive is also used for Apollo. The high girdle is 
an indication that the original cannot have been produced earlier than 
the fourth century. 

To the right: 

1484 (6376). Statue of a Woman, probably a Muse. 
At the entrance to the small Bronzes : 

1485 (6305). Statue of Dionysus with long curls. The right arm is 
restored. 

At the entrance of the Picture Gallery : 

1486 (6309). Statue of Dionysus. Only the torso is antique. 



First Floor. 
The Collection of Small Bronzes. 

Everything in the way of household furnishings found at Pompeii, 
from statues of the Lares down to kitchen utensils, has been arranged 
here. All these objects are of incalculable value in the study of the 
private life of the ancient Romans. 



104 ' First Floor 

First room to the left : 

In the glass case near the window : 

1487. Very beautiful equestrian Statuette of a Warrior, supposed 
to be Alexander. We probably have before us a copy of one of the 
statues made by Lysippus in celebration of the victories of Alexander. 
(Fig. 80). 

1488 (4894). Galloping horse. Cp. N. 1487. 

1489 (4999). Amazon about to hurl her spear. Possibly a copy ot 
the celebrated statue by Strongylion. (V. cent. b. Ch.) (Fig. 81). 




Fig. 80. Supposed Alexander (Phot. Brogi). 



On the marble table to the right of the balcony : 

1491 (72991, 72989). Stands for braziers. 

The case at the end wall Is filled chiefly with animals that served 
as water spouts. Among them are, on the upper shelf: 

1492 (4927). Dog, pointing its ears. 
On the middle shelf: 

1493 (4905). Sow. Votive offering. 



Collection of Small Bronzes 



Below : 

1494 (6489). Sacrifice of a pig. 

1495 (4910). Panther. 

1496 (69795). Basin with a lion. 

In case at left wall, note on upper shelf at left: 

1497 (5371). Aeneas with his family. 

1498 (5506). Votive hand. 

1499 (5304). Winged Sphinx. 

1500 (5535). Archaic Statuette of a man. 




Fig. 81. Amazon (Phot. Brogi). 



On middle shelf, from right to left : 

1503, 1504 (5529, 5539). Archaic Male Statuettes, one was used as handle 
for a mirror. 

1505 (5530). Female Statuette, as handle for mirror. 

1506 (5538). Decoration for a piece of furniture, with figures of Satyr 
and Maenad. (Fig. 82). 

1507 (5562). Mirror. A male figure forms the handle. 

1508 (4718). Mirror. Male figure as handle. 



io6 First Floor 

1509-1511 (5558, 5561, 5569). Mirrors with various scenes. 
1512-1517 (5534, 5511, 5547, 5549, 5548, 5550). Antique Statuettes. 
1518 (5332). Harpocrates leaning on a club. 




I 



Fig. 82. Satyr and Maenad. 

1519 (5242). Winged Genius with bunch of grapes. 

1521 (5018). Boy running. 
Below, from left to right : 

1522 (5460). Crescent with the Capitoline deities. 




Fig. 83. Handle. 



1523. Winged Satyr, with bonnet shaped like the head of a swan. 
1524-1526 (5553, 5536). Figures as handles. 

1529 (72981). Large Handle. Ionic art (Fig. 83). 

1530 (110880). Archaic Statuette of a hoplite. 

1531 (4949). Lion as water-spout. 



Collection of Small Bronzes 107 

The case along the right wall contains chiefly statuettes of Lares 
and Penates found in the Lararia at Pompeii. 

Note: 

On the upper shelf towards the left : 

1532 (5180). Drunken Hercules with his club on his shoulder. 

Near the middle of the second shelf: 

1535 (5185). Statuette of Hercules, an imitation of the Farnese Her- 
cules. Cp. N. 280. 

To the extreme left and below : 

Statuettes of Artemis, Athena, Zeus, Hermes and other gods. 

In the corners : 

1541. Nine Candelabra of various sizes and shapes. 

Room II. 

In the centre in a glass case : 

1542 (72995). Very beautiful tripod, evidently intended for ceremonial 
purposes. 

To the left near the window. 

1543 (109699). Large Bronze Bucket adorned with reliefs. 
To the right : 

1544 (111571). Bucket with double handles. 
In the corners : 

1545. Seven Candelabra. 

Opposite the balcony, on the middle shelf of the case to the right: 

1550 (111697). Statuette of Fortuna with cornucopia and patera. 
This statuette was found in a niche together with a bronze lamp which 
probably burned in front of it (Fig. 84). 

1552 (5329). Statuette of Harpocrates holding a horn of plenty in his 
left hand. 

Statuettes of various deities have been placed in the cases along 
the side walls. The following deserve attention : 

On the upper shelf of the case near the left wall : 

1563 (5122). Minerva with the owl. 

1565 (5288). Minerva with patera and spear. 

On the middle shelf: 

1570. Venus unbinding her sandal. 

1572 (113257). Apollo, leaning on a pillar. 

1574 (113259). Mercury with a tortoise. 

1576 (113258). Aesculapius, with a bag of money in his right hand. 
This differs so completely from the usual type that it seems probable that 
a statue of Mercury was transformed into an Aesculapius. 

1577 (110777). Seated Artemis, with pointed crown on her head. 

1578 (5199). Zeus leaning on a spear. 

1580 (5337). Male Figure with helmet. Perhaps the youthful Ares. 



io8 



First Floor 



Below : 

1583 (6024). Artemis shooting. 

1588 (5009). Bacchus giving wine to the panther. 

1590 (5010). Nike, flying down and about to touch the ground. It is a 
fifth century type. The wings were inserted. 

1591 (121462). Statuette of a Suppliant. 

1592 (5313). Isis-Fortuna. 




Fig. 84. Statuette of Fortuna (Phot. Brogi). 

In the case opposite, on the top shelf: 

1594 (5075-5081). Eight double-headed Menus, chiefly Bacchic. 

On the middle shelf: 

1599 (109567). Relief. A woman washing her hair. 

1601 (5488). Goat-herd milking a goat. 



Collection of Small Bronzes 109 

Below : 

1606 (5026). Man resting his foot on a rock, perhaps Demetrius 
Poliorcetes. Lysippean type. 

Room III. 

On marble tables in the centre of the room : 

1609-1611 (73144, 73146, 69494). Various vessels, with handles deco- 
rated with plastic ornaments. 

In the corners on either side of the window : 

1612, 1613. Candelabra and Tripods. 

Right wall, at the left end of the case : 

1614 (68864). Large Vase shaped like a bucket, with repousse work. 

In the next case are various paterae and lamps, the following being 
noteworthy : 

Below, to the right: 

1620 (72292). Silenus with drinking vessel and wine-skin. 

1621-1624 (72255, 72198, 72287, 72253). Lamps, decorated with figures. 

1625 (72206). Candelabra with two saucers for lamps : at the foot of 
it reclines a Satyr with a wine-skin. 

1626-1629 (72254, 72284, 72291, 72199). Lamps and lamp - stands deco- 
rated with figures. 

Against the end wall is a case containing : 

1630-1634. Incense-burners, vase handles, pedestals and supports of 
various vessels, most of them decorated with figures. 

The case against the left wall contains vessels found for the most 
part at Pompeii and Herculaneum. 
The following deserve notice : 
Below : 

1636 (73511). Dish with a relief of Mars and Venus. The shield and 
sword of the god are inlaid with silver. 

On the middle shelf: 

1637 (69501). Vessel, the handles of which are decorated with reliefs, 
,one being Silenus flogging a young Satyr. 

To the right of the case on an antique marble base : 

1647 (68854). Very beautiful Vase on three feet. It has two movable 
handles, which are inlaid with silver and bear an inscription. 

Room IV. 

In the case near the balcony : 

1648 (4993). Lamp stand. A young Satyr carries a lamp, while on 
the column near him is a head which also serves as lamp. 

1649 (4563). Lamp-stand. A boy riding on a panther, and an altar 
with burning sacrifice, stand upon a square base inlaid with silver. 
From the base rises a pilaster on which hang lamps. 



First Floor 

In the corner near the balcony : 

1651, 1652. Chairs (subsellia) with curved legs, partially restored. 

Against the right wall : 

1653 (73145). Amphora with richly decorated handles. 

_t. In the adjoining case are vase handles 

many of which are shaped as figures. The 
following deserve notice : 
In the fourth division : 

1659 (72592). Handle. Atys in repose. 
(Fig. 85). 

In the fifth division : 

1660 (72823). Bronze plate used to deco- 
rate a casket. The relief on it represents the 
meeting of Socrates and Diotima the hetaira. 

In the case against the end wall : 

1661-1666. Handles. 

In the case on the left : 

1667-1671. Dice and astragali of bone, 
theatre tickets, Roman mirrors, bracelets, fi- 
bulae etc., also N. 118192: Female Bust, per- 
sonifying Africa. 

To the right on an antique marble base: 

1672 (73115). Very beautiful Vase, the 
handle of which is supported at the upper 
end by a winged genius, a swan serving to 
attach the handle to the body of the vase. 

Room' V. 

In the centre of the room , on a round 
marble table : 

1673 (73103). Cratera exquisitely chased. 
Under glass near the window : 

1674 (72231). Lamp-stand in the form of 
a tree. From its branches five lamps are su- 
spended by chains. 

Opposite : 

1675 (72191). Lamp-stand in the form of 
Fig. 85. Atys. an Ionic column. 

In the corner to the left of the window. 

1676 (8408). Marble table with artistically decorated feet. 
Upon it : 

1677 (5017). Statuette of a boy running. 
To the right of the window : 

1678 (5008). Statuette of a youthful Bacchus with a thyrsus In his 
right hand. It served as a lamp. 




Collection of Small Bronzes 



Farther to the right : 

1679 (73005). Large Stand for a brazier, found in the Baths at 
Pompeii. It is decorated in front with a cow in allusion to the na,me 
of the donor, M. Nigidius Vaccula. 

In the case against the right wall : 
1680-1689. Candelabra, lamps, lanterns. 
Ditto in the case at the end of the room. 
In the case against the left wall: 

1690-1692. Candelabra, that can be extended at will, lamps, tripods, 
supports for tables. 

Room VI. 

On marble tables and in the glass case 
near the window : 

1693-1697 (5590, 73884, 111048, 72986,72983, 
73018). Various vessels for heating liquids. 
Some of the shapes are artistic. 

Against the right wall, in a small glass- 
case : 





Fig. 86. Syrinx. 



1698-1703 (69784-69789). Waterspouts of various designs, such as a 
Vase, spear-head, serpent, pine-cone, peacock. 

Close by: 

1704. Marble table, supported by a bronze sphinx. 

1705 (73880). Vessel for heating liquids. 

In the case, in the first division : 

1706. Instruments for architects, compasses, plummet etc. 
In the second division : 

1707. Writing Materials, inkstands and stili. 
Third, fourth, fifth divisions: 

1708-1710. Musical Instruments, among them a syrinx with nine 
pipes (Fig. 86), another with seven, flutes, tuba etc. 

In the case at the end wall : 
1711-1714. Scales and Weights. 



H2 First Floor 

In the case at the left wall, first division to left : 

1715 (69904). Toilet articles for use after the bath. These are hung 
on a ring. 

Second division : 

1716 (12549). Apothecary's scales. 
Third, fourth, fifth divisions : 
1717-1719. Surgical instruments. 
Under the cases : 

1721. Small portable stoves etc. 

Room VII. 
In the centre : ' 

1722. Cork model of Pompeii, Scale of i : 100. It was begun in 1861 
and is added to according as the excavations advance. 

Round the walls, above the cases : 

1722 bis. Copies of Pompeian frescoes. 
To the left : 

1723 (73003). Bath. 
In table N. LX1I. 

1724. Locks and keys. 

Close by in an unnumbered table, made of dark wood : 

1725. Bracelets and other ornaments. 
Opposite : 

Table N. XXVIII : 

1727-1732. Household utensils, among them hooks for taking meat out 
of caldrons, or buckets out of wells, fishing-tackle etc. 

Close by : 

1734 (73007). Bath, similar to N. 1723. 
Against the rail enclosing the cork model : 
17a5 (73009). Brazier. 

1737 (121857). Small stove. 
Between the couches : 

1738 (78613). Round Bronze Table on three feet, which are plastically 
decorated. 

1739-1741 (78615, 78616, 78614). Three couches inlaid with silver. 
Along the rail, to the left of the cork model : 

1742. Leaden receptacle for water. 

1743. Bronze Seat. 

1744. Iron grating. 

1745. Portable stoves. 
In table N. LXIV : 

1749. Numerous strainers, the holes being arranged in ornamental 
designs. 



Collection of Small Bronzes 113 

To the right in Table LXVI bis : 

1750-1751. Harness for horses, oxen, donkeys. Also an instrument for 
paring the horn of the hoof, with a representation of a smith shoeing a 
horse. 

Table LXVI : 

1752-1754. Small Bronzes belonging to the Borgia Collection. 

The cases round the walls contain: 

1755-1777. Diverse household utensils from Pompeii, such as ladles, 
vessels of every description, water-taps, measures for liquids etc. Agri- 
cultural implements are exhibited and there are also moulds and utensils 
used by bakers and pastry-cooks. 

Passage from Room III to the Landing. 

Along the wall : 

Three Iron Chests with bronze decoration. Similar ones stood in the 
atria of Pompeian houses. Chest N. 1778 is ornamented with bustsof gods. 

Opposite : 

1783 (72985). Bronze Bisellium, or seat for two people. 

Near it, to the left : 

1781 (72997). Fetters from the gladiatorial barracks in Pompeii. 

1785 (6343). Statuette of a Satyr with flute. The motive is derived from 
the Praxitelean School. 

1786 (6346). Statuette of a Satyr with a little boy holding a duck. 

1787 (6347). Satyr holding fruit in his nebris. 

1788 (6345). Bearded Satyr. Ornament for a fountain. 

1789 (6869). Sphinx as support for a table. Good Roman decorative work. 

Room of the Small Busts. 

To the right, near the window : 

1790 (73152). Folding seat. The sides were inlaid with ivory. 

Right wall : 

1791. Two Bronze Seats, partially restored. 

Near the entrance, to the right : 

1792 (73153). Smaller folding seat. 

In the window : 

1793 (6542). Bust of a young Woman, bearing a strong resemblance to 
the so-called Psyche of Capua (N. 269). 

Along the walls are glass cases containing small busts etc. 

In the middle of the case opposite the Room with Articles of Food: 

1794 (6519). Torso of a Discobolus, small replica of the celebrated 
statue by Myron, who succeeded in freeing Art from the fetters of ar- 
chaism. The bronze original was produced about 450 B. C. The translation 
into marble is successfully accomplished in the copy before us. 



H4 First Floor 

Note the Frescoes, especially such as treat of life in the Forum at 
Pompeii : 

In the corner, to the right of the entrance : 

1796 (9070). Colonnade, adorned with garlands. In front of it are e- 
questrian statues on high bases. 

1797 (9066). School in the Forum. Punishment of an evil-doer. 

1798 (9064). Sale of cloth. The buyer is carefully examining the 
material. 

1799 (8991). Procession of guild of carpenters at the festival of the 
Quinquatrus. 

1800 (9071). Sale of bread. Above is seated the vendor with loaves of 
bread lying in front of him. 

In the centre case: 
1801. Tissue of asbestos. 

Room containing articles of food and paints. 

The articles of food and the paints that came to light in Pompeii are 
exhibited here. The pictures on the walls are either still life, or repre- 
sentations of meals and carouses. There are also theatre scenes. 

On the wall, opposite window, to right, middle of lowest row: 

1802 (9039). Scene from a tragedy. A woman holding a child in swadd- 
ling bands is suggestive of Auge and Telephos. Cp. N. 1267. 

To the left : 

1803 (9037). Scene from a comedy. A slave is jesting with a hetaira. 
In order to avert the evil eye, he makes a gesture that protects him from 
its baleful power. 

To the right : 

1804 (9035). Scene from a comedy. A father surprises his son or his 
slave in the company of a hetaira. 

Above N. 1802 : 

1805 (9034). Resembles the Mosaic by Dioscurides N. 167. 
To the left of the door, in the highest row: 

1806 (9015). Symposium. Four people are engaged in a symposium. 
Music has been provided for their entertainment. 

1807 (9024). Symposium-scene. A man is pouring the contents of a 
drinking-horn into his mouth. Near him is a hetaira to whom a female 
slave is bringing a jewel-casket. 

1808 (9016). Symposium of hetairae. 
Second row : 

1809 (111482). Four Scenes in an inn. Lovers, tipplers, gambling and 
quarrelling, till the host turns them out: itis foras rixsatis, that is to say: 
"Begone with you, quarrel outside . 

Beneath this are three pictures representing the three stages of a 
meal. They originally adorned a triclinium. 

1810 (120030). The Commencement. The guests are reclining at table 
and a boy brings in dishes. Music and singing accompany the meal. 



Collection of Small Bronzes 



"5 



1811 (120031). Continuation. The musicians have gone, but the guests 
are still drinking and the singing has begun. 

1812 (120029). End of the Banquet. The guests are rising but one of 
them cannot stand up without assistance. 

In the centre of the room : 

1813 (9774). Pillar from the large fuller's establishment (fullonica) at 
Pompeii. The white woollen garments are cleansed in a basin where they 
are trodden under foot; another fuller works at them with teasels, a third 
brings a clothes-horse and ves- r 

sel with sulphur for fumigation. 
After these processes , the gar- 
ments are pressed and inspected. 

In the cases along the walls, 
beginning at the door opposite 
the window: 

1814. Bread, paints, shells, 
tissues, leather soles, rope, thread, 
asphalt, sulphur, tar, vegetables, 
figs, dates, nuts, kernels of pine- 
cones, egg-shells, fish bones, lo- 
cust-beans , raisins, garlic, fil- 
berts, almonds, chestnuts, onions, 
pears. 

In two round showcases, cen- 
tre of room : 

1815. Paints. 

In the square case : 

1816. Figs, grapes, grains of 
corn , also oils and grease in 
glasses. 



Top Floor. 




Fig. 87. Pero and Micon. 



A narrow spiral staircase leads 
out from the Room of the small 
Bronzes and gives access to the second floor of the Museum. 



Room of the Majolicas. 

The art of glazing terra-cotta was probably first practised in Egypt, 
but must have been introduced into Italy, for the series of majolicas before 
us show distinct traces of their Italian origin. All the specimens exhibited 
here were found in Pompeii. 

Opposite the entrance : 

1817. Case I. Vessels with griffins, toads, and lions. 



n6 



Top Floor 



1818. Case II. Ram, crocodile, children etc. 

1819. Case III. Vessels in the form of ducks and cocks, Silenus and 
Egyptian gods. 

1820. Case IV. Vessels of every description, lamps. 

1821 (6382). Statuette of the youthful Hercules. The feet and one hand 
are restored. 




Fig. 88. Tazza Farnese, exterior. 

1822. Case V. Lamps. 

1828. Case VI. Group. Pero giving her father Micon the milk of her 
own breast. Cp. N. 1396 (Fig. 87). Drunken Virago. 

At the window : 

1824. Show case with carvings in ivory and bone, used in part to 
ornament wooden caskets. In addition, a Statuette of Marsyas bound to 
the tree, probably transformed into a support after the fashion of Atlas. 
Also, a copy of the Farnese Bull, in high relief. 



Room' of the Majolicas 



1825. Show case of smaller objects in bone. 

1826 (72990). Bronze Labrum inlaid with silver. 

1827. Paintings and Stucco Reliefs. Note N. 9578, an athlete resting. 




Fig. 89. Tazza Farnese, interior. 

Glass Rooms. 

Room I. 

In front of the window on a pillar : 

1828 (124700). Alabaster Vase containing ashes. 

1829. Show case with articles for the toilet and needlework requisites, 
spindles, various kinds of needles, buttons, needlecases, toothpicks, thim- 
bles, mirrors, combs etc. 



ii8 Top Floor* 

1830. Show case containing glasses amongst which are some made in 
double layers. 

1831-1840. Wall cases I-X. Common Roman glass coloured green or 
yellow. Bottles, ointment flasks, bowls etc. 

In the centre of the room : 

1841 (6111). Statuette of a boy playing with a goose, an ornament for 
a fountain. 

Room II. 

In front of the window under a glass shade: 

1842 (13521). The celebrated Vase of blue glass, excelling even the 
Portland Vase, found at Pompeii in a tomb appertaining to the Villa of 
the Mosaic Columns. The shape is first perfected in an opaque white 
glassy substance, a transparent blue glass vase being blown inside the 
first. Subsequently the figures were carved on the white outer layer, parts 
of this being taken away altogether so that the under lying blue became 
visible as a background for the white figures. The whole vase is covered 
with a network of vine tendrils between which are vintage scenes enacted 
by winged genii. To the accompaniment of flutes the grapes are picked 
and trodden. The vase was used as a cinerary urn. 

In front of the statue : 

1843. Show case in which a twohandled goblet of rock crystal is pre- 
eminent (124701). 

In the centre of the room : 

1844 (6365). Statue of a maiden or nymph, seated half draped upon 
a rock, trying to adjust her sandal. Beside her is a pitcher. The subject 
is Hellenistic derived possibly from the so-called Victory unbinding her 
sandal. The style is reminiscent of the Tyche of Antioch by Eutychides 
who belonged to the Lysippean school. 

Against the walls : 

1845-1854. Show cases I-X. Vases etc. of glass and other materials. In 
the last case two rectangular glass tiles (13634 and 13639), in which the 
figures are drawn upon a gold ground, should be observed. 

Behind the statue : 

1855. Show case with magnificent bowls of speckled glass etc. 

Near the entrance to the next room : 

1856 (111383). Statuette of Venus Anadyomene, the hair painted yellow. 

On the walls : 

1857. Stucco reliefs with Centaurs and Bacchantes. 



Rooms of the Precious Metals. 

Gold Room. 

Near the window, under a glass : 

1858 (27611). So-called Tazza Farnese, a sardonyx, grey on a brown 
ground, thickly veined. It is one of the largest known cameos in the 



Room of the Maiolicas 



form of a vessel with a flat bottom and curved lip. On the outside an 
aegis with Medusa head is cut, the rim of the aegis being crumpled in 
many places, and from behind it dart little serpents. The Medusa is of 
the ancient type with snakes under her chin and wings in her hair, 
but the face has the expression of pathos to be found only in later 
work. (Fig. 88). The inside is adorned with a relief of eight figures 
(Fig. 89). The scene is agricultural. The youth in the centre with the 
features of a satyr supports with his right hand a plough and yoke 
and owing to the presence of the couched sphinx below the action is 
supposed to take place in Egypt. To the left is the Nile. The youth in 
front of him is Triptolemus Horus, the inventor of the plough. He 
holds the ploughshare in his left hand and bears the seed in a wallet. 
Above him are the Etesian winds, looked upon as the cause of the 
seed-distributing floods because they were thought to drive back the 
water at the mouth of the river. The woman seated upon the sphinx is 
Euthemia, the goddess of rains and floods. On her right recline the 
Horae, the two seasons of especial importance to Egypt. This cameo 
was produced in the time of Augustus and surely made in Alexandria. 
In the year 1471 Lorenzo dei Medici inherited it from Pope Paul the 
Second and it passed from him into the possession of the Farnese. The 
hole in the centre probably dates from the Middle Ages. 

1859. Show case containing gold rings embellished with precious 
stones, engraved gems, cameos etc. N. 124688 depicts Leda with the 
swan. In two cases the rings still encircle the mummied fingers of the 
original wearers. 




Fig. qo. Necklets. 



In the centre of the room : 

1860 (6278). Statuette of Apollo in the attitude of the Apollo Lykios 
of Praxiteles. The right arm is raised above the head. 

Behind the statue : 

1861. Another show case of rings of various kinds. In some cases 
only the gems are antique, others belong to post-classical times. 

On the walls : 

1862. Wall case I. Earrings, necklaces and a few Byzantine objects 
from the Borgia Collection. N. 25000, a large Gold lamp for two flames, 
found at Pompeii. 

1863. Wall case II. N. 110602, Statuette of Venus Anadyomene with 



I2o Top Floor 

gold bracelets and chain. N. 24893, Diadem with golden pomegranates 
and butterflies. Pendants (bullae) earrings, snake bracelets etc. 

1864. Wall case III. Gold ornaments from the Stevens Collection. 
Those found in Cumae *) bear the number of the tomb in which they 
were discovered, others are from Tarentum. One series is of Etruscan 
workmanship. There is also a gold bar of Byzantine origin used for 
coinage, stamped with four impressions belonging to officials at the Mint. 

1866. Wall case IV. contains principally necklets. A very beautiful 
specimen is N. 24883 with Silenus-masks, acorns, palmettes, and lotus 
flowers (Fig. 90). N. 24852, a gold Bull with an inscription, is considered 
to be a forgery. 

1866, 1867. Wall cases V. and VI. Wreaths, necklets, bracelets, earrings. 

1868. Wall case VII. N. 24655, Gold feather similar to those found 




Fig. 91. Drinking cups with centaures. 

in the Sardinian town Nora, dating back to Phoenician influence. These 
feathers were bound upon the forehead of the deceased. The case also 
contains diadems and wreaths. N. 110834, a little purse of gold thread. 
1869-1871. WaH cases VIII. - X. Bracelets from Herculaneum and 
Pompeii. Necklets and gold tissue from Pompeii etc. 

1872, 1873 (6292, 126248). Statuettes of Venus Anadyomene with re- 
mains of painting. 

On the walls : 

1874. Stucco reliefs, cp. N.<> 1857. 

Silver Room. 

At the window under a glass shade : 

1875 (25289). Bucket with bath scenes in embossed work. 

*) The ornaments from Cumae are soon to be arranged (together with 
other objects found at that place) in a separate room. 



Objects of precious metals 



In the centre of the room to the left : 

1876. Show case 1. Nos. 25380 - 25381. Two cups adorned with 
masks and cupids riding on beasts in embossed work. They resemble 
the Bosco Reale vessels in the Louvre. 75091, octagonal inkstand with 
the days of the week, silver on bronze. 

To the right : 

1877. Show case II. Two drinking cups with false bottoms. They 
are decorated with cupids and centaurs. They make a pair, matching 
exactly and may be considered the most perfect specimens of good taste 
and artistic style. They were found in the Casa dell'argenteria in the 
Strada di Mercurio in Pompeii. 125709 - 125710. Statuettes found in a 
shrine of the Lares at Scafati. 25492-25493: Two disks, meant to be hung 
up, with busts of Apollo and Artemis. 




Fig. 92. Drinkin 



In the centre of the room : 

1878 (6279). Statue of Artemis the huntress. She is pursuing the 
quarry accompanied by her dog. She has just shot off an arrow. Cp. 
N. 239. 

Farther back on the left : 

1879. Show case III. 25300. Goblet with handle adorned with ivy 
and vine tendrils in relief. N. 25301 is a similar goblet, but without a 
handle, embossed with the apotheosis of Homer (Fig. 93). The poet 
holding a scroll is being carried up to the sky by an eagle. On one 
side the Iliad is represented by a woman bearing arms, on the other 
the Odyssey by a woman with an oar. 

To the right : 

1880. Show case IV. Nos. 35378-25379, goblets ornamented with ivy- 
leaves and berries, 109688, miniature skeleton, these were often handed 
round at a feast to remind the guests of their approaching end and to 
accentuate their appreciation of present enjoyment. Cp. Nos. 157 and 163. 



Top Floor 



Around the walls : 

1881. Wall case I. N. 25490, 
Circular Relief, the reverse side 
was used as a mirror. Probably 
a representation of the forsaken 
Dido comforted by Eros and her 
handmaidens, though the prin- 
cipal figure has also been taken 
for Phaedra. Further on are sta- 
tuettes of gods and a goblet orna- 
mented with a battle of Amazons. 

1882-1892. Wall cases II. XII. 

Various vases, some with inscrip- 
tions, mirrors, strainers, spoons 
etc. Also fragments of utensils. 

Armoury. 

1893. Wall paintings from 
graves at Paestum representing 
warriors on horse and foot re- 
turning with booty. This was to 
do honour to the dead who was 
also held to be victor. The pe- 
culiarities of the armour refer to 
the Oscan-Samnite dwellers in 
Campania who were entirely un- 
der Etruscan influence. The or- 
namental headgear of the horses 
is still to be seen in that district. 
The plumed helmets and identi- 
cal cuirasses and belts are depic- 
ted on vases found during exca- 
vations in Campania. 

On the walls are hung : 

1894. Large Tubae, such as 
were used at gladiatorial com- 
bats. Found in Pompeii. 

Opposite the entrance : 

1895. Leg of a Table in the 
form of a Victory with a trophy. 

In the centre under a glass 
shade: 



, Bronze oeno- 
choe. The handle is decorated 
with a quadriga. 

In front of the window : 
1897. Two richly ornamented 
gladiators helmets, from the bar- 
racks of the gladiators at Pom- 
peii. On one (5673) is represented 
the downfall of Troy (Fig. 941, 
on the other (5674) the apotheo- 
sis of Rome. 




Objects of precious metals 




Kig. 94. Gladiators helmets (Phot. JtJrogi). 
By the window, in two small show cases : 

1898. Collection of slings dating from the siege of Asculum in the 
war between Caesar and Pompey and the later siege of Perugia. 

At the door leading ( ' 
into the next room : -rjcscat, 

1899. Show case con- S*3\. M$k 
taining four large grea- . ^Bu 

ves (5644-5648). 

Around the walls : 

1900-1909. Wall cases 
I-X. Weapons ot all kinds. 
Amongst them are espe- 
cially noteworthy (to the 
left, counting from the 
entrance): Case II. 5656, 
Gladiators helmet orna- 
mented with a scene from 
Roman mythology. II. 
5637 and III. 5639: Shoul- 
der-piece of a retiarius 
(galerus). IV. 5686 Girdle 
of which the leather lin- 
ing is still intact. V. 5735, 
Osco-Samnite breastpla- 
te, which must have been 
brought from Campania 
to Ruvo (Fig. 95). VI. 
Head guard and breast 
plate for a horse. VII. 
5744, Helmet of which 
the side-pieces are ador- 
ned with Nereids. VIII. 

5846 Cock, a military pig. 95. Osco-Samnite breastplate, 

emblem. 




Top Floor 



Collection of Papyri (*). 

Papyrus takes a prominent place amongst writing materials from 
the very earliest times. Used first in Egypt, it maintained its superio- 
rity from 3000 B. C. (the assumed date of the Prisse Papyrus now in 
Paris) until 1000 A. D. when it was ousted by the Arabian manufac- 
tory of paper. The papyrus plant (cyperus papyrus) formerly grew 
freely in the marshy districts of Lower hgypt. Today it has quite disap- 
peared there but is sometimes seen on the upper reaches of the Nile. 
The wild cyperus syriacus which grows in Syria and Sicily differs 
slightly from the Egyptian variety. According to Pliny (N. H. 13, 68-81) 

the material was prepared in the 
following way. The triangular stalk 
of the papyrus was cut into equal 
lengths and these sliced lengthways 
into as many fine broad strips as 
po-isible. These were laid horizontally 
alongside of one another and on the 
top was placed a second layer per- 
pendicular to the first. This double 
block was squeezed with the help of 
a certan gummy substance into a 
compact mass and then dried. The 
resulting single leaves could thereupon be stuck together and formed 
into long or short rolls. From the seventh century onwards papyrus as 
a writing material was exported especially to Greece. The manufacto- 
ries that sprang up abroad, particularly in Rome, did not actually pro- 
duce papyri but transformed the raw material imported from Egypt 
into a locally popular form. Between the years 1752 and 1754 a large 
number of rolls of papyrus were found in various parts of a house in 




Fig. 96. Coins of electron. 




Fig. 97. Didrachme. 

Herculaneum, hence called the Villa dei papyri. They were carbonised, 
unfortunately not through the action of fire as at first supposed, but 
through the evaporation of the oxygen which they contained. They 
had to be excavated from the deposit of ashes which had become as 
hard as stone. This as may be imagined was a difficult task and more- 



* This will probably soon be moved into other rooms farther back 
in order to make room for the exhibition of the Stevens Collection in the 
place they now occupy. 



Collection of Papyri 



125 



over, before the nature of the rolls was recognised many were damaged. 
They were first taken for blocks of coal, proved by the name bottega 
del carbonajo (coal-merchant's shop) which was given to the room in 
which they were found. The peculiar nature of the rolls was only 
realised after the accidental recognition of certain letters inscribed on 
them and their subsequent removal was more carefully undertaken. 
There was great joy at the discovery of a library of the first century 
A. D. but of what use were these sealed and blackened rolls if they 
could not be deciphered. One hears a great deal nowadays of new 




Fig. 98. Tetradrachme of Leontini. 

papyri finds and the difficulties of translating them, but these are no- 
thing compared to those with which the translator of the Herculanean 
papyri had to contend. Rolls found in Egypt in the present day have 
preserved their nature and flexibility whereas these referred to are 
merely carbon and may be destroyed by a breath. Several attempts 
have been made to decipher them ; amongst other expedients Paderni 
cut them into strips in order to get at the inner side, but all in vain, this 
procedure resulting indeed in most cases in the complete destruction of 
the rolls. The only successful method of dealing with them is the following 




Fig. 99. Tetradrachme of Syracuse. 

which was adopted by the Jesuit Antonio Piaggio who was sent for 
from Rome to Naples on purpose. His method, which is still practised, 
is as follows. The roll is laid upon and suspended between two wadded 

armc liino-laet; i<j naQtpH nti thf mit*r :iHo niirl tr th* icincrlQcc ar* 



126 



Top Floor 



successfully separated from the mass, it is cut off and pasted on a sheet 
of paper. The roll is thus treated until it has been entirely unwound. 
It is obvious that this treatment results in the loss of the outer layer 
of the papyrus but this is no disadvantage as all the Herculanean 
papyri have been inscribed on the inner layer only. The rescued por- 
tions are read and copied, a most difficult task as the black letters can 
only be distinguished from the black ground because they have left 
marks that shine. To accomplish the work _at all, very goodnight is 




Fig. 100. Decadrachme of Syracuse. 

essential. Another difficulty arises because fragments of the preceding 
or following layer frequently stick (these are the so-called ,, sovrap- 
posti " or ,, sottoposti ") and if not recognised to be extraneous, 
confuse the text. 

In order that the newly discovered rolls should be read and inter- 
preted, King Charles founded the Accademia ercolanese in the year 
I 755> but t ne fi rst volume of the Collection (Herculanensium voluminum 
quae supersunt tomus I.) was not ready for publication until 1793. The 




Fig. 101. Tetradrachme of Gortyne. 

political troubles of succeeding years (it was during this period that 
the Frtnch removed the papyri for safety to Palermo) retarded pro- 
gress and the second volume did not appear until 1809. Unfortunately 
the papyri did not yield the literary treasures that had been hoped for. 
They are mostly the writings of Philodemos ihe Epicurean who never 
achieved distinction so that no great gain has accrued to literature. 
Nevertheless the results are not to be despised. 



Collection of Papyri 



127 



The total number of rolls found is 1810 ; of these 585 have been 
completely and 206 partially unrolled ; in 169 cases the attempt was 
unsuccessful; 25 were given away, 17 from Palermo to the Prince of 
Wales and 6 others were kept by Napoleon as a souvenir of his first 
consulship in the year 1803 ; one was taken by the Commandant of 
Portici and one was sent in 1892 to the Ministry of Education. There 
still remain 825 to be dealt with. Amongst those unrolled the greater 
part are in Greek, only 42 being in Latin and these mostly in bad 
condition perhaps owing to the treatment to which they were subjected 
in Rome on their introduction from Egypt. 




Fig. 102. Tetradrachme of Alexander. 

The titles and authors' names are seldom forthcoming because it is 
very hard to get at the commencement of the rolls and towards the 
end where the name is usually given again, the difficulty of deciphering 
increases. The protruding label on which this information was inscri- 
bed is lost in every case and only in two cases can we positively 
identify the umbilicus or wooden roller round which the papyri were 
wound. 

To the Papyri Collection be- 
long : 

1911 (110568). The wax ta- 
blets discovered on the third and -I 
fifth ot July 1875 in the house ~| 
of the banker Caecilius Jucundus 
(Cp. N. 810, Fig. 46). They deal 
with receipts for auctions and 
accounts of sums of money paid 
over to the owners of sale lots. 
The banker (argentarius) evident- 
ly not only held the auction but frequently advanced the probable re- 
ceipts after subtracting of course the taxes and commission due. These 
accounts were duplicated and one copy of the original was sealed and 
locked away in the presence of witnesses, the other being left exposed 
so that it could be referred to at any moment. The wax on which they 
were written has vanished, the wooden tablets themselves are charred 
but the characters are still legible owing to the fact that the stylus pe- 
netrated the thin layer of wax and made an impression on the under- 
lying wood. 

1912 (116325 - 116328). Wax tablets , somewhat damaged, found 




Fig. 103. Coin of Syracuse. 



128 



Top Floor 



At the door of the Coin Room : 

1913 (6386). Herm of Silenus. 

1914 (6384). Herm of Hercules. 



The Collection of Coins. 

Amongst the ninety thousand specimens, acquired from various 
collections and by recent purchase, now brought together in the National 




Fig. 104. Tetradrachme of Perseus. 

Museum, a selection of one thousand and sixty three coins, arranged 
according to countries and periods, is here shown to illustrate the 
history of coinage from the earliest times down to the present day. 




Fig. 105. Tetradrachme of Myrina. 
Cases I. - V. 

1915. Artistic Development. First Period (600-474 B. C.). As the 
ancient coins are not dated they can only be identified by their shape, 
the metal of which they are made, the stamping, lettering etc. In the 
place of original methods of exchange, came the standard based on the 



Collection of Coins 



129 




Fig. 106. Didrachme of Naples. 



value of cattle. When with increase of trade this standard no longer 
sufficed, metal of all kinds was substituted. Coinage only comes into 
existence when a recognised stamp determines the weight and value 
of a piece of metal. The oldest coins were probably stamped in Lydia. 
These are the pale yellow electron coins (N. 4, Fig. 96), a mixture of 
gold and silver, as the separation of metals was not yet understood In 
Greece the invention of coins is ascribed to the Argive king Pheidon, 
in Rome to Servius Tullius. The oldest coins are stamped on one side 
only and have on the reverse a 
dent (quadratum incusum) owing 
to the fact that they were placed 
upon a projecting support to 
steady them during the process 
of stamping. In the case of a 
few towns in Southern Italy the 
stamp was raised one side and 
incused on the reverse. Of cour- 
se this was only possible with 
very thin pieces of metal (N. 13, 
F'g- 97)- The standard of weight 
for coins is the Babylonian. The 
art of the medallists naturally follows in the footsteps of the greater 
artists. The reproduction of heads such as that of the Apollo on the 
tetradrachmas of Leontini (N. 25, Fig. 98) is still rare. 

Second Period, 474-415 B. C. Here the transition from the archaic 
to the best period of Sculpture exemplified in the work of Myron, 
1'hidias and Polyclitus can be easily recognised. The excellent delinea- 
tion of a goddess on the tetra- 
drachmas of Syracuse ( N. 79, 
Fig- 99). by a number of medal- 
lists is well known and belongs 
jto this period. 

Third Period, 415-350 B. C. 
This is the finest period of coin 
engraving. The artists overcome 
all difficulties and even venture 
to portray heads in front view. 
The coins of Syracuse, especially 
the decadrachmas , surpass all 
the rest in beauty (N. 139, Fig. 100) but other Greek cities share in the 
progress of the art (N. 95, Fig. 101). 

Fourth Period, 350-250 B. C. In the time of Alexander and his suc- 
cessors there arose many types of divine and idealised portrait-heads, all 
showing more or less the influen- 
ce of Lysippus (N. 148, Fig. 102 
and N. 212, Fig. 103). The art of 
Scopas is suggested in the Nike 
of Samothrace on the coins of 
Demetrius Poliorcetes. Together 
with this Greek influence in Sou- 
thern Italy, Roman influence also 
comes into play as is seen in 
the Roman-Campanian issues of 

Fig. 108. Gold Monney of Sylla. 
Fifth Period, 250-50 B. C. 

After maintaining itself at its height for a short time (N. 222, Fig. 

9 




Fig. 107. Didrachme of Metaponto. 




130 



Top Floor 



104 and N. 228, Fig. 105) the art declined rapidly, losing the easy grace 
of the time when the Greek cities were free. 

Cases V. - VI. 

1916. Greek coins from Southern Italy. The coins of separate cities 

are arranged in topographical 
order, beginning with Gales, then 
come Capua, Cumae etc. down 
to Terina. Note the dedrachma 
from Naples with the head of 
the Siren (N. 264, Fig. 106) and 
that from Metapontum with the 
wheatear on the reverse (N. 304, 
Fig. 107). 




Fig. 109. Silver Money of J. Caesar. 



Case VII. 




Fig. no. Gold Money of M. Brutus. 



1917. The Italic Aes grave. The Italic people who were not under 
Greek influence used copper coinage in their exchange with Rome. 
The unit weighing about a pound was the As, which was divided into 
i [2 = semis, i|3 = triens, i|4 quadrans, i|6 sextans, iji2 = uncia. In 
a few cities where the coinage is more artistic the production was pro- 
bably in the hands of Greeks. 



Cases VIII. - X. 

1918. Aes rude and signatum. 

Coins from the city of Rome. 
The name pecunia, from pecus, 
testifies to the original animal 
standard of value. Servius Tul- 
lius is supposed to have been the 
first to have a token stamped 
upon the bronze used as money 
(aes signatum). But even so scales and, for division, a hammer were ne- 
cessary. The proper system of coinage only begins with the aes gra- 
ve = 327 gr. The as was stamped with the double-headed Janus, the 
semis, triens, quadrans, sextans and uncia with the heads of Jupiter, 

Pallas, Hercules, Mercury 
and a helmeted Rome. On 
the reverse of each is the 
forepart of a ship. 

Gradually the weight of 
the As diminished, at the be- 
ginning of the first Punic war 
to i|3, later to i|6, 1(12 and 
even 1(24 of its orignal va- 
lue. At that time silver coins 
were first struck, bearing the 
helmeted image of Rome and 
on the reverse the Dioscuri. 
Soon alter this the officials in charge of the Mint (tresviri monetales) 
altered the issue of silver coinage and stamped it with their own names. 
After the Social war gold coins were issued, exceptionally at first and 
later on in ever increasing quantities. Note N. 476 with Venus and Cu- 
pid (Fig. 108) , N. 486 with Julius Caesar (Fig. 109) and N. 488 with 
Brutus (Fig. no). 




Fig. in. Gold Money of Augustus. 



Collection of Coins 



Cases X. - X11I. 

1919. Imperial Coins. In coins of the time of Augustus it is note- 
worthy that some political incident is usually depicted on the reverse. 
From 15 B. C. the emperor reserved the monopoly of issuing gold and 
silver coin, the copper currency being issued by the Senate. At this 
time coins made of aurichalcum, a mixture of copper, tin and zinc, 
were also in use. In the history of coinage the reign of Nero is impor- 
tant both on account of his revision of the standard of weights and the 
alteration in types. Under his successors the currency was still used 




Fig. 112. As of Drusus, Son of Tiberius. 

as a reminder of political events. The diminishing of weights and the 
debasing of metals continued and of course the minting gradually 
became worse and worse. Note the beautiful gold coin bearing with the head 
of Augustus, on the reverse being Myron's cow (N. 511, Fig. in), the 
as with head of Drusus (N. 540, Fig. 112), the aurichalcum as with 
head of Nero (N. 563, Fig. 113), the gold coin of Pertinax (N. 663, 
Fig. 114) the silver coin of Caracalla (N. 660, Fig. 115), and the gold 
coin of Probus (N. 683, 
Fig. 116). 

At the end of the 
show cases devoted to 
imperial currency are a 
few medals which are 
not properly coins. N. 
706, the gold medal of 
Augustus, found at Pom- 
peii in 1759 is unique 
(N. 706, Fig. 117). On the 
reverse is an archaic fi- 
gure of Artemis (Cp. 106, pig. 113. As in aurichalcum of Neron. 
p. 14). N. 708, the bronze 
medal of the younger Faustina is also a particularly fine coin. 

Cases XIV. - XIX. 

1720. Mediaeval and modern coins. Rare and especially interesting 
specimens from Southern Italy. Note the coin with head of Sergius 
I. Duke of Naples (N. 722 , Fig. 118) , that with Charles I. of 
Anjou (N. 748, Fig. 119) and that with Henry of Lorraine, dating 
from the period of the revolution brought about by Masaniello (N. 843, 

9* 





Fig. 114. Gold Money of Pertinax. 



132 Top Floor 

Fig. 120). Case XVII, contains coins of foreign states and rulers. Case 
XVIII. proof specimens from the different mints. Case XIX is devoted 
to coins of the House of Savoy. 

Cases XX - XXV. 

1921. Medals. Of these there 
are about 7000 specimens. The 
larger works of art of the Re- 
naissance are exhibited in one 
of the rooms of the picture gal- 
lery. Cases XX. - XXI. contain 
medals struck in the various 
countries of Europe. The remain- 
der contain Neapolitan issues 
under the Bourbons and medals 
representing the Kings of Italy 
since 1860. 
In the corners of the room : 

1922 (6287). Statuette of Aphrodite, type of Venus Genetrix. 

1923 (6389). Male Statuette. 

1924 (126249). Statuette of a man, probably a Hellenic ruler repre- 
sented as a Doryphorus. 

1925 (283). Female 
Statuette with well pre- 
served colouring. Very 
probably Charis, the god- 
dess of Grace. A maiden 
dressed in a thin tran- 
sparent chiton, remini- 
scent of the Aphrodite 
of Alcamenes, but of la- 
ter workmanship. Per- 
haps to be ascribed to Fig. 115. Silver Money of Caracalla. 
Timotheus, an Athenian 

sculptor who lived in the fourth century B. C. 
In the same room are exhibited : 




Engraved Stones 



About two thousand are 
shewn in six cases. The 
cameos are divided from 
the actual gems but they 
are not arranged in chro- 
nological order. Many come 
from the collection of Loren- 
zo dei Medici and can be di- 
stinguished by the letters 
LAUR.MED. engraved upon 
them. Many date from the 
sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries. Some of the principal specimens are mentioned below. 

In the centre of the room : 

1926. In the first case, N. 6, Sardonyx with four figures, Daedalus 




Fig. 116. Gold Money of Probus. 



Engraved Stones 



133 



fastening the wings of Icarus. N. 8, Sardonyx, Dionysus leaning upon a 
satyr is standing in a chariot drawn by two Psyches. N. 12, Sardonyx, 
Victory in a Chariot, the work of Sostratos. N. 16, Sardonyx. Battle 
between Zeus and the giants, the work of Athenion ; a remarkably 
beautiful specimen. N. 26, Aphrodite with a nest of Cupids. N. 65. 
Copy of the Farnese Bull unfortunately only partially preserved. 




Fig. 117. Gold Medals of Augustus. 

1927. Of those contained in the third case, mostly Roman, the 
following are noticeable. N. 213, Cornelian, representing the defeat of 
Marsyas. His pupil Olympos seeks to move Apollo through his prayers, 
to cancel the horrid doom of Marsyas, who is to be flayed alive. The 
workmanship is excellent. N. 232. Amethyst. Artemis with a torch, the 
work of Apollonius. N. 254, Cornelian. Achilles admiring the weapons 
newly brought by Thetis, cut by Dioscurides. Both stones are the very 
finest specimens of what can be done in the art of engraving gems. 




Fig. 118. Money of Sergius I., Duke of Naples. 

1928. The case by the window contains mostly gems found in Pom- 
peii. The best is probably N. 27665 representing a sacrifice. A woman 
bringing a basket of flowers to a herm, to the accompaniment of flutes. 

In the Papyri Room are three tables, containing gems, mostly 
modern : 

1929-1931. In the room in which the remaining Coins are kept in 
twelve safes, are one or two Statuettes, decorative work. 



134 



Top Floor 



Near the window, to the right : 

1932 (6401). Female Statuette. The head is antique but does not 
belong to the body. Both forearms are restored. The attributes are 
lacking so there is no means of identifying the original. 

1933 (6259). Female Statuette. Head probably does not belong to the 
body. Hands restored, the right was lowered and probably held a pa- 
tera. The type can be traced back to the fifth century, perhaps a De- 
meter or Kore. 

1934. Nude youth, perhaps 
Hermes, leaning upon an ar- 
chaistic figure. The motive is 
Praxitelean. 

Left wall : 

1935 (6380). Statuette of a 
nude man after the Alexander 
with the spear by Lysippus. 

1936 (6348). Statuette of 
Priapus. Both hands restored. 
The god wears a long flowing 
beard and his head is covered 

with a sort of hood. He leans with his left elbow on a tree trunk. 

1937 (63S1). Seated Athlete. 

1938 (6403). Female Statuette. A woman seated upon a rock, raising 
her right arm. Perhaps intended to be a muse but the absence of attri- 
butes makes her identity doubtful. 




Fig. 119. Money of Charles I. of Anjou. 




Fig. 120. Money of Henri of Lorraine. 
Returning through the Coin Room we come to the 

Collection of Vases 

From the earliest times clay vases have been made as receptacles 
for the preservation of liquids and for other purposes and it is quite 
natural that men should have sought to make them not merely useful 
but ornamental. Owing to the fact that broken fragments of clay could 
not serve any subsequent purpose and therefore have been found in 
great quantities during our excavations we have the glorious possibility 
of reconstructing for ourselves the Civilisation of a long buried race, in 
as far as it was capable of expression in their manufacture and use of 
earthenware. 



Collection of Vases 135 



The adaptation of mineral dyes, the sifting of the clay, and then 
the discovery of the potter' s wheel and the furnace gave great impulse 
to the art of the potter, but these improvements and inventions did 
not become universal property. For a long time the finer glaze used 
in Greece gave her an advantage over other countries so that Greek 
vases were a much sought after commodity in the trade. 

In the earliest times, referred to as the Mycenean period, the vases 
were adorned with marine objects. Figures of men and animals are 
comparatively rare. Later, these gave place to socalled geometric de- 
signs, patterns originating partly at the weaver's loom. In contrast to 
this there developed the Corinthian style under Oriental influence in 
which the body of the vase is divided into bands filled in with animal 
figures. The Geometric style passes through the Early Corinthian be- 
fore giving way to the Corinthian proper. Corinthian vases also had a 
great vogue in Italy but were soon displaced by the Athenian which 
were first painted with black figures on a red ground and later with 
red figures on a black ground, in the latter case the body of the vase 
being entirely black. This is the golden age of Vase painting, which 
was followed by a steady decline. Vase painting was begun in Southern 
Italy just in the period of transition from the best to the later style. 

According to Patroni the vases were used there only for burial 
purposes and this conclusion he justifies by assuming that the scenes 
depicted represent the tomb itself or a continued existence in Elysium. 
Besides the painted vases there have been found in Campania Buccheio 
vases produced under Etruscan influence. These are permeated with a 
black dye and are seldom if ever found in Greek cities though they exist 
in large quantities in those towns which have been under Etruscan rule. 

The recent translation of the Vases in the present rooms has consi- 
derably interfered with their proper sequence but the available space 
was regrettably limited. The numbers of the various cases must therefore 
be noted. 

1939. Case I. contains the oldest specimens, similar to those exhi- 
bited in the prehistoric section. They belong for the most part to the 
iron age, some may be even older. The variety in colouring is usually- 
due to the varying degrees, of heat in the firing. 

1940. Case II. Campanian Bucchero ware. Notice especially an 
Oinochoe with an Etruscan inscription (limurce sta pruchum). The 
Bucchero vases of purely Etruscan origin (Case XV.) are somewhat 
different. 

1941. Cases III. - VII. Archaic Vases from Apulia. Those from 
Northern Apulia (Canosa) must be distinguished from those from Taren- 
tum and the Sallentine peninsula. 

1942. Case VIII. Vases with geometric designs from Cumae. 

Figured Vases. 
In the last room : 

1943. Case IX. Black figured vases from Campania. 
1944-1945. Cases X. - XI. Campanian imitations of Attic vases. 

1946. Cases XII. - XIII. Vases from Saticola (S. Agata dei Goti), 
for the most part imitations of Attic vases of the painted style. The 
vases, regular bell-shaped craterae, are mostly adorned with Bacchic 
scenes in front and draped figures at the back. 

1947. Cases XIV. - XV. Vases from Cumae. The shapes are various. 
The paintings have to do chiefly with funeral monuments. Note in 



136 



Top Floor 



Case XIV, to the left, on the second shelf N. 1990 *) depicting the 
apotheosis of Hercules and directly below it, N. 2231, Ariadne adorning 
herself for her marriage with Dionysus. 

1948. Case XVI. Vases from Abella. They resemble those from 
Paestum in drawing, but differ in the shapes and colours. 

1949. Cases XVII. -XVIII. Vases from Paestum, amongst them one 
(N. 2873) representing Hercules with the Hesperides, the work of Assteas. 
Two others by the same artist (Cadmus with the dragon, Fig. 121, and 

Phrixos with Helle) 
1 are placed on Cases 
XXVI. and XIX. 
Paestum according 
to its pottery belongs 
rather to Campania 
than to Lucania. 

1950. Cases XIX.- 
XXIII. Vases from 
Lucanian factories. 

Notice especially 
those depicting bat- 
tle scenes in which 
the differences be- 
tween Oscan-Campa- 
nian and Lucanian 
armour may be clear- 
ly seen. N. 3237, the 
madness of Lycur- 
gus, affords proof of 
that preference for 
gruesome subjects in 
which the Lucanians 
resembled the Etru- 
Fig. 121. Cadmos with the dragon. scan artists - 

1951. Cases XXIV. - XXXVII. Vases from Apulia and the factories 
of Ruvo and Canosa. Notice on the lowest shelf of Case XXVII. 
N. 3231, the Theft of the Palladium and the contest between Apollo 
and Marsyas (Fig. 122). The drawing here approximates to that on the 
Attic vases (N. 2910, to the right on the second shelf of Case XXX). 
Diomedes with the steeds of Rhesos. The platters decorated with 
fishes remind one that fish was served and eaten on them originally. 
The inner grooved portion was for the sauce. 

In the room of the Greek Vases : 

1952. Case XXXVIII. Vases painted red after firing. On the top 

shelf, N. 2069, an oinochoe, is similar in style to the vases from Pae- 
stum and Abella. 

1953. Case XXXIX. Vases from Gnathia, mostly decorated with 
ornamental patterns without figures. One vase, on the middle shelf to 
the right, depicting a comedy actor, is interesting. 

A remarkable feature in Italic pottery, especially that of Canosa, is 




*) The numbers here given of single vases are those on the ted 
labels (often very faded} and refer to Heydemann' s Catalogue. 



Collection of Vases 



137 



the enormous size of some of the vases, which are now exhibited singly 
on bronze tripods in many of the rooms. 
Room I. 

1954 (3239). Large Amphora with volutes, from Canosa. It represents 
Zeus with other gods and heroes, but having been considerably resto- 
red it is impossible to decipher accurately. From Canosa. 

Room II. 

1955 (3252). Large Amphora with masks and inset reliefs. In front 
is a scene as yet unexplained. Below is Medea watching the struggle 
of Jason with the bull. On the other side a battle of Amazons and a 
Bacchic thiasos. 

1956 (3254). Vase from 
Canosa. Funeral Pyre of 
Patroclus before which 
Achilles slays the Trojan 
youths who are to ac- 
company him to the 
Underworld. On the right 
Agamemnon advances 
with an offering. Above 
are Phoinix and Nestor 
in Achilles' tent. Below 
one sees Achilles quadri- 
ga bearing the body of 
Hector. On the other 
side a Heroon, or grave 
monument surrounded 
by youths and maidens. 

Room III. 

1957 (3256). The lar- 
gest Vase of all , from 
Ruvo. It measures I m. 
55 in height and -2 m.45 
in circumference. The 
number of patches make 
it difficult to decipher 
but the battle of Amazons 
and the contest between 
Pelops and Oinomaus can 
be recognised. An unu- 
sual feature is the pain- 
ting round the base, de- 
picting a race. 

Room IV. 

1958 (3222). Vase with scenes of the Underworld. From Altamura. 
Orpheus strives with his music to touch the hearts of the rulers of the 
Underworld and induce them to restore his wife to him. He is surroun- 
ded by beings of the Underworld. Megara with her sons, Pelops with 
Hippodamia and Myrtilus, the three judges of the Underworld, Her- 
cules defeating Cerberus, Sisyphus with his burden, and the Danaids. 

Room V. 

1959 (3253). Persian Vase from Canosa found with N. 1956 (Fig. 123). 
In the centre of the principal scene the Persian King Darius is enthroned. 
Before him on a platform stands an orator and behind is a guard with 




:'--- '".'jtifk. 



Fig. 122. Apollo and Marsyas. 



138 



Top Floor 



a drawn sword. On either side are Persian princes summoned in coun- 
cil. Above, in the assembly of the gods is Hellas, while on the right 
appears Asia seated upon an altar. Near her is Apate, the goddess of 
Deceit, with two torches. In the lowest scene is the treasurer of the 
Royal household receiving tribute from the Provinces. The table at 
which he presides is arranged for accounts and upon it is marked 
10000 (M), jooo (X) etc. 

Room VI. 

1960 (15255). Archenioros Vase from Ruvo. On the neck are painted 







Fig. 123. Persian Vase. 

a siren and the contest between Pelops and Oinomaus ; on the body 01 
the vase the funeral obsequies of Archenioros. Hypsipyle who had 
been brought as a slave from Lemnos to Nemea was entrusted by the 
Queen Eurydice with the care of her infant son Opheltes of whom the 
Oracle had foretold that he would die if ever he touched the ground. 
On being asked by the band of warriors on their way to Thebes the 
whereabouts of a spring of water, the nurse laid the boy upon the 
ground a single moment in order to accompany Adrastus to the spring. 
Returning she finds the infant Opheltes killed by a serpent. Hypsipyle 
is about to be punished, but the seer Amphiaraus intercedes for her 
and she is simultaneously recognised and freed by her two sons Enneos 
and Thoas who are among the warriors. On the other side of the vase 
is depicted the adventure of Hercules in the garden of the Hesperides 
and on the neck Dionysus with his procession. 



Collection of Vases 139 



On columns in the various rooms : 

1961. Many other vases with Heroa (Graves). Note in Room III, 
near the window, the vase on which is depicted the dragging of Hec- 
tor's body around the tomb of Patroclus. 

In the corridor : 

1962. Four Amphorae with masks as handles. 
Passage leading to the Cumae Collection : 

1963. Models of Italic graves with accessory vases as excavated. 
In the large Room of the Attic Vases there is also : 

1964. Case XLI. containing Ionic or pseudo - Ionic vases, made in 
Etruria. 

1966. Cases XLII. - XLVI. Black figured Altic vases. Amongst 
these the Panathenaic Vases are worthy of especial notice. They were 
filled with oil and presented to the winners of the Panathenaic contests. 
They bear inscriptions to this effect. 

1967. Case XLVI I. contains vessels showing the transition from 
the black to the red figured style. 

1968. Cases XLVIII. - XLIX. Red figured Attic vessels. There are 
no remarkably fine specimens in this collection. 

1969. Cases L. - LIV. Red figured Vases of Attic manufacture. 
These are usually called Nolanic because they were found in large 
quantities at Nola. 

1970. Cases LV. Bucchero Vases from Etruria. Campanian black 
painted cups. Notice amongst them a patera with the inscription L. 
CANOLEIOS. L. F. FECIT. CALENOS. 

The principal examples of red figured Attic work are exhibited in 
the large show case in the centre of the room. 
Beginning below on the right : 

1971 (2422). Hydria discovered at Nola in 1797. It formed part of 
the Vivenzio Collection. It was used as a cinerary urn and found en- 
closed in a terra-cotta vessel which is also preserved in the National 
Museum. Upon the hydria is represented the Iliupersis, or downfall of 
Troy. Priam, seated at an altar with the dead body of Astyanax on 
his knees, awaits the death blow of Neoptolemus. On either side are 
scenes of terror. To the right Andromache, armed with a pestle, is 
striking a blow at a Greek soldier. To the left Cassandra is being torn 
from the statue of Athena. The departure of Aeneas and the recognition 
of Aithra by her two grandchildren complete the picture at either side. 

1972 (2421). Amphora with volutes, from Ruvo, depicting a battle 
of Amazons. On the neck, Peleus and Thetis. 

1973 (3233). Hydria, much damaged in the funeral pyre. On it are 
painted female jugglers. 

Above : 

1974 (2410). Two-handled Vase from Nocera. Bacchic festival. Dione 
pours out wine. She is surrounded by riotous Bacchantes. 

1975 (3240). Amphora with volutes, from Ruvo. Preparations for the 
performance of a satiric drama. 

1976 (3251). Amphora with volutes, from Ruvo. A wild boar and a 
doe hunted by Orientals. 



I4Q Top Floor 

On a marble table under glass : 

1977. Three Attic vases with reliefs and gilding (fight with a grif- 
fin, Marsyas, hunting scene). 

In the dark room leading to the Cumae Collection : 

1978. Vases from Canosa, shaped like wineskins, with many figures 
attached. (Fig. 124). 




Fig. 124. Vase of Canosa (Phot. Brogi). 



In the centre show case : 

1979. Specimens of vases with designs stamped in relief, terra 
sigillata. They are similar to the Aretine vases and are supposed to 
come from Gaul. 

Around the room, on columns : 

1!W>. Amphorae with masks a* handles and with reliefs executed on 
the necks. 



Cumae Collection 



141 



The Cumae Collection 

The Vases and other Objects found in 1856 during the excavations 
at Cumae were given to the Museum by Prince Carignano. To these 
are added the Stevens Collection which has unfortunately been disper- 
sed in part. 

Room I. 
On columns : 
1981 (85868, 85870, &58T2). Vases with the customary Heroon. 




Fig. 125. Theseus fighting the Amazons. 

In the centre : 

1982 (86497). Presumably a wax mask. It was found during excava- 
tions, by the Count of Syracuse instead the head of a corpse. 

Betwaen the windows: 

1983. Marble Bust of Prince Carignano, the donor of the Collection. 
To the left of the entrance: 

1984. Case I. Corinthian and black Italic vases. 

1985. Case II. Black vases, lamps, vessels of local manufacture. 



142 Top Floor 

1986. Case III. Above, antefixae. Below a medley of vases of the 
most diverse styles. 

1987. Case IV. Various vases, some coated with white paint. 

Room II. 
In the centre under a glass shade : 

1988 (86496). Aryballos. Theseus fighting the Amazons. (Fig. 125). 
On a column : 

1989 (86060). Attic Crater. Women playing the cithara. 




Fig. 126. Vase with representation of the I'nderwold. 



In a sho\vcase : 

1900 (85885). A lady's toilet case with contents. 

On the five cases : 

1991. Bronze Vases. 

The cases contain for the most part painted vases of Attic origin. 

1992. Case I. Redfigured Attic vases, amongst them a remarkable 
fragment depicting the divinities of light. (86309). 

1993-1995. Cases II. - IV. Black figured Attic vases. Notice especially 
on the upper shelf of the case one representing an undraped woman 
riding a panther. 



Collections Cumae and Stevens 



1996. Case V. Attic and local vases with rich polychrome decorations. 
Amongst them is one dealing with the legend of Telephos. To ensure his 
own safety Telephos has seized the infant Orestes and fled for protection 
to an altar. He threatens to slay the child unless Agamemnon promises 
him safe conduct and healing of the wound inflicted by Achilles. 

Room III. 

In the centre : 

1997. Archaistic Marble head of Dionysus, considerably restored in 
antiquity. 

1998. Show Case I. Beautiful collection of Phoenician glass vases etc. 

1999. Show Case II. Fibulae and other ornaments of silver and amber. 
On columns : 

2000-2001. Mixing bowls. 

Upon the five wall cases : 

2002. Cauldron and other bronze vessels. 

2003-2005. Cases I. - IV. Various vases. 

2006. Case V. Objects made of bronze, glass and alabaster. 




The Stevens Collection 

2008-20U. Various gold and silver objects. Early Corinthian and Rho- 
dian ware, also Attic vases, Phoenician glass, bone utensils etc. all of 
which are arranged according to the giaves in which they were found. 

2015. In the last Vase Room is a show case containing the results 
of the excavations made in 1902 amongst the graves of Cumae. Close by 
the north wall of the city four graves were found in the burial ground. 
The first contained articles dating from the second or third centuries. 
The three others belong to an earlier period, perhaps to the seventh cen- 
tury B. C. Patroni however dates them even further back into the eighth, 
one perhaps end of the or ninth centuries B. C. 



144 Top Floor 

From the Room of the Greek Vases one goes to the right to visit 

The Santangelo Collection 

It was formed by the Marchese Santangelo during his official 
career, especially in the Basilicata, bought subsequently from his heirs 
by the Municipality and lent to the Museum. 







Fig. 128. Adonis Vase. 
Principal Room. 

In the centre case : 

2016. Attic and Italic Vases. Notice especially the vase found in Ar- 
mento (Basilicata) depicting the death of Meleager. To avenge the death 
of her brother, his uncle, slain by Meleager , his mother Althaea con- 
demns him to death and casts the brand with which his life is mysteriously 
connected into the flames. Meleager, consumed by inward fire is held 
by his brother Tydeus and sister Ueianeira. His father appears in des- 
pair. Below are his companions of the Calydonian Hunt. Eros is here 
represented as Envy (##Vo) having awakened Meleager's passion for 
Atalanta, he is thus responsible for the whole tragedy. (Fig. 126). 

Beginning to the left of the entrance : 

2017-2018. Cases I. - V. Vases from Apulia and Lucania. 



Collection Santangelo and Coins 



At the end of the room : 

2019. Case I. Drinking horns fashioned in the form of animals 
heads. 

2020-2022. Cases II. - VII. Vases from Attica and Apulia. On a 
Chalcidian vase is depicted the contention of Apollo and Hercules for 
the tripod (Fig. 127). 

In the dark passage there are some very interesting vases. To the 
right quite in the background : 

2023. Pelike with the Rescue . 
of Andromeda. 

To the left : 

2024. Pelike. Struggle for the 
possession of the youthful Ado- 
nis and his further adventures 
(Fig. 128). 

The wall case contains : 

2027. Terra-cottas, lamps. 

2028. Large amphora with 
representation of Orpheus in the 
Underworld. 

Returning to the room : 

Cases to the right of the main 
entrance : 

2029. Vases from Apulia and 
Lucania. 

On a column to the left of 
the main entrance : 

2030. Panathenaic Amphora. 

Side room, in the cases and 
on columns : 

2031-2038. Small bronzes, ter- 
ra-cottas and single vases, also 
some small antiquities of Egyp- 
tian , Phoenician , and Roman 
origin. In the case to the right 
of the entrance , a little Athena 
with the owl (to the left on the top shelf (Fig. 129). 

2039-2041. Mosaics. Panther with Bacchic attributes. Comic Actor. 
Cock-fight. 

Collection of Coins 

2042-2043. This collection may be considered one of the most com- 
plete extant. It contains about 40000 coins, medals, stamps and seals. 
Of this number 12480 are Greek coins mostly from Magna Graecia and 
Sicily. There are many rare specimens but only the series of aes grave 
and a quantity of modern coins are exhibited. 




Fig. 129. Statuette of Athena. 



146 First Floor 

The Picture Gallery. 

Vestibule. 

On the right wall : 

1. (10529). Head of youth. Bronze, XVI. cent. 

2. Unknown Portrait Bust. White marble head, coloured raiment. 
Opposite the entrance : 

3. Napoleon I., plaster cast of original at Milan by Canova. 
On the left wall : 

4. (20823). Bust of Antonio Canova, made in 1810 for Joachim Murat 
by Antonio d'Este. 

5. (6137). Socalled Bust of Hannibal. Since 1904 this has been reco- 
gnised as a XVI. cent, production. 

Rooms I. and II. 
Tapestries by Bernhard van Orley. 

(Netherland School, XVI. cent.). 

An Historic Retrospect. 

When Charles V. came to Brussels in the year 1531 to hold a meet- 
ing of the States General, they decided to offer him a gift which should 
recall his most famous victory and with this intention they presented 
him with these tapestries depicting the battle of Pavia. This remarkable 
example of Dutch art adorned for many years the imperial Palace in 
Brussels. In 1564 Don Carlos, eldest son of Philip II., left them to his 
tutor, the Bishop of Osma, from whose possession they passed after 
many vicissitudes into the hands of the Marchese del Vasto, head of 
the Avalos family ; and he it was who bequeathed them to the Naples 
Museum. In many cases the names of the leaders are written under 
their portraits but for a clearer understanding of the incidents repre- 
sented a few remarks on the battle of Pavia are printed below. 

Since the invasion of Charles VIII. till the death of Henry II. the 
french Kings had constantly striven to unite the north of Italy with 
France. In spite of his youth and inexperience no sooner had Francis I. 
come to the throne than he hurriedly led an expedition across the Alps, 
won a victory at Melegnano but was subsequently defeated at Biesca, 
thereby losing Lombardy which had already been conquered by the 
French. In 1524, in order to put an end to these invasions, the imperial 
troops under the command of the Marchese Pescara and the Connetable 
de Bourbon marched from Italy into the south of France, but on arriving 
at Marseilles, they were obliged to beat a hasty retreat having come news 
of the imminent invasion of Northern Italy by Francis I. with a splendidly 
equipped army. As soon as the imperial troops had buried their ord- 
nance or safeguarded it at Toulon, they proceeded back to Italy and 
arrived only just in time. Both armies crossed the Ticiuo the same day. 
After an attempt to take Milan Francis directed his attention to the 
siege of Pavia, the capture of which would have been of great impor- 
tance to him, partly because it was one of the enemy's best fortified cities and 
partly because he hoped to induce the mercenaries garrisoned there to espo- 
use his cause and thus swiftly to decide the issue of the war. The imperial 



Picture Gallery 147 



troops which had retired to Lodi to await reinforcements from Germany 
advanced on Pavia which was courageously held for the emperor by 
the Marchese de Leyva. The citizens made common cause with the 
garrison and even women are reported to have assisted at the trenches, 
but food was scanty and there was no money for the soldiers pay, which 
added to the necessity for action. Francis had taken up his position in 
the Zoological Gardens to the north of the city. His troops consisted of 
many regiments of Swiss, the so called Black Band >; of mercenaries 
and A large detachment of light cavalry under Giovanni dei Medici 
besides a splendid host of french knights and their esquires. The impe- 
rial army approached from the northeast, made three breaches in the 
Park wall during the night and advanced through them into the midst 
of the French, who saw in the attack at first a mere skirmish, to which 
they paid little attention. Soon realising, however, th?t the fight was 
assuming greater importance, Francis at the head of his troop drove 
back the enemy's light cavalry, alter killing their leader, the Marchese 
Civita di S. Angelo. The French artillery also did much damage but the 
advance of the Imperial troops under Georg Frundsberjj and the on- 
slaught of the Marchese del Vasto's Spanish arquebusicrs altered the 
appearance of the field. The French cavallry were driven back, their 
canons taken and the sortie of the beleaguered garrison organised by 
de Leyva finally decided the fortunes of the day. The Swiss, hemmed 
in on all sides refused to advance, the Black Band were cut down or 
driven into the Ticino, the cowardly Due d'Alencon to whom Francis 
had given command of the rearguard fled across the river on a bridge 
of boats which he destroyed behind him, and poor Francis wandering 
aimlessly over the battlefield was taken prisoner, his horse having 
fallen under him. That evening he wrote from the monastery of S. Paolo 
whither he had been taken, to his mother : Madame, pour vous faire 
savoir comment se porte le reste de mon infortune, de toutes choses ne 
m'est demeure que 1'honneur et la vie qui est sauve . 

The Tapestries. 
Room I. to the right : 

1. The Attack of the yeoman and arquebusiers on the right wing of 
the French army. (H. 4,22, 1. 8,59). The Spanish arquebusiers advance 
from the left, surrounding their leader Pescara who is on horseback, 
directing the fighting. The German yeomanry are further to the right 
with their commander Georg Frundsberg wo stands beside the captu- 
red guns while his men are in the act of slaying with their lances 
Francis Duke of Lorraine (Fracoys de Lorain) and_ the Duke of Suffolk 
(la blanse rose) whose horses are foundering. The "turmoil of battle and 
the thronging lances are wonderfully depicted. The park wall is shown 
in the foreground. 

Near the window : 

2. The French Army opens out, the Swiss refuse to advance. 
(H. 4,25, 1. 8,69). The Swiss captain Diesbach (recognised on account 
of his tall lance) and a mounted officer, are endeavouring in vain to 
urge the troops forward. Some are still hesitating, others are already 
laying down their arms, banners and drums, prepariug to fly ; one man 
is shewn running away carrying two or three hens. Sauve qui peut 
seems to be the order of the day. 

On the exit side : 

3. The soldiers of the Slack Band being almost all slain, the yeo- 
manry storm the French King's fortified Camp. (II. 4,25, 1. 8,09). On 

10* 



148 First Floor 

the right is the entrenchment with tents, one of which adorned with 
fleur de lys is evidently the King's. From the left the garrison under 
de Leyva are rushing out of the town scattering those who had remai- 
ned in camp, amongst them several bold damsels ; others within the 
entrenchment are preparing to seek refuge in flight. 
On the wall opposite the window : 

4. Flight of the Due d" Alencon across the Ticinus. (H. 4,20, 1. 7,78). 
To the right on horseback is the L>uc d'Alencon escaping over the 
pontoon bridge, which having crossed he then' destroys, so that his 
followers fall inevitably into the hands of their mounted pursuers, or 
find a watery grave in the Ticinus. 

Room II. on the right : 

5. Continuation of the battle. (H. 4,10, 1. 8,81). The Swiss soldiers 
driven into the Ticinus. The storming of the camp by the beleaguered 
garrison and the flight and ultimate end of the Swiss regiments is fur- 
ther depicted. In the background is the city of Pavia with her many 
turrets, the cathedral being especially noticeable and the guarded bridge 
over the Ticinus. In the foreground are the Swiss, laden with their 
most treasured belongings, routed and hard pressed by their enemies. 
Many who during the battle had sought refuge in empty cisterns reap- 
pear as the fighting draws to an end. The river is full of swimmers and 
drowning men. 

On the wall opposite the window : 

.6. Francis I. in action. (H. 4,20, I. 8,57). On the right one sees the 
French King (or one of his representatives), engaged with the leader of 
the imperial cavalry, the Marchese Civita di S. Angelo. The king has 
shattered his opponents spear with a sword stroke and is in the act ol 
administering the death blow. In the foreground he is represented again 
preparing to charge with his mounted bodyguard. The king may be 
recognised by the fleur de lys on his horse's breastpiece. The arquebu- 
siers under the command of the Marchese del Vasto are advancing un- 
der the trees of the Park and in the distance the cavalry are drawn up 
in battle array. 

On the exit wall : 

7. The sun-ender of Francis 1. (H. 4,00, 1. 8,00). On the left is 
Lannoy the Viceroy dismounting to receive the French King's sword in 
token of surrender. The King's horse has fallen and he is pinned to 
the ground. A soldier is tugging at the horse's tail and two others have 
seized the King under the shoulders and are helping him to rise. In 
the centre are the commander in chief of the imperial troops and two 
other officers, all three with swords drawn ; on the right, one yeoman 
is seen telling another the joyful news of the French defeat and the sur- 
render of their King. Victory is the motto of this picture and the 
bells seem to proclaim the good tidings from the many towers and bel- 
fries which rise in the background. 

8. Gobelin tapestry representing the story of Perseus. (H. 4,80, 1. 5,60). 
In the centre at the bottom is the interlaced LL. of Louis XIV. 

In Rooms I. and II. may also be found : 

9. Six portrait busts of roinaii emperors of white and coloured 
marble, XVI. cent. 

Also in Room I. 

10 (4887). Colossal horse's head. Bronze. Owing to its resemblance 
to the horse of Gattamelata in Padua this work was formerly ascribed 



Picture Gallery 



149 



to Donatello but has recently been declared antique. It was once in the 
possession of Lorenzo dei Medici and probably influenced Donatello who 
must have seen it then. In 1471, five years after Donatello's death, it 
was sent by Lorenzo to Count Maddaloni in Naples. The remarkable 
realism of some details seemed to authorise its ascription as a rena- 
scence work. Cf. Goethe Ital. Reise. 7. Mar. 1787. (Fig. 130). 

11 (10810). Vase of Rosso antico resting on a tripod, ornamented 
in the centre with a gorgon mask from which radiate elongated leaves. 

Room II. 

12 (10509). Bronze taber- 
nacle in the form of a round 
temple with cupola executed 
by Giovanni de Bernard! da 
Castelbolognese and Jacopo 
del Duca Ciliano from a 
sketch of Michel Angelo's, 
(approximate date 1560-1568), 
which had been designed for 
the church of Santa Matia 
degli Angeli in Rome. It 
stands on an octagonal base 
and is richly ornamented with 
reliefs. The centre is deco- 
rated below the frieze with 
eight panels in relief repre- 
senting the Passion of our 
Lord. There were originally 
pillars of lapis lazuli at each 
corner but these disappear- 
ed, simultaneously with other 
precious stones with which 
the work of art was adorned, 
when it was removed from 
the Farnese Palaceto the 
church of S. Lorenzo della 
Padula. 




Fig. 130. Horse's head from bronze. 



13 (10525). Vase of Alabaster. In the centre a Medusa head and 
Dionysian masks on the handles. 

14 (10526). Vase, similar to N. 13. 

Room III. Andrea da Salerno. 

(The index numbers are on the right hand side of the frame. The 
enumeration of the pictures according to this catalogue commences at 
the right and ends at the left of the entrance door. After the first men- 
tion of a painter's name the date and place of his birth and death are 
put in parenthesis as far as they are ascertainable). 

1 (84471, 84470, 84448). Netherland-Neapolitan School, XV. cent. 
The three Wise Men out of the East. (W. ; h. 1,31, 1. 0,63 h. 1,33, 
1. 1,25 h. 1,33, 1. 0,62). St. Joseph standing, in the centre, Mary with 
the shepherds who make their offerings to the Child, on either side 
stand the Magi. N. 84470 is a copy of an engraving by Martin Schon- 
gauer. 

2 (84027). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SAI.ERNO (* Salerno 
1480? f Gaeta ? 1530). St. Benedict. (W. ; h. 2,62, 1. 2,07). He is seated 



15 First Floor 

with a book and pastoral staff between St. Maurus and St. Placidus. A 
dispute is depicted below. 

3 (84223). Venetian School. XV. cent. St. Martin on horseback 
about to divide the cloak with his sword, the beggar stands before him. 
(W. ; h. 0,73, 1- 1,65)- 

4 (84248). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SALERNO. The Miracle 
of St. Francis before the walls of Gubbio. (W. ; h. 0,47, 1. 1,00). He is 
accompanied by the tame wolf. 

5 (84244). The Same. The Miracle of St. Nicolas, Archbishop of 
Myra. (W. ; h. 1,46, 1. 1,46). He hands golden apples to the three vir- 
gins of Myra and in so doing annuls the unjust death sentences. 

6 (84231). Giovanni Bernardo Lama (* Naples 1506, f Naples after 
1590). field. (W. ; h. 3,00, 1. 1,99). The Madonna has the dead body of 
Christ between her knees, and weeps bitterly. St. Bonaventura and 
St. Francis are beside her. 

7 (124647). Netherland-Neapoiitan School, XV. cent. St. Michael in 
armour with the dragon at his feet. (W.; h. 1,07, 1. 0,55). 

8 (84224). German School, XVI. cent. Madonna and Child. (W. ; h. 
o,93, 1, 0,67). 

9-11. (84466, 84440, 84461). German School, XV. cent. Pieta, a triptych. 
(W.; h. 1,30, 1. 0,65 h. 1,28, 1. 1,63 h. 1,30, 1. 0,65). The Madonna 
holds the dead Christ on her lap. Around her are grouped John and 
Magdalene, Joseph of Arimathia, Nicodemus and the two Marys. 

12 (84243). Umbrian School, XV. cent.? Madonna and Child with 
Saints, a triptych. (W. ; h. 3,03, 1. 2,45). On the base are Apostles and 
a resurrection, on either side St. Francis and St. Sebastian and Christ 
above. 

13 (84249). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SAI.ERNO. St. Benedict. 
(W. ; h. 1,49, 1. 0,53). 

14 (84194). School of Lorenzo di Credi, XVI. cent. Madonna and 
Child with little St. John. (W. ; h. 0,82, 1. 0,62). 

15 (84222). Giovanni Filippo Criscuolo (* Gaeta 1509, f 1584). The 
Nativity, a triptych (1545). (W. ; h. 2,36, 1. 2,00). In the centre the Vir- 
gin is worshipping the infant Christ while Joseph is in the act of cove- 
ring Him up with a cloth. On the right and left are s .ints. Signed : 
Jo JOANE FILIPPO CRISCUOLO DE NAPOLI PITTORE 1545. 

16 (125355). Francesco Fiorillo, XVI. cent. (School of Andrea da 
Salerno). Madonna and Child with Saints, a triptych. (VV. ; h. 1,87, 1. 1,72 
foot, h. 0,27, 1. 1,86). On the base Jesus in the midst of the apostles, 
on the side panels St. Donatus and another ; above, the crucifixion 
between St. Veneranda and St. Apollonia. 

17 (84229). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. St. Catherine of Siena 
wearing a crown of thorns and bearing in her hands a crucifix and a 
lily, is crowned by two angels. (W. ; h. 0,94, 1. 0,78). 

18 (84319). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. Magdalene. (W. ; h. 1,03, 
1. 0,55). 

19 (84232). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SALERNO. A virgin . 
martyr. (W. ; h. 1,63, 1. 0,54). 

20 (84337). Giovanni Angelo Criscuolo (* Gaeta 1510, t Naples 
after 1578). Adoration of the Magi. (W. ; h. 4,46, 1. 3,53). The Child on 
his Mother's lap receives rich gifts from the Magi, who appear with 
countless followers. 



Picture Gallery 151 



21 (84325). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. John the Baptist. (W. ; h. 
1,03, I- 0,55). 

22 (84237). Andrea SabatinI, called ANDREA DA SALERNO. John the 
Baptist. (W. ; h. 1,63, 1. 0,54). 

23 (84480). Mastro Colantonio? Netherland-Neapolitan School, XV. 
cent. St. Jerome with the lion. (W. ; h. 1,25, 1. 1,50). The saint is 
sitting beside his books, the lion stands in front and places one paw on 
his knee. On the left is the cardinal's hat. 

24 (84238). School of Michael of Verona, XVI. cent. Crucifixion. 
(W. ; h. 0,76, 1 1,15). Christ on the cross between the two thieves, 
below are armed men, mounted soldiers and the group of Marys. 

25 (84331). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. Madonna and Child with 
saints. (W. ; h. 1,87, 1. 0,95). Above the crescent moon the Madonna 
and Child float amidst the angelic host, the apostles James and Andrew 
stand below. 

26 (84228). Francesco Curia (* Naples 1538, f circa 1610). The Ma- 
donna with a wreath of roses, surrounded by saints. (W.; h. 2,06, 1. 1,64). 

27 (84442). Netherland-Neapolitan School, 2nd half of the XV. cent. 
One of the three Kings from the Orient carrying his sceptre and a 
gift, followed by his suite. (W. ; h. 1,98, 1. 0,71). 

28 (84252). School of Bruges, XV. cent. ? The archangel Michael 
fighting Satan. (W. ; h. 1,93, 1. 2,57).' On either side are St. Jerome and 
St. James with two devout persons. 

29 (84437). Netherland-Neapolitan School, 2nd half of the XV. cent. 
One of the three Kings. (W. ; h. 1,98, 1. 0,71). This youthful ruler ap- 
proaches with a staff and a gift. Companion picture to N. 27. 

30 (84245). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. St. George. (W. ; h. 1,12, 
1. 0,68). This picture is divided into two parts. Above St. Michael 
fights with the devil on the left and St. George with the dragon on the 
right. Below are John the Baptist and John the Evangelist, kneeling. 

31 (113206-113207). Umbrian School ? XV. cent. The Madonna and 
Saints. (W. ; h. 2,16, 1. 1,75 h. 0,37, 1. 1,68). 

32 (84241). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. Crucifixion. (W.; h. 1,14, 
1. 0,74). This picture is divided into two parts. Above is Christ on the 
cross between Mary and John, below is Mary with the Christ child on 
her lap. 

33 (84256). Girolanio Imparato (* Naples, f 1620). The Annunciation. 
(W. ; h. 2,11, 1. 1,82). 

34 (84185). Neapolitan School, XVI. cent. The Blessed Virgin bet- 
ween two saints. (W. ; h. 1,32, 1. 1,50). Signed: 1510. 

35 (84342). Neapolitan School, XV. cent. St. Giaconio della Marca 
stands in the attitude of benediction holding a book in his hand. 
(W. ; h. 1,87, 1. 1,16). On either side of him are kneeling angels. This 
picture is painted on a background of gold. 

36 (84221). School of Michele of Verona, XVI. cent. Crucifixion. 
(W. h. 1,04, 1. 2,63). Christ on the cross between the two thieves. The 
Virgin Mary has swooned in the midst of a group of women. 

37 (84250). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SALERNO. The 
reception of novices by St. Benedict. (W.; h. 0,35, 1. 0,40). 

38 (84242). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SALERNO. A saint of 
the Carthusian order. (W.; h. 0,73, 1. 0,33). 

39 (84253). The same. The coming of the Magi. (W.; h. 2,43, 1. 1,86). 



152 



First Floor 



The Virgin Mary with the Child and St. Joseph await the arrival of the 
Three Kings, advancing from the right. Above is the allegorical figure 
of Religion, enthroned, bearing in her hand the nails and the Cross. 

40 (84438, 84465, 84443). School of Martin Schongauer, XV. cent. 
The flight into Egypt. The Three Kings of Orient. 7 'fie Visitation. Trip- 
tych. (W.; h. 1,28, 1. 0,57 h. 1,49, 1. 1,19 h. 1,28, 1. 0,57). 

41 (84254). Andrea Sabatini, called ANDREA DA SALERNO. The in- 
vestiture of novices by St. Benedict. (W.; h. 0,34, 1. 0,41). Maurus and 
Placidus kneel before the saint, who blesses them. 

42 (84246). The Same. St. Paul. (W.; h. 0,73, 1. 0,33). 

43 (84239). Francesco Curia. The holy Family and saints . (W.; h. 1,16, 

1. 1,50). The little St. John 
leans against the Virgins 
knee. Beside him are two 
saints belonging to the Car- 
thusian order. 

In front of the window 
on the right : 

44 (10527) . Bronze bust 
of Ferdinand of Aragonia, 

probably by Guido Ma/,zoni, 
called il Modanino, or il PH- 
ganino (* Modena, f 1518). 
The head is covered with a 
cap from under which long 
curls hang down over the 
shoulders. He wears the col- 
lar of an order. 

Between the windows: 
45. Bronze Statuette of 
winged boy. School of Dona- 
tello. He stands on tiptoe 
with both arms raised. 

46 (10516). Bronze bust 
of Dante, XV. cent. The two 
syllables of his name DAN- 
TES are inscribed on the 
shoulders. From his cap two 
straps hang down over his 
Fig. 131. Dante (1 hot. Brogi). breast. (Fig. 131). 

IV. Neapolitan Schools, XVI. and XVII. centuries. 

1 (84051). Dpmenico Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO (Naples 1600- 
1675). Moses brings forth water from a rock. (C.; h. 0,74, 1. 1,00). Around 
him are the thirsty people. 

2. Andrea Vaccaro (Naples 1598-1672). St. Sebastian, nude, with his 
hands fastened above his head. (C.; h. 1,97, 1. 1,25). 

3. (84234). Ippolito Borghese (t after 1620). After the descent from 
the cross. (C.; h. 1,15, 1. 0,85). The body of Christ supported by a wo- 
man. Beside her the Madonna weeping. 

4 (84362). Luca Giordano, called LUCA FA PRESTO, (* Naples 1632, 
t 1705). Descent from the Cross. (C.; h. 2,20, 1. 3,44). The dead body 




Picture Gallery 153 

of Christ is borne to the grave where the Madonna and other pious 
women are waiting. A realistic picture full of dramatic feeling. Signed: 
JORDANUS F. 

5 (84428). Bernardo Roderigo, called BERNARDO SICILIANO (* Messi- 
na 1606, t 1687). The Virgin Maria seated on a throne, below her in 
adoration kneels St. Idelfonso with outstretched arms. (C.; h. 2,23, 1. 1,55). 

6 (84230). Giambattista Caraccio (* Naples 1570, f 1637), Assumption. 
(C.; h. 2,40, 1. 1,66). 

7 (84074). Nicola Vaccaro , son of Andreas (* Naples 1634 , f 1700). 
The disciples of Emmaeus (C. ; h. 1,03, 1. 1,25). The two disciples with 
Christ between them. Landscape with rocks and hills in the distance. 

8 (84073). School of Massimo Stazioni, XVII. cent. Virgin and Child. 
(L.; h. 0,75, ' 0,62). The Virgin gazing up to Heaven; the Child has a 
rose in His hand. 

9 (84077). Domenico Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO. Adoration of 
the Shepherds. (C.; h. 1,28, 1. 1,80). The Shepherds approach with gifts 
to do hommage to the Madonna and infant CVirist. On the left is a 
building with a colonnade from which spectators are eagerly watching 
the scene. 

10 (84436). Luigi Roderido, called n. SICILIANO (* Messina, worked 
at Naples in the early part of the XVII. cent.). The Trinity, floating 
above a garland of cherubs, adored by St. John the Baptist and St. Francis. 
(W.; h. 3,53, 1. 2,35). Signed: ALOYSIUS RODRIGO MESSINENSIS FACIEBAT. 

11 (84052). Nicola De Simone (School of Massimo Stanzioni, XVII. 
cent.). A virgin martyr holding a dagger in her right hand and the 
palm of victory in her left. (C.; h. 0,73, 1. 0,61). 

12. Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Horatius Codes. (C.; h. 1,03, 
I- 1,25)- 

13, 14, 17, 18, (84365, 84346, 84372, 84353). Cesare Fracanzano (Bar- 
letta, worked at Naples in the early part of the XVII. cent.). Heads of 
Apostles. (C. ; h. 0,56, 1, 0,48). 

15. Josfc De Ribera, callea Lo SPAGNOLETTO (* Naples 1652). Flay- 
ing of Marsyas. (C.; h. 1,79, 1. 2,28). Apollo commences to flay his 
opponent who is bound hand and foot. On the right are satyrs looking 
on. Signed: JUSEPE DE RIBERA ESPANOL VALENCIANO F. 1637. 

16 (84387). Paolo Domenico Finoglia ( * Orta near Aversa, t 
Naples 1656). St. Bruno. (C.; h. 3,14, 1. 1,98). The Madonna and Child 
floating amongst clouds. The infant Christ hands a book containing the 
rules of his order to St. Bruno who kneels below on the right. 

19 (84364). Nicola Vaccaro. Flight into Egypt. (C.; h. 1,04, 1. 1,25). 
The Virgin and Child seated in the centre worshipped by two angels. 

20 (84083). Domenico Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO. The Mar- 
tyrdom of S. Sebastian. (C.; h. 1,31, 1. 1,85). The saint is bound to a 
tree on the right, a band of warriors approaches from the left headed by 
an emperor in a biga. 

21 (83992). Sclpione Pulzone, called IL GAETANO (* Gaeta 1550, f 1588). 
The Annunciation. (C. ; h. 2,30, 1. 1,61). The Virgin Mary is about to 
fall upon her knees whilst the angel raises his hand to God on high 
from whom he brings his message. Signed : SCIPIO PULZONIS CAETANUS 

FACIEBAT 1.587 ROMAE. 

22 (84407). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Alexander II. conse- 
crating the church at Monte Cassino. A Sketch. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 1,27). 



154 First Floor 

St. Benedict surrounded by angels floats above the pious multitude who 
are seen praying below. In the background may be seen the arches and 
pillars of the new church. 

23 (116066). The same. St. Nicola di Bari transfigured, surrounded 
by angels. (C.; h. 1,78, 1. 0,95). A Sketch for a fresco in the church of 
St. Brigitta in Naples 1655. 

24 (81424). Domenico Viola (Naples XVII. cent.). The Tribute 
Money. (C.; h. 1,29, 1. 1,02). Christ conversing with three Pharisees. 

25 (84022). Luca Giordano, called FA PRKSTO. The Madonna with a 
wreath of roses. (C.; h. 2,52, 1. 1,91). On high the Virgin and Child who 
hands the wreath of roses to St. Domenic. Beside him stand St. Francis 
and an unknown saint. On the right are St. Catharine, St. Clare and 
one other. Signed : LUCAS JORDANUS F. 1657. 

26. The same. Jacob's Dream. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 1,03). Intended for a 
ceiling. 

27. Andrea Vaccaro. Mary Magdalene resting her head on her left 
hand. (C.; h. 0,66, 1. 0,55). 

28 (84359). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Salome. (C.; h. 0,80, 
1. 0,64). Half length portrait of a woman, bearing the head of John the 
Baptist on a charger. 

29 (84064). The same. Venus and Cupid asleep. (C.; h. 1,63, 1. 2,11). 
The background is a curtain hung between two columns. Venus lies 
sleeping on a white pillow with Cupid beside her. A Satyr throws 
reflected light from a mirror on to her nude body. 

30 (84403). The same. The Madonna and Child, enthroned Bunder a 
baldacchino supported by angels, is adored by saints, women and chil- 
dren. Other Angels sprinkle flowers upon her. (C.; h. 4,30, 1. 2,40). 

31. The same. The Burial of Jesus. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 1,03). .The Body 
of Jesus is carried to the grave by Joseph of Arimathia and Nico- 
demus. 

32. Cesare Fracanzanp. St. Hieronymus. Half length. (C.; h. 0,75, 
1. 0,62). The Saint is reading and supporting his head with his right hand. 

33. (84388). Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. Girl with dove. (C.; h. 
0,71, 1. 0,56). 

34 (84012). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRKSE (* Taverna 
1613, t Malta 1699). The Fall of Satan. (C.; h. 2,32, 1. 1,79). On the 
right stands Jesus exorcising the devil who plunges with outstretched 
arms into the deep. A beautiful picture almost equal to the Tintoretto 
in the church of S. Rocca in Venice. 

35 ^4401). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Salome, richly ador- 
ned, is sitting at meat. The head of John the baptist is brought to her 
by a servant woman. (C.; h. 0,78, 1. 1,00). 

36 (84008). Pietro Novell), called IL MONREALKSK (* Monreale 1603, 
t Palermo 1647). St. Paul, clad in a red cloak bearing a sword and a 
book. (C.; h. 1,25, 1. 0,951. Before him lies the head of a broken idol. 

37. Andrea Vaccaro. Magdalene. (C.; h. 0,51, 1. 0,76). 

38 (83987). The Same. Holy Family. (C.; h. 1,26, 1. 0,97). 

39 (84134). Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. Christ walking on the 
waves. (C.; h. 0,75, 1. 0,71). On his right St. Peter, close to the fishing 
smack. A fine landscape with a tower on the left, and a sailing boat in 
the distance. 



Picture Gallery 155 

40. Andrea Vaccaro. Magdalene. (C.; h. 0,50, 1. 0,76). 

41 (84398). Pietro Novell!, called IL MONREALE. Judith decapitating 
Holofernes. (C.; h. 2,40, 1. 1,63). 

42 (84409). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRESE. St. John 
the Baptist seated on a rock holding a cross in his right hand. (C.; h. 
1,83, 1. i,44)- Beside him is a lamb. Landscape background. 

43 (84406). Massimo Stanzioni (* Fratta 1585, t Naples 1656). The 
Holy Family. (C.; h. 0,54, 1. 0,46). The infant John offers fruit to the 
Christ child. St. Joseph stands beside the Virgin. 

44 (125121). Manner of Luca Giordano (XVII. cent.). Christ, lied to 
a pillar, is scourged by serving men. (C.; h. 0,46, 1, 0,34). 

45 (131152). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRESE. Absalom 
has his immodest brother slain. (C.; h. 2,02, 1. 2,97). 

46 (81385). Andrea Vaccaro. The Massacre of the. Holy Innocents. 
(C.; h. 2,68, 1. 3,91). The Mothers seek to defend their babes against 
the attacks of Herod's myrmidons. A fine picture. 

47 (84410). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABERSE. The 
Plague of 1656. (C.; h. 1,27, 1. 0,75). On high the Madonna and Child 
surrounded by saints and angels ; below the dead bodies of those who 
have died of plague. A fine study for a fresco. 

48 (84347). Francesco De Rosa, called PACECCO (* Naples about 
1580, t 1654). Jacob and Rachel. (C.; h. 1,30, 1. 0,83). Jacob with a dog 
approaches Rachel who stands by her flocks on the right. 

49 (81422). The same. The Baptism of St. Candida. (C.; h. 3,82, 
1. 2,51). Amidst a crowd of witnesses the apostle baptises the Saint. A- 
bove is a circle of angels. 

50 (84016). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRESE. S. Nicola 
di Sari. (C.; h. 2,17, 1. 1,56). The saint with arms outspread is being 
escorted up to Heaven by angels. 

51 (84338). Abate Francesco Guarino da Solofra (* Solofra 1611, 
f- Naples 1654). St. Cecilia crowned by an angel. (C.; h. 1,24, 1. 1,52). 

52 (84414). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRESE. A sketch 
for No. 47. (C. ; h. 1,27, 1. 0,75). 

53 (84384). Fabrizio Santafede (* Naples 1560? f Naples 1634). The 
Nativity. (C.; h. 3,72, I. 2,39). Mary and Joseph kneel in adoration with 
the shepherds, on high is the angelic host. Signed : F. S. 

54 (131153). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRESE. Belshaz- 
zars Feast. (C.; h. 2,04, 1. 3,07). The King points to the three words 
written in fiery characters. A fine example of south Italian work. 

55 (84413). The same. The Return of the Prodigal. (C.; h. 2,55, 
' 3>67). The father, surrounded by many members of his household wel- 
comes his son back. 

56 (81007). Pietro Novelll, called IL MONREALHSE. The Virgin has 
prostrated herself beneath an archway and gazes up devoutly to the 
Trinity. (C.; h. 2,87, I. 1,75). 

57 (84418). Mattia Preti, called IL CAVALIERE CALABRESE. Judith 
gazing up to Heaven triumphantly. (C.; h. 1,88, 1. 1,42). On the bed to 
the right lies Holofernes, dead. 

68 (84240). Francesco Curia. The Madonna and Child appear on 
high, surrounded by angels, distributing rose wreaths to various knee- 
ling saints. (C.; h. 2,96, 1. 2,20). 



156 First Floor 

59 (81393). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. The wedding of Cana 
in Galilee. (C. ; h. 0,78, 1. 0,99). 

60 (84402). Andrea Vaccaro. Magdalen holding a skull in her left 
hand. (C.; h. 1,30, 1. 1,01). 

61. Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. An old woman with a light. 
(C.; h. 0,50, 1. 0,75). 

62 (84233). Ippolito Borghese. Pieta. (C.; h. i,n, 1. 0,88). To the 
left a group of holy women are supporting the dead body of Christ. On 
the right is the Madonna, on her knees weeping ; in the background 
are the crosses on Golgotha. 

63 (84349). Massimo Stanzioni. Lucrezia seated, with arms outspread, 
holding a dagger in her right hand. (C.; h. 2,08, 1. 1,83). 

64 (84417). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Christ before Pontius 
Pilate. (C.; h. 0,48, 1. 0,68). Pilate is seated to the right with a dish 
on his lap. Christ stands in the centre between His guards. 

65 (84350). School of Luca Giordano (XVII. cent.). S. Francesco di 
Paola. (C.; h. 0,76, 1. 0,60). The saint lays his left hand on his breast 
and gazes devoutly heavenward. 

66 (84066). Abate Francesco Guarino da Solofra. Susannah and the 
Elders. (C.; h. 2,07, 1. 2,55). She is seated on the right and has dipped 
her feet into the water. At the sudden appearance of the lascivious 
elder she utters a loud cry and hastily covers herself. 

67 (84386). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Two saints. (C.; h. 
' 0,48, 1. 0,69). S. Francesco Saverio baptising oriental converts. S. 

Francesco Borgia serving mass. Signed : 1685. 

68 (84408). The same. Christ shown to the people. (C.; h. 0,48, 1. o,6j). 
The crowd is curiously clad in Dutch apparel. 

69 (84076). School of Massimo Stanzioni (XVII. cent.). St. Rosa of 
Lima. (C.: li. 0,77, 1. 0,64). She hu Ids a bowl of flowers and fruit from 
which an angel is helping himself. 

70 (84369). Massimo Stanzioni. Adoration of the Shepherds. (C.; h. 2,52, 
1. 2,02). Christ lies in a cradle. Mary, Joseph and shepherds kneel around. 

In front of the window : 

71. Glass Case. To be observed on the top shelf: (10109) rectangular 
ebony casket with agate feet, richly ornamented with coloured mosaic 
flowers and fruit. Coloured opus sectile (10236). Deer and Tiger : 
1 10237) ; Bear hunt; (10278) Bird; (11232) Bird. On the middle shelf: 
(10185) Octagonal ebony casket, inlaid with coloured stones. (10279). A 
bird. Opus sectile; (10709) Bronze crab; (10711) Bronze bird. On the 
bottom shelf: (10204) Amber casket ; (10201-2-3) Three pictures in opus 
sectile (10238). Coloured relief of the Virgin Mary and the angel Gabriel. 

Between the first and second windows : 

72 (5585) Head of Youth. Bronze, XVI. cent. 

73. Bust of man with a cloak, Bronze, XVI. cent. 

In front of the second window : 

74 (5611). Bronze statue of a sacrificial attendant (camillus). A work 
of the XVI. cent. Formerly erroneously considered antique. 

Between the second and third windows : 

75 (10510). Bust of a man with a beard. Bronze, XVI. cent. 

76 (10575). Bust of Caracalla (copy of an antique) Bronze, XVI. 
cent. Cf. No. 979. 



Picture Gallery 157 

In front of the third window : 

77. Glass Case. To be observed on the top shelf: (10214). A snuffbox 
of petrified wood; various objects of crystal. On the middle shelf: (10188) 
A dagger with inlaid blade; (10231-2). Two miniature wax heads; (10283) 
Carved crystal dish; (10809) Marble figure of a nude woman represent- 
ing on one side Life and on the other Death. On the bottom shelf: 
(10186) A dagger with jewelled hilt; (10926) A reputed foot print of Je- 
sus Christ framed in mother of pearl; (10226, 10199) Two dishes of car- 
ved crystal. 

Room V. Neapolitan Schools XVII. and XVIII. cent. 

1 (84363). Giovanni Battista Ruoppolo (* Naples 1620, f circa 168^). 
Fruit and Flowers. (C.; h. 0,97, 1. 1,34). 

2, 3. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Flowers. (C.; h. 0,50, 1. 0,40 
h. 0,45, 1- >33). 

4, 5. Manner of Gaspare Lopez, flowers. (C. ; h. 1,09, 1 1,75 h. 1,05, 
I- 1,59)- 

6 (84342). Neapolitan School, XVII cent. John the Baptist. (C.; h. 
i, 20, 1. 0,99). 

7, 8. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Drinking Scenes. (C. ,-11.0,74,1.0,98). 

9 (84373). Paolo De Matteis (* Cilento near Salerno 1633, t Naples 
I733)- Maty in Paradise. (C.; h. 1,58, 1. 2,07). In the presence of many 
believers the Virgin is caught up into heaven and received by God the 
Father and Jesus Christ. 

10. Giacomo Fareili (* Naples 1624, t 1706). An Allegory. (C.; h. 2,27, 
I. 1,54). 

11. Ascanio Luciani (t Naples 1706). Ruins. (C.; h. 0,56, 1. i,2j). 

12. Giacinto Diana, called n, POZZOLANO (* Pozzuoli 1730, f Naples 
circa 1800). The Dawn. (C.; h. 1,25*. 1. 1,54). 

13. Francesco De Mura, called FRANCESCHIELLO (* Naples 1696, f 
Naples 1782). The death of Joseph, (t,".; h. 2,83, 1. 1,52). The dying man 
is received by Jesus Christ into everlasting felicity. 

14 (84370). G. P. Ruoppolo. Fruit. (C.; h. 0,97, 1. 1,34). 
15,16. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Mythological Fantasies. (C.; 
h. 0,67, 1. 0,57). 

17. Francesco Celebrano (* Naples 1729, f 1814). The Sacrifice of 
Elias. (C.; h. 2,3;, 1. 1,17). 

18. Gaspare Lopez, called GASPARK DAI FIORI (*. Naples after 1650, 
t Venice or Florence 1732). Flowers and Fruit. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 0,73). 

19. Francesco Solimena, called I.'ABBATE Ciccio (* Nocera dei Pa- 
gani 1657, f Naples 1747). Portia and Brutus. (C.; h. 2,07, 1. 1,79). 

20. Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. An Allegory. (C.; h. 1,27, 
1- 2,50). 

21. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Flowers in a vase. (C.; h. 0,46, 
-1. 0,46). 

22. jacopo del Po (* Rome 1654, t Naples 1726). Majesty an allego- 
rical figure. (C.; h. 1,15, 1. 0,68). 

23. G. B. Ruoppolo. Flowers and Fruit. (C.; h. 2,52, 1. 3,34). The 
fertility of the Neapolitan country finds expi^ssion in this picture. 



158 First Floor 

24. Giuseppe Simonelli (* Naples 1649 -f 1713). Esther and Ahasae- 
rus. (C.; h. 2,22, 1. 2,55). The king seated on his throne points out his 
proffered gifts to Esther who kneels at his feet. 

25. Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Venus lying nude on a couch. 
Cupid aims an arrow at her. (C.; h. 1,37, 1. 1,90). 

26. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Flowers in a vase. (C.; h, 0,46, 
1. 0,46). 

27. Jacopo del Po. Beauty, an allegorical figure. Cf. N. 22. (C.; h. 
1,15, 1. 0,68). 

28. Francesco Solimena called L'ABBATE Ciccio. The death of Vir- 
ginia. (C.; h. 2,07, 1. 1,79). A maid supports the dead body of the girl; 
her father stands on the right in despair. 

29. Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. An Allegory. (C.; h. 1,27, 1. 
2,50). Venus carried across the sea. 

30 (84361). Abate Andrea Belvedere (* Naples 1646, f Naples 1726). 
Flowers and Fruit. (C.; h. 1,00, 1. 1,28). 

31 (84377). Domenico Antonio Vaccaro (* Naples 1681, t J75<>). The 
Assumption, a sketch. (C.; h. 2,07, 1. 1,27). Below in the foreground are 
several believers imploring the grace of the Virgin. 

32 (84072). Luca Forte (Naples, XVIII. cent.). Fruit. (C.; h. 0,75, 
1. 1,01). 

33. Gaspare Lopez, called GASPARE DAI FIORI. Flowers and fruit. 
(C.; h. 0,74, 1. 1,01). 

34 (84354). Luca Giordano called FA PRESTO. Battle scene. (C.; h. 
1,19, 1. 1,73). Cavalry encounter on a bridge. 

35. Manner of Andrea Belvedere. Flowers and fruit. (C.;h. 0,70, 1.1,55). 

36 (84556). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. St. George. (C.; h. 
3,04, 1. 1,82). His spear having snapped whilst wounding the dragon he 
is finishing the fight with his sword. In the background is the rescued 
princess. 

37. Gaspare Lopez, called GASPARE DAI FIORI. A woman amidst flo- 
wers. (C.; h. 1,25, 1, 1.70). 

38 (84360). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Battle scene. (C. ; h. 
1,18, 1. 1,70). An amazon rushes into battle before the turreted walls of 
a fortified city. 

39. Manner of Andrea Belvedere. Flowers and Fruit. (C.;h.o,7o,l.i,55). 

40. Niccolo Maria Rossi (* Naples 1650, f 1700). The ascension of a 
saint. (C.; h. 2,93, I. 1,88). 

41 (84378). Sebastiano Conca (* Gaeta 1676, f Rome 1764). The Vir- 
gin and Child with St. Jacob of Galizia and St. Charles Borromeo. 
(C.; h. 0,87, 1. 0,62). 

42 (84876). Gaetano Martoriello (* Naples circa 1673, f circa 1723). 
Seascape. (C.; h. 0,75, 1. 0,61). A stormy sea dashing against a cliff. 

43 (131475). Francesco Solimena, called L'ABBATE Ciccio. Venus sur- 
rounded by Cupids. (C.; h. 0,31, 1. 0,37). 

44 (84355). Abate Andrea Belvedere. Flowers and Fruit. (C.; h. 1,00, 
1. 1,28). 

45 (84374). Gaspare Lopez, called GASPARE DAI FIORI. Woman and 
child amidst flowers. (C. ; h. 1,30, 1. 1,02). 

46. Manner Of Luca Giordano, XVI I. cent. St. Sebastian. (C.\h. 1,19,1.0,95). 



Picture Gallery 159 

47 (84075). Luca Forte. Fruit. (C.; h. 0,75, I. 1,00). 

48 (84435). Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. St. Jerome. (C.; h. 1,23, 
1. 1,00). 

49. Francesco Solimena, called L'ABBATE Ciccio. Allegory. (C.; h. 
2,05, 1. 1,27). 

50. Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Allegory. (C.; h. 1,17, 1. 1,69). 
The Discovery of America. 

51. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Flowers in a vase. (C.; h. 0,46, 
1. 0,46). 

52. Jacopo del Po. Fecundity, an allegory. (C.; h. 1,15, 1. 0,68). 

53. G. P. Ruoppolo. Flowers and Fruit; Cf. N. 23. (C.; b. 2,52, 1. 3,34). 
54 (113438). Domenico Brand! (* Naples 1653 f 1736). Shepherd and 

Flocks. (C.; h. 2,04, 1. 3,00). 

55. Paolo De Matteis? Pan and Syrinx. (C.; h. 1,33, 1. 1,83). 

56. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Flowers in a vase. (C.; h. 0,46, 
1. 0,46). 

57. Jacopo del Po. Fidelity ; an allegory. (C.; h. 1,15, 1. 0,68). 

58. Francesco Solimena, called L'ABBATE Ciccio. Allegory. Hercules 
with Hygiea? (C.; h. 2,05, 1. 1,27). 

59. Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. The Myth of Leto. (C.; h. 
1,17, 1. 1,69). 

To the right of the window : 

60 (112472). Marble statue of St. Francis of Assisl by J. Sammar- 
tino (Naples XVIII. cent.). 

To the left of the window : 

61 (10511). Marble statue of Modesty, a veiled figure holding a mir- 
ror in her right hand, by J. Sammartino. 

In the centre of the room : 

62. Statue of Laetitia Ramolino, mother of Napoleon, a plaster 
cast of the original by Canova. 

At the doors: 

63 Marble and alabaster busts representing the four seasons. XVIII. 
century- 
Room VI. Italian Masters, XV. and XVI. cent. 

1 (84326). Antonio Agostlno di Ser Giovanni, called ANTONIO DA FA- 
BRIANO (middle of the XV. cent.). St. Peter Damian in rich pontifical 
raiment ; his right hand extended in benediction. (W.; h. 0,79, 1. 0,42). 

2 (84263). Bartolomeo Caporall ? (Umbrian school, 2.nd. half of the 
XV. cent.). Virgin and Child. (W.; h. 0,78, 1. 0,45). The infant Jesus 
is held upright on a marble pedestal ; His right hand Is raised to bless, 
with His left He holds a swallow by a thread. Signed : 1484. 

3 (84189). Umbrian School, XVI. cent. Virgin and Child. (W.; h. 
0,80, 1. 0,56). Mary has the infant Jesus on her lap. The landscape 
behind Them is lit by the setting sun. 

4 (84044). Fra Bartolomeo della Porta ( * Florence 1475, + 1517). 
The Assumption. (W.; h. 3,03, 1. 2,00). On high the Madonna is 



160 First Floor 

surrounded by angels and cherubim ; below, St. John the baptist and St. 
Catherine kneel beside the empty sarcophagus. 

5 (130527). Cristoforo Scacco (of Verona). A triptych. In the centre 
are the Virgin and Child with God the Father above. To right and left 
are St. John the baptist and St. Francis of Assisi. (W.; h. 1,63, 1. 2,04). 

6 (83809). Polidoro Caldara, called POLIDORO DA CARAVAGGIO (* Cara- 
vaggio 1495, f Messina 1543). Christ bearing His cross, has fallen under 
its weight. (W.; h. 3,10, 1. 2,47). Two of the Jews assist Him to rise while 
a third makes some sign to the others. On the left the fainting Madonna 
is succoured by devout women. On the right are Mary Magdalene in 
despair and St. Veronica with the handkerchief. The back ground is a 
ravine ; in the far distance one can see soldiers and the outskirts of 
the city. Nearer at hand on the left of the picture some curious on- 
lookers are climbing a tree in order to have a better view of the scene. 

7 (84178). Umbrian School, XVI. cent. An episcopal saint. (W.; h. 
0,52, 1. 0,27). 

8 (84208). Ditto. Madonna and Child. (W.; h. 0,50, 1. 0,36). 

9 (84317). Ditto, XV. cent. St. Eleutheris holding the episcopal staff 
in his left hand is portrayed in the act of blessing the members of the 
Order of St. Maria of Velletri. (W.; h. 0,55, 1. 0,38). 

10 (84259). School of Siena, XV. cent. Madonna and Child. (W.; h. 
1,84, 1. 1,64). Mary has Jesus on her lap. Two angels hold a crown 
over her head and lay a scarf round her shoulders. To the left stands 
St. John the baptist and to the right St. John the Evangelist. 

11 (84264, 84296, 84314, 84269, 84304, 84270, 84318, 84275, 84276, 
84313). Netherland - Neapolitan School, XV. cent. ? The Assumption. 
Crucifixion and Portraits of various Saints. Polyptych. (W.; h. 1,60, 
1. 0,41 h. 0,83, 1. 0,42 h. 1,60, 1. 0,41 h. 0,87, 1. 0,42 h. 1,00, 1. 0,61 
h. 1,83, 1. 0,59 h. i, 60, 1. 0,41 h. 0,87, 1. 0,42 h. i, 60, 1. 0,46 h. 0,86, 
1. 0,44). In the centre panel is the assumption. God the Father receives 
the Virgin with open arms. Below this is Christ on the cross, between 
the Virgin and St. John. On the left in the top panels are Mary Mag- 
dalene with the box of ointment and St. Bernard of Siena ; below these 
St. Louis in pontifical vestments and St. Francis. On the right above 
are St. Clare holding a monstrance and St. Jerome with a cardinal's 
hat ; below St. Anthony of Padua and a virgin martyr. All ten pictures 
are painted on a gold ground. 

12 (84192). Matteo di Giovanni di Bartolo, called MATTEO DA SIENA. 
(* Borgo S. Sepolcro 1435, f Siena 1495). The Massacre of the Holy 
Innocents. (W.; h. 2,34, 1. 2,38). Herod seated on his throne gives his 
guards the order to slay the babes, who are defended, as far as in them 
lies by their unfortunate mothers. Signed : MATTEL'S JOHANNI DESENIS 
PINSIT MCCCC. XVIII (1488). 

13 (84217, 84210, 84204). Cristoforo Scacco ? Coronation of the Virgin. 
(W.; h. 1.59, ' > 6 ' h- l >45> ' i93 h- 1.59. ' 0,61). Triptych painted 
on a gold ground. Christ in the centre crowning the Madonna with a 
diadem and extending His right hand in benediction. God the Father 
appears on high surrounded by angels making music. On pedestals to 
right and left are an apostle writing in a book and a holy martyr bear- 
ing a banner. 

14 (84322). Umbrian School, XV. cent. Madonna and Child. (W.; h. 
1,54, 1. 1,45). The Madonna is crowned by two angels, on either side 
stand St. Francis and St. Jerome. In the background are souls releas- 
ed from Purgatory. 



Picture Gallery 161 



15 (84200). Lombard School, XVI. cent. Madonna and Child enthro- 
ned between two angels under a baldachino. (W.; h. 1,66, 1. 1,74). The 
infant Christ gives a key to St. Peter who, with another saint, is stan- 
ding beside him. 

16. Unknown, XV. cent. St. John the Evangelist seated with the 
eagle beside him. (W.; h. 1,02, 1. 0,57). He holds the gospel in one 
hand and a pen in the other. Painted on a gold ground. 

17 (83787). Giovanni Petrini or Gian Pietro Rizzi, called GIAMPIK- 
TRINO (worked in Milan in the (first half of the XVI. cent.). Madonna 
and Child. (W.; h. 0,54, 1. 0,41). In the centre is the Madonna with the 
Child in her lap. St. John the baptist with his cross and the lamb 
beside him is on one side, on the other is St. Jerome extracting a thorn 
from the lion's paw., 

18 (83872). Copy of a Lionardo in the Louvre. St. John the baptist, 
holding a cross in his left hand, points with his right to the words 
Ecce Agnus Dei inscribed above. (W.; h. 0,57, 1. 0,41). 

19. School of Lionardo, XVI. cent. The Same. (W.; h. 0,64, 1. 0,47). 

20 (83878). Cesare da Sesto (* Sesto 1477, f Milan 1523). The three 
wise men out of the east. (W.; h. 3,26, 1. 2,70). Jesus, seated on His 
mother's lap receives gifts from the kings who arrive with countless 
followers. There are rocks in the background and some very fine ruins. 

91 (83998). Bernardino Luini (* Luino circa 1470, f Milan ? circa 
1531). Madonna and Child. (W.; h. 0,83, 1. 0,66). A lily on the right in 
the background. 

22 (83879). School of Lionardo (XVI. cent.). Christ and the little St . 
fohn. (W.; h. 0,56, 1. 0,65). The two children, nude on a couch, are 
seen embracing. The holy Spirit broods over them. 

23 (83876). Lombard School, XVI. cent. Virgin and Child. (W.; h. 
0,60, 1. 0,77). The Virgin lays her hands on the shoulders of two devout 
worshippers who kneel at her feet ; the infant Christ holding a flower, 
is on her lap. 

24 (83847). School of Lodi, XVI. cent. Madonna and Child with 
Saints. (W.; h. 0,62, 1. 050). The Madonna and Child seated under a 
leafy tree. On either side stand St. Ambrose and St. Jerome with his lion. 

25 (84165). Francesco Zaganelli, called IL COTIGNOLA (* 1470 (?), 
t Ravenna 1531). The bethrothal of the Virgin. (W.; h. 1,59, 1. 1,37). 
An old priest stands in the centre blessing the espoused couple. At the 
feet of the Virgin Mary is the symbolic dove. On the left is S. Augu- 
stine, on the right a virgin martyr. 

26 (84081). Lombard School, XV. cent. The Entombment. (W.; h. 
0,32, 1. 1,16). The dead Christ is carried in a winding sheet to the 
grave escorted by Magdalene and Mary. On the right the Madonna, 
fainting, is supported by St. John and a third Mary. 

27 (84084). Lombard School, XV. cent. Christ disputing with the 
Doctors. (W.; h. 0,30, 1. 0,50). In the midst of an attentive crowd 
Christ holds argument with the excited scribes. 

28 (84078). Lombard School, XV. cent. The Baptism of Christ. 
(W.; h. 0,31, 1. 0,50). The Baptist pours water from a shell onto the 
head of Christ who stands before him with folded hands. 

29 (83940). School of Modena, XV. cent. The dead Christ, crowned 
with thorns, upright in His coffin. (W.; h. 1,08, 1. 1,13). Behind him are 
the instruments of His passion. The background is a rocky landscape. 



1 62 First Floor 

30 (84166). Giovanni Antonio Bazzi, called IL SODOMA (* Vercelli 
about 1477, f Siena 1549). The Resurrection. (W.; h. 2,62, 1. 1,67). 
Christ on high surrounded by angels bears the sign of victory over 
death in his left hand. Below at the empty sepulchre are the guards ; 
some asleep, others amazed at the miracle, and two angels. In the 
distance the holy women are seen approaching. Signed : Jo ANT. 
ACQUES VE. AUCT. F. A. 1534. 

31 (83994). Pielro Vanned, called IL PERUGINO (?). (Citta delle Pieve 
1446, f Castello Fontignano, 1523). Madonna and Child. (W.; h. 0,94, 
1. 0,64). Landscape, background with trees and rocks. The three wise 
men in the distance. 

32 (84021). School of Penigino (XV. -XVI. cent.). God the Father. 
(W.; h. 1,10, 1. 0,75). 

33 (84017). Bernardino Di Betlo, called IL PINTURICCHIO (* Perugia 
1454, t Siena 1513). The Assumption. (W.; h. 2,78, 1. 1,63). The Virgin 
on high surrounded by music making angels. Below her are the apost- 
les gazing up to heaven. The landscape in the background is dotted 
here and there with buildings. (Fig. 132). 

In front of the window on the right : 

34. Base of a Candelabra with 5 figures (the 6.th is missing) in 
high relief. Roman work, reminiscent of Archaic greek originals. 

In front of the other window : 

35. Statue of the Madonna with the Christ child on her lap. French 
work, early XIV. cent. 

Centre of the wall : 

36 (10828). Marble statue of a sleeping satyr. Reclining on a'wine skin; 
beside him are a dog and a goat. Figure for a fountain, XV. cent. 

VII. School of Bologna. 

1 (84146). Giovanni Lanfranco, (* Parma 1580, t Rome 1647). Christ 
in the desert seated amidst a host of angels. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 1,27). 

2 (84101). Lionello Spada (* Bologna 1576, f Parma 1622). Cain bru- 
tally attacking his prostrate brother Abel. (C.; h. 1,62, 1. 1,21). 

3. School of Bologna, XVII. cent. St. Peter repentant. (C.; h. 1,04, 
1. 1,38). 

4 (84098). Giovanni Lanfranco. The fettering of Satan. (C. ; h. 2,06, 
1. 1,47). Satan in shackles lies on the ground, an angel is in the act of 
attaching his chain to an iron ring. 

5 (83892). Giulio Cesare Amidano (* Parma about 1550, f Parma about 
1630). Holy Family. (C.; h. 1,30, 1. 0,91). The Child on the Virgin's lap. 
St. Joseph behind them, reading a book. 

6 (84147). School of the Caracci (XVII. cent.). Bacchus holding a 
wine cup in his raised right hand. (C.; h. 1,60, 1. 1,02). 

7 (84150). Giov. Francesco Barbieri, called IL GUERCINO (* Cento 
1591, f Bologna 1666). St. John the Evangelist. (C.; h. 0,59, 1. 0,48). 

8 (84139). Lionello Spada (* Bologna 1576, t Parma 1622). The scourg- 
ing of Jesus. (C.; h. 0,53, 1. 0,46). He stands between the servants who 
are scourging Him. One of them bends the ground to bind together a rod. 

9 (84043). Annibale Carracci (* Bologna 1560, ) Rome 1609). Bacchante. 
(C.; h. 1,32, 1. 1,72). A Satyr approaches with a cup filled with grapes 
and seeks to disrobe a Bacchante. 



Picture Gallery 



163 




Fig. 132. Assumption, rom Pinturicchio (Phot. Brogi). 



164 First Floor 

10 (84227). Antonio Rimpatta (from Bologna). The Virgin and Child, 
under a Baldachino. (W.; h. 3,81, 1. 2,80). On their left St. Paul and 
St. Gregory, on their right St. Peter and St. Sebastian (1509-1511). 

11 (84152). Guido Reni (* Calvenzano 1575, f Bologna 1642).^. Mat- 
thew the Evangelist busy writing. A Study. 1C.; h. 0,66, 1. 0,55). 

12 (84120). Agostino Caracci (* Bologna 1557, f Parma 1602). Holy 
Family. (C.; h. 0,47, 1. 0,35). The Virgin has the Child on her lap. He is 
embracing the little St. John. Beside them stand Joseph and St. Margaret. 

13 (83848). Giulio Cesare Amidano. St. Lorenzo. (C.; h. 1,30, 1. 0,90). 
The saint falls onto his knees whilst an angel on the left appears hold- 
ing the instruments of his martyrdom. 

14 (84158). Domenico Maria Aluratori (* Bologna 1662, t 1749)- The 
martyrdom of the apostles Philip and James. (C.; h. 1,73, 1. 0,96). 

15 (84088). Giov. Francesco Barbieri, called n. GUERCINO. St. Wil- 
liam of Aquitania. (Sketch). (C.; h. 0,60, 1, 0,35). The Saint receives 
monastic garb from a bishop. On clouds above appear the Madonna 
and Child. 

16 (83899). Agostino Caracci. Portrait of Orazio Bassani, called 
della Viola. (C.; h. 0,93, 1. 0,65). 

17 (84102). School of the Caracci, XVII. cent. An Angel. (C.; h. 0,82, 
1. 0,78). 

18 (84142). Jacopo Cavedone (* Sassudo 1577, t Bologna 1660). Hymen 
bringing garlands for a youthful bride and bridegroom. (C.; h. 1,14, 1. 1,54). 

19 (84161). Pier Francesco Mola (* Milan 1612, f Rome 1666. The 
Vision of St. Romuald. (C.; h. 2,25, 1. 1,52). He sees in the clouds the 
four Fathers of the Church. On the left appears the mystical ladder. 

20 (83996). Giovanni Lanfranco. The Madonna as Saviour. (C.; h. 
2,78, 1. 1,85). The Devil seeks in vain to hold fast a human soul which 
is drawn up into the clouds by the Madonna. 

21 (83981). Giov. Francesco Barbieri, called IL GUERCINO The re- 
pentant Magdalen, gazing with tearfilled eyes at the crown of thorns. 
(C.; h. 1,15, 1. 1,00). 

22 (83862). Bartolomeo Schedoni (* Modena 1570, f Parma 1615). 
Portrait of a cobbler. (C.; h. 0,72, 1. 0,65). 

23 (83841). The same. Cupid resting, with outspread wings, indicating 
his instant readiness for flight. (C ; h. 0,91, 1. 0,77). 

24 (81013). Domenico Zampieri, called IL DOMENICHINO (* Bologna 
1581, f Naples 1641). The Guardian Angel. (C.; h. 2,47, 1. 2,07). Signed: 
DoM.'ZAMPERius BENON K. A. MDCXV. 

25 (83859). Bartolomeo Schedoni. The Holy Family floating in the clouds 
surrounded by angels. (C.; h. 3,04, 1. 1,91). Below standing from right to 
left are St. Francis, St. Laurence, St. Jerome and St. John the Baptist. 

26 (84133). Giov. Francesco Barbierl, called H. GUKRCINO. St. Peter 
repentant holds the keys in one hand and wipes away his tears with 
the other. (C.;.h. 1,22, 1. 1,02). 

27 (83865). Bartolomeo Schedoni. St. John the Baptist points to an 
angel who holds a scroll. (C.; h. 0,73, 1, 0,63). 

28 (84125). Ludovlco Caracci (* Bologna 1555, t 1619)- The Burial 
of Christ (C ; h. 0,84, 1. 0,69). 

29 (84149). Giovanni Lanfranco. St. Francis and another in adora- 
tion before Christ. (C.; h. 2,70, 1. 2,24). 



Picture Gallery 



165 



30 (83824). Gio. Benedetto Castiglione , called IL GRECHKTTO , 
(* Genoa 1617, t Mantua 1670). Madonna and Child. (C.; h. 1,08, 1. 1,38). 
He is helping Himself from a dish of fruit ; on the right is a vase of 
flowers and a little dog. 

31 (84097). School of Domenichino (XVII. cent.). St. John the E- 
vangelist pausing from his writing as if listening to a voice ; beside 
him the symbolic eagle. (C.; h. 1,66, 1. 1,42). 

32 (84129). Annibale Carracci. Satirical portrait of Michelangelo da 
Caravaggio. (C.; h. 1,02, 1. 1,33). The representative of the eclectics 
thus mocks the head of the Naturalistic school of painting, portraying 
him as a savage in company with a dwarf and surrounded by animals. 




Fig. '33 Alalanta and Hippomenes, from Guido Reni (Phot. Brogi). 

33 (84155). Artemisia Gentileschi (* Pisa 1590, -f- London 1642). Judith 
decapitating Halo/ernes. (C.; h. 1,66, 1. 1,26). 

34 (83895). Bartolomeo Scliedoni. The Massacre of the Innocents. 
(C.; h. 1,82, 1. 1,35). To the left is the Captain imparting his terrible 
order to the women. 

35 (83900). Sisto Rosa, called SISTO BALDALOCCHIO (* Parma 1555 , 
t Bologna 1647). St Cecilia playing the organ, beside her is an angel 
with a violoncello. (C.; h. 1,90, 1. 1,22). 

36 (84030). Guido Reni. Atalanta and Hippomenes. (C.; h. 1,94 1. 
2,63). The maiden stoops to pick up the apple which Hippomenes has 
let fall during the race. This is one of the Master's best pictures. 
(Fig. 13*). 

37 (84122). Annibale Caracci. Hercules at the Cross-roads. (C.; h. 
1,67, 1. 2,37). Virtue and Vice each seeking to persuade the hero. 



166 First Floor 

38 (84130). Guido Reni. Vanity offers Modesty a bowl full of jewels. 
(C.; h. 2,94, 1. 2,11). Modesty gazes at a pearl and then returns it. 

39 (84096). Bartolomeo Schedoni. Herminia, fully armed, holding a 
helmet in her right hand, appears amongst the shepherds, who look 
upon her with amazement. (C.; h. 1,48, 1. 2,07). 

40 (84095). Guido Reni (?). Ulysses accepting garments from Nau- 
sicaa. (C.; h. 2,17, 1. 2,70). 

41 (84141). Annibale Caracci. Rinaldo and Armida. (C.; h. 1,68, 
1. 2,36). Rinaldo, in the arms of his beloved, shows her a mirror. In the 
background is a landscape with buildings and warriors amongst the trees. 

42 (83836). Bartolomeo Schedoni. Christian Charity. (C.; h. 1,82, 
1. 1,25). A woman handing a piece of a bread to a beggar who is lead- 
ing a blind man. 

43 (83985). The same. Three women binding up the wounds of 
St. Sebastian, who lies on a table. (C.; h. 1,88, 1. 1,36). 

44 (84105). Ercole Gennari (* Cento 1597, f Bologna 1658). Rinaldo 
and Armida. (C.; h. 1,09, 1. 1,42). She seeks to free herself from her 
lover's passionate embraces. 

45 (84103). School of Domenichino (XVII. cent.). The flight into 
Egypt. (C.; h. 2,23, I. 1,47). Joseph in the centre between two angels, 
one of whom shows him the way, while another leads the ass on which 
the Virgin and Child are seated. 

46 (84159). Bartolomeo Schedoni. St. Eustace kneels before the cross 
which appears between the stag's antlers. (C.; h. 0,86, 1. 1,17). 

47 (84091). Orazio Riminaldi (* Pisa 1598, t 1630). St. John the 
Baptist. (C.; h. 1,71, 1. 1,31). 

48 (84003). Giovanni Lanfranco. The Virgin appears in the clouds 
surrounded by angels and cherubim. Below are St. Jerome and St. Carlo 
Borromeo. (C.: h. 2,70, 1. 1,95). 

49 (83870). Bartolomeo Schedoni. St. Sebastian seated with his hands 
tied up to a pillar. (C.; h. 1,31, 1. 0,90). 

50 (83894). Annibale Caracci. Portrait of Claudia Merulo da Cor- 
reggio. (C.; h. 0,93, 1. 0,67). He turns his head towards the spectator 
and is making an entry in a notebook. 

51 (84145). Alessandro Varotari, called IL PADOVANINO (* Padua 1590, 
t Venice 1650). Adonis and Venus. (C.; h. 1,61, 1. 1,98). Adonis leaving 
the arms of the goddess to hurry forth to the chase. In the backgr> und 
is a landscape wiih dogs and birds. 

52 (84108). After Giovanni Lanfranco. Adoration of the Virgin. (C. ; 
h. 2,67, 1. 1,71). The Virgin and Child are seen amidst clouds on high; 
below are St. Barbara and St. Margaret. 

53 (84124). Glanfrancesco Romanelll (*Viterbo 1617, f Rome 1662). A 
Sibyl leaning with her right arm against a pillar, holds in her left hand an 
open book whereon is inscribed: ut non confundar. (C.; h. 1,34, 1. 0,95). 

54 (84091). School of Guido Reni (XVII. cent.). St. Cecilia playing 
on a viol. (C.; h. 1,71, 1. 1,31). 

55 (84144). Giovanni Lanfranco. Adoration of the Virgin (C.; h. 
2, So, 1. 1,77). The Virgin and Child seated on high surrounded by an- 
gels. Below are St. Domenic and St. Augustine. 

In front of the first window : 

56 (10508). Statuette of Diana riding a stag and other silver gilt 



Picture Gallery 167 

figures. Clockwork concealed in the base sets them in motion. XVII. 
century. 

Between the windows : 

57 (10827). Marble statue of sleeping cupid, XVI. cent. 
In front of the second window : 

58 (15507). The so-called Farnese casket. The six oval figured glasses 
are the work of Giovanni de Bernard! da Castelbolognese (* 1496, t 1523), 
but are not from his own designs. The gold and silver ornamentation 
is reminiscent of Cellini but is really the work of the Florentine gold- 
smith Marmo di Bastiano Sbarri (1540-1547). 

On the opposite wall : 

59 (10807). Marble statue of a sleeping hermaphrodite, XVI. Cent. 
The feet are missing. 

Room VIII. Italian Schools. XVI. and XVII. cent. 

1. School of Bologna, XVII. cent. Apollo. (C.; h. 1,00, 1.. 1,15). 
Various birds are listening to the God's music. 

2 (83864). Bartolomeo Schedoni. St. Paul. (C.; h. 1,27, 1. 0,90). The 
apostle points to a book which he holds in his right hand. A heavy 
sword rests against his shoulder. 

3 (83907). Venetian School, XVI. cent. The Madonna holds the 
Child in her arms ; an outspread veil covers her head. Angels above 
and below. (C.; h. 1,47, 1. 1,20). 

4 (83937). Copy of Paolo Veronese. Christ and the Centurion. (C.; 
h. 1,05, 1. 1,48). The Centurion, accompanied by two soldiers, throws 
himself at the feet of Christ, behind whom are seen His disciples. 

5 (83887). School of Francesco Mazzola, called IL PARMIGIANO. 
Minerva holding a spear and shield. (C.; h. 1,87, 1. 1,06). On the ground 
are books and an escutcheon with daggers. 

6. Polidoro Caldara, called POLIDORO DA CARAVAGGIO. The Pente- 
cost. (SI.; h. 0,71, 1. 0,57). The Virgin seated amongst the apostles ; the 
Holy Spirit broods over her. 

7 (8411b). School of the Caracci (XVII. cent.). St. Koch, gazing 
heavenward with his hands crossed on his breast. (C.; h. 0,73, 1. 0,61). 

8 (83984). Annibale Caracci. Pieta. (C.; h. 1,58, 1. 1,50). The Madonna 
has the head of the dead Christ on her lap and weeps bitterly. At her 
feet are two angels, one touching the crown of thorns. (Fig. 134). 

9 (84201). Bolognese School, XVII. cent. Christ's entry into Jeru- 
salem. (C.; h. 3,23, 1. 2,17). 

10 (83780). Polidoro Caldara, called POLIDORO DA CARAVAGGIO. The 
Procession to Golgotha. (SI.; h. 0,73, 1. 0,55). Christ having fallen on 
his knees is brutally beaten by a Jew. The kneeling figure on the left is 
probably St. Veronica; on the right are the Madonna and two Marys. 

11 (84094). Guido Reni. St. John the Evangelist, writing. (C.; h. 
0,70, 1. 0,55). 

12 (83786). Polidoro Caldara, called DA CARAVAGGIO. Adoration of 
the Shepherds. (SI.; h. 0,73, 1. 0,54. The Virgin unwraps the swaddling 
clothes and shows the infant Christ to the Shepherds. God the Father 
appears on high surrounded by angelic minstrels. 

13 (83909). Copy from Sebastlano del Piombo. Portrait of Giulia Gon- 



168 First Floor 

zaga (?). C.; h. 0,52, 1. 0,38). She turns towards the spectator, and 
points to a sharp slit over her breast. 

14 (84068). Alessandro Vasari, called IL BRONZING (* Florence 1535, 
t 1607). Bacchante and Cupid. (C.; h. 1,34, 1. i,95). 

15 (84214). Giorgio Vasari (Florentine and Roman School). Justice 
raises Innocence and punishes Slander. (W. h. 3,53, 1. 2,52). Innocence 
brings the Goddess two doves. The human slanderers lie on the ground 
in chains. 




Fig. 134. Pieta, from Caracci (Phot. Brogi). 

16 (84025). Francesco Albani ( * Bologna 1578 , f l66 ) Tran- 
sformation of St. Rosa of Viterbo. ( C.; h. 0,69, 1. 0,54). The Saint 
with flowers in her lap is drawn up to Heaven by angels. Below is a 
church in which mass is being celebrated; on the right the saint's mar- 
tyrdom is depicted. 

17 (84092). Sofonisba Anguissola (* Cremona about 1528 , t Genoa 
1626). Portrait of herself. (C.; h. 0,78, I. i.ai). The artist is playing 
an organ facing the spectator. 



Picture Gallery 169 



18 (83785). Roman School, XVII. cent. The visitation. (C.; h. 0,78, 
1. 1,21). 

19 (84202). Roman School, XVII. cent. Holy Family. (C.; h. 1,11, 
1. 0,81). 

20 (83875). School of Parma, XVII. cent. An Angel. (C.; h. 1,00, 
1. 1,00). 

21 (84033). Luca Cambiaso (* Moneglia 1527, f Madrid 1585). Endy- 
mion and Diana. (C.; h. 1,59, I. 1,17). The goddess seeks to hold back 
the beloved youth who attempts to free himself from her embrace. 
Cupid and a hound are close at hand. 

22 (84109). School of Carracci, XVII. cent. Pieta. (C.; h. 0,76, 1. 0,92). 
The Madonna with folded hands bends over the dead body of her Son. 

23 (83905). Venetian School, XVII. cent. Jupiter seated at a feast 
with the other gods. (C.; round, diam. 1,38). Venus and Mars are be- 
side him. Winged genii hand flowers and wait upon them. 

24 (83861). Matthaus Stonier. The miracle of the Loaves and Fishes 
(C.; h. 1,53, ! 2 >5)- Christ blessing the bread. 

25 (83822). Bernardo Strozzi, called IL PRETE GENOVESE (* Genoa 
1581, f Venice 1644). Portrait of a Capucin monk laying his hand on a 
skull. (C.; h. 0,95, I- 0,67). 

26 (83812). School of Carlo Marassa (XVII. cent.). Holy Family. 
(C.; h. 0,93, ! 0,73). 

27 (83789). Andrea Piccinelli, called ANDREA DEL BRESCIANINO (from 
Brescia, wdrked from 1507 to 1525). Holy Family. (W.; round, d. 0,73). 

28 (81055). School of Guido Reni (XVII. cent.). The four seasons. 
(C.; h. 1,70, 1. 2,28). A boy with ears of corn stands beside a nude fi- 
gure representing Summer. Spring with a garland of flowers. Autumn 
with a red cloak and grapes is easily recognisable. Winter is depicted 
as an old woman wrapped in a mantle. 

29 (81040). Bernardino Licino , called IL PORDENONE (* Pordenone 
1490, f 1556-1561). The Virgin stands, under a Corinthian portico, gazing 
up to heaven, where a cloud of angels are visible. Below her are the 
four Doctors of the Roman Church, engaged in wordy warfare. (W.; h. 
2,93, 1. i,9^). 

30 (83826). Genoese School, XVII. cent. Madonna and Child. (C.; 
h. 0.93, 1. 0,73). He holds a cherry twig in His hand. The sea is in the 
background. 

81. School of Bartolomeo Schedoni, XVII. cent. St. Jerome. (C.; 
h. 0,90, 1. 0,70). The Saint interrupts his reading as an angel with a 
trumpet announces the advent of the Day of Judgement. 

32. Giuseppe Cesar!, called IL CAVALIERS D'ARPINO (* Arpino about 
i56o, f Home 1640). Jesus with two Jews. (C.; round, d. 0,75). 

33 (83858). Matthaus Stomer. Holy Family. (C. h. 1,55, 1. 2,08). The 
source of illumination is a light hidden behind a basket. 

34 (84029). Luca Cambiaso. Venus and Adonis. (C.; h. 1,60, 1. 1,16). 
The goddess, weeping, embraces Adonis, who .has been wounded in the 
chase. Cupid stands on the right. 

86(84093). School of Guido Reni (XVII. cent.). The infant Jesus. 
(C. ; h. 0,68, 1. 0,88). Near the sleeping Child the emblems of His pas- 
sion are portrayed. 

36 (83903). Venetian School (XVII. cent.). Jupiter and other gods. 



170 First Floor 

(C.; round, diatn. 1,38). Jupiter poised with one foot on the earthly 
sphere issues an edict ; on his right Diana and olher gods, on his left 
Venus and Mars with Cupid. Neptune below. 

37 (83772). Battista Salvi , called IL SASSOFKRRATO (* Sassoferrato 
1605, f Rome 1685). St. Joseph and his household. (C.; h. 0,97, 1. 1,33). 

38 (84119). Annibale Caracci. Holy Family. (C. ; h. 0,99, 1. 0,78). 
St. John kisses Christ's hand. 

39 (84113). The Same. Study in perspective. (C.; h. 1,07, 1. 0,94). 

40 (83823). Matthaus Stonier. The Release of St. Peter from prison. 
(C.; h. 1,27, 1. 1,82). He is seated; an angel seizes his cloak as if to 
urge him to arise and go forth. 

41 (83790). Battista Salvi, called IL SASSOFERRATO. Madonna and 
Child. (C.; h. 1,37, 1. 1,00). On high are three angels bearing a scroll 
inscribed : Gloria in excelsis Deo et in terra pax. The Madonna and 
shepherds are worshipping the Child. 

42. School of Schedoni (XVII. cent.). St. Cecilia seated at an organ. 
(C.; h. 2,60, 1. 1,85). An angel is working the bellows and others stand 
in the background. 

43 (84067). Venetian School (XVI. cent.). Venus and the Graces. 
(C.; h. 1,44, ' 2 . 2 4). Venus has taken Cupid's bow away from him and 
is scolding him. The Graces are seated on the left. 

44 (83769). Carlo Maratta (* Camerano in the district of Ancona 
1625, f Rome 1713). Adoration of the Magi. (C.; h. 1,98, 1. 1,33). The 
Virgin with the Child in her arms receives their gifts. 

45 (83777). Gian Francesco Penni, called IL FATTORE. Salome, show- 
ing the head of the Baptist to her maid. (W.; h. 0,62, 1. 0,47). 

46 (83866). Annibale Caracci. Corpus Christi. (C. ; h. 0,66, 1. 1,36). 
The dead body lies on a sheet ; the arms are crossed and the head 
bowed to one side. 

47 (83934). Domenico Theotocopuli, called IL GRECO (* Crete circa 
1548, t Toledo 1614). Boy with a fire brand which he tries to blow into 
a flame in order to light a candle with it. (C.; h. 0,59, 1. 0,49). 

48 (84177). Marco del Pino, called MARCO DA SIENA (* Siena circa 
1525?, f Naples 1588). The Circumcision of Chi ist performed in the 
presence of the high priest and many witnesses. The Madonna stands 
on the left. (W.; h. 4,84,' 1. 3,32). Signed: MARCUS DEL PINO SENENSIS 

FACIEBAT 1573. 

49 (83953). Andrea Meldolla, called SCHIAVONE (* Sebenico 1522 ?, 
t Venice 1563). Venetian School, fesus before Herod. (C.; h. 1,34, 1. 2,04). 
The imperial viceroy is seated on the left holding a sceptre. Jesus 
stands bound between guards and is ordered to defend Himself by one 
of the elders accusing Him. 

50 (84143). Manner of Giovanni Lanfranco. Two martyrs worshipping 
the Virgin and Child who are visible amidst the clouds surrounded by 
angels. (C.; h. 2,28, 1. 1,48). 

51 (83961)). Venetian School (XVI. cent.). The Madonna holds in 
her arms the infant Christ who is bestowing benediction. Two angels 
hold a crown over her head. (C.; h. 1,33, 1. 0,97). 

52. Roman School, XVI. cent. The Virgin and St. Elizabeth. (C.; h. 
2,50, I. i,qo). On the right are the two women embracing. A cripple sits 
at their feet; to the left are several people gesticulating, with a kneeling 
boy in their midst. There are classical buildings in the background. 



Picture Gallery 171 



53 (83828). Matthaus Stomer. Adoration of the Christ child. (C.; h. 
1,27, 1. 1,78). The light which illumines the spectators emanates from 
the central figure of the infant Christ. The Madonna and shepherds 
gaze at Him devoutly. 

64 (83942). Copy from Paolo Veronese. The Finding of Moses. (C.; 
h. i ,06, 1. 1,60). A maid brings the little boy to the Princess who stands 
amongst her ladies. A dwarf with dogs and two spearmen are also of 
the company. 

55 (84148). Jacopo Palma , called THE YOUNGER (* Venice 1544 , 
t Venice 1628). Burial of St. Sebastian. (C.; h. 1,76, 1. 1,25). The saint 
is laid in his coffin by an old man and a woman ; other women gaze 
upon him, a youth in red draws attention to the scene. 

56 (83935). Jacopo Robust!, called TINTORKTTO (* Venice 1518, \ 
Venice I.S94). Madonna and Child. (C.; h. 0,95, 1. 1,10). She is seated 
on the crescent moon and holds a book in her hand. They are surroun- 
ded by cherubs. 

57. Bartolomeo Schedoni. St. Peter, leaning upon a pillar on which 
is a bunch of keys. (C.; h. 1,28, 1. 0,88). On his left knee he holds a 
book; at his feet are the insignia of the papacy, the triple tiara etc. 

58 (83966). Venetian School, XVI. cent. Two Saints. (C. ; h. 1,49, 
1. 1,26). On the left St. John the baptist with his lamb ; on the right 
St. Jerome reading out of a book which a youth holds Defore him. Beside 
him is his lion. 

59 (83833). Matthaus Stomer (worked in Messina in the second half 
of the XVII. cent. Christ bound by the Jews. (C.; h. 1,53, 1. 2,09). One 
secures His hands, another mocks Him and a third thrusts a lighted 
torch at Him. 

60 (83924). Copy from Titian. Portrait of Charles V., wearing the in- 
signia of the Golden Fleece. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 0,78). He turns towards the 
spectator and has a paper in his left hand. 

61 (83917). Venetian School, XVI. cent. Portrait of a prince seated 
at a table on which a crown is placed (W.; h. 0,80, 1. 0,61). He turns to 
the left, with his left hand on his breast and his right clasping the hilt 
of his dagger. 

62 (83910). School of Sebastlano del Piombo , XVI. cent. Unidenti- 
fied Portrait of a youth in black, facing the spectator (unfinished). (SI.; 
h. 0,54, 1. 0,39). 

63 (84069). Domenico Robust!, son of Tintoretto (* Venice 1562, f 
1597). Danae reclining at the foot of a tree, watched by Cupid receives 

the golden rain. (C.; h. 1,16, 1. 1,46). 

64 (83986). Jacopo da Ponte, called JACOPO BASSANO (* Bassano 1510, 
t Venice 1592). The Raising of Lazarus. (C. ; h. 2,79, 1. 2,20). Jesus 
who has come with a large following blesses Lazarus who rises and is 
helped to cast off his grave clothes. In the background is a city wall. 
The sketch for this picture is N. I in the Titian room. 

65 (83930). Francesco Torbldo, called IL MORO DI VERONA (* Verona 
1503, f 1581). Portrait of an old man leaning with his right arm 
against a pillar. (C.; h. 1,10, 1. 0,90). He wears a ring and holds a 
letter in his hand. Signed : FRANC. s TURBIDUS DITTO EL MORO V. 
FACIEBAT. 

66 (83928). Tiberio Tinelli, Venetian school (* Venice 1586, f 1638). 
Unidentified portrait of a man in a black fur edged coat. (C.; h. 0,77, 
1. 0,62). 



172 



First Floor 



67 (83927). Venetian school, XVI. cent. Head of a warrior turned 
to the right with his gaze fixed upon the spectator. (C.; h. 0,42, 1. 0,38). 

68 (83842). Matthaus Sterner. Jesus at Emmaus. (C.; h. 1,57, 1. 2,02). 
The two disciples recognise Him in the breaking of bread. His face is 
strongly illumined. 

At the first window : 

69 (10785). Bronze statuette of Hercules with the calydonian boar. 
XVI. cent. School of Giambologna. 

At the second 
window : 

70 (10520). Bron- 
ze statuette of Her- 
cules strangling the 
serpents, other of the 
hero's feats are de- 
picted in relief round 
the base. XVI. cent. 
Formerly considered 
antique (Fig. 135). 

At the third win- 
dow: 

71 (10782). Bron- 
ze statuette of Mer- 
cury running (a re- 
plica of the larger 
bronze at Florence) 
by Giovanni Fiam- 
mingo called Giam- 
bologna (* Douai 
1524, t 1608) finished 
later than 1564. 

Room IX. 
Pannini. 

(Canaletto's views 
deserve especial at- 
tention because they 
depict architectural 
features of Venice as 
they originally were, 
now that they have 
lost so much by al- 
teration and inaccurate restoration, as for instance the Abbey of S. Gre- 
gorio and the Fondaco dei Turchi, which latter has been entirely chan- 
ged by recent transformation and is now the Museo Civico). 

1 (&3911). Antonio da Canale, called CANAI.KTTO (* Venice 1697, t 
1768). The Church of S. Giovanni e Paolo. (C.; h 0,61, 1. 0,97). 

2 (83947). The Same. The Grand Canal, Venice. (C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,98). 

3 (83962). The Same. Torre dei I.eoni, I'enice. (C.; h. 0,60, l..o,98). 

4 (83951). The Same. Fondaco dei Turchi, I'enice. (C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,98). 




Fig. 135. Hercules strangling the serpents. 



Picture Gallery 



173 



5 (83923). The Same. The Grand Canal, Venice, with Palazzi Balbi 
and Foscari. (C.; h. 0,60, 1. 0,97). 

6 (83945). The Same. The Doge's Palace, Venice. (C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,98). 

7 (83816). Giovanni Paolo Pannini (* Piacenza 1692 ?, f Rome 1768). 
Charles III. visiting Pope Benedict XIV. at the Vatican. (C.; h. 1,23, 
1. 1,72). The young monarch, clad ii>red, arrives with a large following. 
The Pope awaits him, seated in an inner chamber. This picture is of 
great value to students of the costumes and customs of that period. 

8 (837651. The Same. R,nnan Ruins. (C.; h. 1,22, 1. 0,92). 

9 (83814). Anton Raphael Mengs (* Aussig 1728, t Rome 1779). Fer- 
dinand IV. of Bourbon, at the age of twelve. (C.; h. 1,80, 1. 1,26). This 
youthful sovereign wears a golden cuirass and holds a scej-lie. On the 
table and sofa beside him aie the insignia of royalty. 




I ig. 136. The Palace of the Doges and the Piazzetta, from Canaletto. 

10 (837641. Giovanni Paolo Pannini. The Cnlosseum and the Arch 
of Com tan tine. (C.; h. 0,98, 1. 1,34). 

11 (83810). The Same. Charles III. on horseback with his followeis 
in front of St. Peters. (C.; h. 1,23, 1. 1,72!. The huge open space is 
filled with riders who are accompanying the king to the basilica. This 
picture is remarkable for its bright and harmonious colouring. 

12 (83773). The Same. Roman Ruins together with the socalled 
Temple of the Sibyl at Tivoli. (C.; h. 1,20, 1. 0,91). 

13 (83925). Antonio da Canale, called CANAI.ETTO. The Church of 
the Salute. Venice. (C.; 0,61, 1. 0,87). 

14 (83914). The Same. The Grand Canal, Venice, and the Church of 
S. Maria degli Scalzi. (C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,97). 

15 (83818V Anton Raphael Mengs. Portrait of a young: prince in 
regal atlire wiih his left hand on his hip. (C.; h. 0,81, 1. 0,65). 

16. Giacinto Diana, called IL POZ/.OLANO (* Po/zuoli 1730, f Naples 



174 First Floor 

circa 1800). Diana. (C.; h. 0,80, 1. 1,00). The Goddess seated to the 
right surrounded by Cupids is holding a peacock. On the left another 
little Cupid is dragging up a garland. 

17 (83955). Antonio da Canale, called CANALETTO. The Dogana, Ve- 
nice. (C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,98). 

18 (83959). The Same. The Palace of the Doges and the Piazetta. 
(C.; h. 0,60, 1. 0,98). (Fig. 136). 

19 (84047). Giacinto Rigaud (* Perpignan 1659, f Paris 1743). Portrait 
of a cardinal holding his cap in his right hand. (C.; h. 0,85, 1. 0,68. 

20 (83918). Antonio da Canale, called CANALETTO. Bridge over the 
Rialto. (C.; h. 0,60, 1. 0,97). 

21 (83929). The Same. Badia of S. Gregorio. (C.; h. 0,60, 1. 0,98). 
22. Giacinto Diana, called IL POZZOLANO. Diana. (C.; h. 0,80, 1. 1,00). 

The goddess is seated on a rock to the left and lets Cupids arm her 
for the chase. 

At the window : 

23 (10524). The Rape of the Sabines. Bronze group by Giovanni 
Fiamniingo called Giambologna. This work is dated 1579 and is therefore 
three years earlier than the larger replica by the same artist in the 
Loggia dei Lanzi at Florence. 

Room X. (Prince Farnese). 

1 (84131). Giuseppe Maria Crespi, called LO SPAGNOLO (* Bologna 
1665, f I447)- Holy J-amt'fy and Saints. (C.; h. 0,37, 1. 0,34). The Child 
seated on the Virgin's lap is reading a scroll she holds. St. John, St. 
Joseph, St. Anna and other saints are with them. 

2 (84026). Bolognese School, XVII. cent. St. Francis wearing his 
hood is portrayed in a devout ecstasy. (C.; h. 0,40, 0,54). 

3 (84127). Simone (Jantarini, called SIMONE DA PESARO (* Tropezza 
near Pesaro 1612, f Verona 1648).. The Madonna and SI. Carlo Borromeo 
blessed by the infant Jesus. Above are angels. (SI.; h. 0,33, 1. 0,25). 

4 (116068). Francesco Solimena, called L'ABBATE Ciccio. St. Roch 
gazing up to heaven ; beside him a dog. (C.; h. 1,27, 1. 0,93). 

5 (84563). Franz Denis (t Mantua 1670). Portrait of Rawiccio II. 
Farnese standing with his right hand on a dog's head. (C.; h. 1,28, 1. 1,04). 

6. Pier Ilario Spolverinl (* Parma 1657, -f- 1734). Equestrian portrait 
of Antonio Farnese, last duke of Parma. (C.; h. 3,05, 1. 2,00). 

7 (84579,. Franz Denis. Portrait of Isabella d'Esle, second wife of 
Ramiccio II. Farnese. (C.; h. 1,26, 1. 1,03). 

8. (84060). Neapolitan School, XVII cent. A market 6y the seashore 
with architectural buildings in the background. (C.; h. 0,48, 1. 0,64). 

9 (SH.83). Copy from Andrea del Sarto. Madonna with angels. (C ; h. 
1,15, 1. 1,86). 

10. After Salvator Rosa, XVII. cent. Landscape with rocks and 
shrubs. (C.; h. 0,65, 1. 0,95). 

11. Neapolitan School, XVIlI.cent. Thi-ee Cupids of whom one holds 
a mirror for the other on the left. (C.; h. 0,78, I. 0,96). 

12 (84552). Netherland School, XVI. cent. A group of portraits of 
the Farnese family from Paul III. to the Princesses of Portugal. (W.; 
h. 0,14, 1. 0,11). 



Picture Gallery 175 



13 (83882). School of Parma, XVI. cent. Madonna and Child with 
St. Jerome and St. Catherine. (C.; h. 1,17, 1. 1,00). The Madonna is 
holding a pear, the infant Christ embraces his bride who kneels before 
Him. St. Jerome lays his left hand on the lion's head. 

14 (83817). Giuseppe Cesar!, called IL CAVALIERE D'ARPINO. The risen 
Christ appeals to Magdalene who kneels before Him; beside heron the 
ground is the box of precious ointment. (C.; h. 0,44, 1. 0,57). 

15 (83766). The Same. St. Michael pursuing the fleeing Satan with a 
lance. (W.; h. 0,37, 1. 0,27). 

16 (83819). The Same. Jesus and the Woman of Samaria. (C.; h. 0,45, 
' Q>57)- Jesus leans against the edge of the Well, the woman stands 
opposite with a jug and rope. 

17 (116856). School of Ferrara, XVI. cent. The Flight into Egypt. 
(C.; h. 0,76, 1. 0,62). The Virgin and Child with St. John and an angel, 
behind them sits St. Joseph under a tree, reading. 

18(111425). Copy from Paolo Veronese. The Presentation in the Temple. 
(C.; h. 0,83, 1. 0,95). The aged Simeon sits beside the altar; on the left 
St. Joseph kneels with Mary and the Child, on the right in the back- 
ground is a woman with doves. 

19. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Landscape with arthitectural 
buildings. (C.; h. 1,08, 1. 1,40). 

20. Annibale Caracci. An angel with an incense buiner. (C.; h. 0,60, 
I- 1,43). 

21 (83767). Giuseppe Cesari, called IL CAVALIERE D'ARPINO. A group 
of angels. (W.; h. 0,27, 1. 0,40). 

22 (83806). Roman School, XVII. cent. (W.; h. 0,35, 1. 0,56). Half 
length figures of apostles. 

23 (83771). Giuseppe Cesari, called IL CAVALIERE D'ARPINO. A group 
of Angels. (C.; h. 0,35 1. 0,56). 

24 (83949). Copy from Titian. Mary and Magdalene. (C.; h. 1,00, 1. 0,76). 
Jesus in the Virgin's arms reaches out for the pot of ointment offered 
Him by Magdalene ; in the background is a tent. 

25 (84115). Giovanni Lanfranco. Angels bearing the body of St. Mary 
the Egyptian up to heaven in a sheet. (C.; h. 1,11, 1. 0,78). 

26 (84511). Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. A peasant driving a mule 
before him by the seashore. (C.; h. 1,16, 1. 1,62). 

27 (83950). School of Sebastiano del Piombo, XVI. cent. Head of a 
young woman. (C.; h. 0,41, 1. 0,35). Left profile, eyes raised. 

28 (83801). Giuseppe Cesari, called IL CAVALIERE D'ARPINO. St. Bene- 
dict borne heavenwards in pontifical vestments by angels. (W.; h. 0,55 
1. 0,46). 

29 (84132). Venetian School, XVI. cent. Unidentified Portrait. (C.; 
h. 0,40, 1. 0,35). 

30 (83922). School of Parma, XVI. cent. Portrait of a lady holding 
a handkerchief and a pair of gloves. (C.; h. 1,29, 1. 1,00). 

31. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Two cherubs with the emblems of 
Justice. 

On the right hand wall : 

32 (10518). Marble bust of Ranuccio II. Farnese. After Bernini, 
XVII. cent. 

33 (10519). Ditto. School of Carrara, XVII. cent. 



176 First Floor 

To the right of the Exit : 

34 (10824). Marble Bust of Charles V., XVI. cent. 
To the left of the door : 

35 (10517). Marble Bust of Paul III. Farnese, XVI. cent., unfinished. 

Room XI. Schools of Ferrara and Parma. 

1 (83999). Lorenzo Costa (* Kerrara 1460, f Mantua 1535). Uniden- 
tified Portrait. (W.J h. 0,40, 1. 0,33). The expression denotes great 
strength of character. The eyes are so painted that they seem to follow 
the spectator wherever he goes (Fig. 137). 

2 (83782). School of Ferrara, 

XVI. cent. Madonna and Child. 
(W.; h. 0,54, I- 0,43). 

3 (83840). School of Parma, 
XVI. cent. A laughing youth. 
(L.; h. 0,33, 1- 0,45. 

4 ^84136). Ditto. Half Family 
and an unknown saint. (C.; h. 
.45. ! o,34)- The Madonna is 
seated under a tree in the cen- 
tre holding the infant Jesus with 
her left and caressing the little 
St. John with her right hand. 
St. Joseph and a Benedictine 
monk stand on either side. 

5 (83915). Giov. di Niccolo Lu 
teri, called Dosso Dossi (* Dosso 
circa 1480 t Ferrara 1542). Ma- 
donna, and Child with St. Jerome. 
(W. ; h 0,35, 1- 0,44). He holds 
an open book and has his lion 
beside him; the background is a 
pleasant landscape. 

6 (83963). Benvenuto Tisi, cal- 
Fig. 137. Unidentified Portrait, from led IL GAKOFAI.O (* Garofalo circa 

Lorenzo Costa (Phot. Alinari). 1481, t Ferrara 1559). The Cir- 

cumcision. (W. ; h. 0,39, 1. 0,51). 

The infant Christ is seated on the altar while the aged Simeon performs 
the rite. On either side are attendants and onlookers. 

7 (83851). Franc. Maria Rondini (* Parma 1490, f '549 ?) The Ma- 
donna and Child are seated in the clouds (W. ; h. 1,94, 1. 1,33). He 
hands the keys to St. Peter. In the centre is the youthful John the 
Baptist and on the right St. Catharine. 

8 (84009). Giovanni Benvenuti, called L' ORTOLANO (* Ferrara 
1467, f J.szg)- The Descent from the Cross (W.; h. 2,72, 1. 1,73). 
Mary holds the dead body of Christ on her lap. Joseph of Arimathia 
stands beside her with a hammer in his hand. On their right is St. John 
supporting the body ; on their left Magdalene; behind them an unknown 
saint and another Mary weeping. Further back still is a Jew holding 
two nails of the cross. In the middle distance on the left is St. Chris- 
topher and towards the centre are some women washing. Signed : 1521. 

9 (8393*). Benvenuto Tisi. called IL GAROKALO. St. Sebastian bound 
to a pillar and wounded with four arrows. (W.; h. 0,38, 1. 0,31). 




Picture Gallery 177 



10 (83938). Battista di Niccold Luteri, called BATTISTA DEL Dosso 
(* Ferrata 1479, t 1548). The Madonna fondling the infant Jesus and 
extending her right hand in benediction on a kneeling bishop. Land- 
scape with buildings in the background. (W.; h. 0,38, 1. 0,31). 

11 (84215). School of Ferrara, XVI. cent. The Descent from the cross. 
(W.; h. 0,37, ' 0,28). Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathia wrap the 
dead body in a cloth. Between the two St. Johns Magdalene kneels beside 
the weeping Madonna. 

12 (83886). Franc. Maria Rondani. The Assumption. (W.; h. 2,14, 1. 
1,41). Angels accohipany the Virgin's upward flight; Apostles stand below; 
the landscape is alpine. 

13 (84137). School of Ferrara, XVI. cent. Madonna and Child with 
little St. fohn. (W.; h. 0,27, 1. 0,24). 

14 (83854). Ditto. Holy Family. (W.; h. 0,29, 1. 0,25). Joseph stoops 
to embrace the Child who sits on His mother's lap. 

15 (83831). School of Correggio, XVI. cent. Head of an old man. 
(C.; h. 0,30, 1. 0,21). 

16 (83855). Francesco Mazzola, called IL PARMIGIANINO (* Parma 
I 53> t Parma 1540;. A boy reading the alphabet from a slate. (W.; h. 
0,26, 1. 0,21). 

17(83881). Girol. Bedoli - Mazzola (* Bedulla near Cremona about 
1500, f 1569). Holy Family and Saints. (W.; h. 1,94, 1. 1,46). The sleeping 
Child is balanced on the edge of the manger by the Madonna who 
kneels beside Him. Behind her are St. Joseph and St. John, who holds a 
chalice. St. Francis and a Benedictine monk are in adoration on the 
left. The background is a landscape with buildings. 

18 (83863). Francesco Mazzola, called IL PARMIGIANINO (?). Madonna 
and Child with St. Catharine to whom He hands a .palm branch. (W. ; 
h. 0,66, 1. 0,51). There are buildings in the background and St. Joseph 
is seen retreating in the distance. 

19 (83869). Federico Flori, called IL BAROCCIO (Urbino 1528, t 1612). 
Madonna and Child with St. Lawrence to whom He hands a palm branch. 
(C.; h. 0,65, 1. 0,50). 

20 (83884). Girol. Bedoli-Mazzola. Portrait of a Tailor seated behind 
a table on which a piece of cloth is spread. (C.; h. 0,87, 1. 0,70). He 
holds a measure in one hand and large scissors in the other. 

21 (83877). The Same. St. Clare holding the Sacrament in one hand 
and a book in the other. (C.; h. 0,92, 1. 0,71). 

22 (84184). Filippo Mazzola (* Parma 1460 ?, t 1505). The Burial 
of Jesus. (W.; h. 1,67, 1. 1,27). The Madonna sits on the edge of the 
sarcophagus supporting the dead body on her lap. Magdalene kneels on 
the left in front of St. Catherine with the wheel and palmbranch, and 
St. Scholastica. On the right are St. Barbara with her tower and St. A- 
pollonia with the pincers. Signed : 1500. 

23 (83871). School of Bart. Schedoni, XVII. cent. The Tribute money. 
(W.; h. 0,69, 1. 0,57). Jesus is on the right saying Give unto Caesar 
the things that are Cresar's . On the left is a pharisee with the coin in 
his hand. 

24 (84020). Girol. Bedoli-Mazzola. Lucrezia plunging the sword into 
her bosom with her own right hand. (W.; h. 0,64, 1. 0,49). 

25 (83952). Benvenuto Tisi, called IL GAROFALO. Adoration of the 
Magi. (W.; h. 0,80, 1. 0,57). The three kings bearing gifts and accompa- 



178 First Floor 

nied by armed men advance towards the Virgin and Child seated in 
the centre. The background is a rocky landscape with buildings. 

26 (84199). Filippo Mazzola. Adoration of the infant Christ. (W.; 
h. 1,82, 1. 1,26). Mary kneels with folded hands before Him ; on either 
side, also kneeling, are St. Clare with the Monstrance and St. Agnes with 
her lamb. Signed: FILIPUS MAZOLLA p. p. 

27 (83874). Girol. Bedoli -Mazzola. The Annunciation. (C.; h. 2,23, 
1. 1.53). The archangel bearing a lily flies down from the presence of 
the Holy Spirit who is visible on the left, to the Virgin who kneels at 
a piie Dieu ; beside her is a work basket. A group of watching angels 
gather round the bed. 

28 (83852). Romagnolese School, XVI. cent. Holy Family with St. 
Catherine. (W.; h. 0,77, 1. 0,41). In the centre the Madonna and Child 
who bends over to embrace His bride on the left. Behind her is a 
landscape. On the right stands St. Joseph. 

Room XII. Correggio and Parmegianino. 

1 (83972). Antonio Allegri, called CORREGGIO (* Correggio 1494, f 
1534). The Betrothal of St. Catherine (W. ; h. 0,27 , 1. 0,22). The Christ 
child gazes questioningly at the Madonna before placing the ring on the 
finger of His betrothed. 

2 (83969). The Same. The socalled Zingarella. (C. ; h. 0,47, 1. 0,38). 
The Madonna and Child amongst palm trees; a white rabbit comes out 
fearlessly. An angel is visible in the sky. 

3 (83832). Francesco Mazzola, called IL PARMIGIANINO. Madonna and 
Child (C.; h. 0,84, 1. 0,66). She tries to open the Infant's mouth with 
her finger. 

4(131060). Antonio Allegri, called CORREGGIO. St. Anthony. (W. ; 
h. 0,46, 1. 0,37). 

5 (83838). Copy from Correggio. Ecce Homo. (W.; h. 0,48, 1. 0,34). 
Christ's head is crowned with thorns and bowed slightly to the right. 

6 (83873). Francesco Mazzola, called IL PARMIGIANINO. Portrait of 
Giambattista Castaldi holding a book in his left hand. (W. ; h. 0,98, 
1. 0,83). 

7. The Same. Portrait of a young man seated at a small table facing 
the spectator. (W.; h. 1,20, 1. 0,86). 

8. Michelangelo Anselmi (* Lucca 1494, t Parma 1554). Holy Family 
(W.; h. 0,44, I- o,32). 

9 (83830). Copy from Francesco Mazzola. Holy Family. (C.; h. 0,42, 1. 
0,29). Joseph watching Jesus and St. John who embrace. 

10 (83857). Girol. Bedoli-Mazzola. Alexander Farnese and a woman 
representing the City of Parma. (C.; h. 1,50, I. 1,17). The young prince 
embraces her with his left arm. She is dressed as Pallas Athene and bears 
a palm branch. The Farnese and city arms are quartered on the shield. 

11 (83837). Copy from Francesco Mazzola. The Espousals of St. 
Catherine. (C.; h. 0,67, I. 1,20). The Virgin gazes in astonishment at the 
infant Jesus who is in the act of placing the betrothal ring on St. 
Catherine's finger. St. Joseph, St. Peter and an angel are also witnesses. 

12 (83829). Michelangelo Anselmi. Holy Family. (W.; h. 0,37, 1. 0,28). 

13 (83834). School of Parma, XVI. cent. Virgin and Child with an- 
gels, one of whom offers Him a dish of fruit; others present flowers; an 



Picture Gallery 



179 



other lays his hand on the shoulder of a saint who stands by, holding 
a cross. (C.; h. 0,48, 1. 0,36). 

14 (83991). Francesco Mazzola, called n. PARMIGIANJNO. Portrait of 
Count Galeazzo Sanvitale. (W.; h. 1,07, 1. 0,80). He holds a medal in 
his hand ; on the table is his helmet and a battle axe. 

15 (83891). The Same. Portrait of Jerome de Vincentiis (1535). (C.; 
h. 1,19, 1. 0,88). Half length dressed in black. 

16 (83845). Michelangelo 
Anselmi. The Madonna be- 
tween two saints. (C.; h. 0,53, 
1. 0,4-?). Magdalene offers the 
infant Christ her box of oint- 
ment. St. Apollonia shows 
Him the pincers she carries. 

17 (83958). Copy from 
Francesco Mazzola. Portrait 
ofParmegianino. (C.; h. 0,45, 
1. 0,40). The original by him- 
self is in the Uffizzi. 

18 (84024). Francesco Maz- 
zola, called ii. PARMEGIANI- 
NO. Portrait of Anthea with 
whom he was in love. (C.; 
h. 1,39, 1- 0,88). She is paint- 
ed at the age of twenty. 
(Fig. 138). ( 

19 (83856). School of Par- 
ma, XVI. cent. Portrait of 
a Farnese Prince in a cuirass 
ornamented with gold. (C.; 
h. 0,89, 1 0,65). He carries a 
glove and rests his left hand 
on his helmet. 

20 (83825). Ditto. Por- 
trait of Ranuccio I. Fame- 
sef iC.| h. 1,55, ' 0,90), wear- 
ing a bright blue steel cuir- 
ass ornamented with gold. 
His left hand rests on a 
helmet with many coloured 
plumes. 

21 (84196). Francesco Maz- 
zola, called IL PARMIGIANI- 
NO. Portrait of Giovanni Ber- 
nardo di Ca^telbolognese in 

black with a precious stone in his cap. (W.; h. 0,63, 1. 0,50;. 

22 (83989). The Same. Holy Family, in tempera. (C.; h. 1,58, 1. 1,30). 
The Virgin is under a tree watching the infant Jesus asleep and stroking 
little St. John's cheek. Joseph is seen approaching from a distance, 
reading. 

23 (83839). Alessandro Bedoli-Mazzola (* Parma 1533, 1 1608). Pot trait 
of a girl wearing earrings and necklaces. (C.; h. 0,29, I. 0,39). 

24 (.33835). Giulio Cesare Procaccinl (* Bologna 1560?, t Milan 1626). 
Madonna and Child with an angel. (W.; h. 0,36, 1. 0,31). 




Fig. 138. Portrait of Anthea 
by Francesco Mazzola. 



i8o First Floor 

25 (83844). Alessandro Bedoli-Mazzola. Portrait of a young woman 
in white, wearing a pearl embroidered veil and pearl collar. (W.; h. 0,25, 
1- 0,35). 

26 (83976). Francesco Maria Rondani. Madonna and Child; in tem- 
pera. (C.; h. i ,06, 1. 0,90). 

27 (83975). Unknown Master, XVII. cent. A Sketch for the Burial of 
Jesus. (W.; h. 0,53, 1. 0,74). The body foreshortened is drawn with the 
head resting on the Madonna's knees. This ranks as a masterpiece. 

28 (83973). Michelangelo Anselmi. Holy Family. (W.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,51). 
Joseph and the Virgin gaze devoutly at the sleeping Child who is sur- 
rounded by angels. 




Fig- !39- Danae.Jby Tizian (Phot. Brogi). 
Room XIII. Titian. 

1 (83912). Leandro da Ponte, called LKANDRO BASSANO (* Bassano 
I 558> t Venice 1623). Portrait of a Lady in black with a lace collar and 
fine jewels. (C.; h. 1,06, 1. 1,00). 

2 (83948). Domenlco Theotocopull. Portrait of the Miniaturist Giulio 
Clovio. (C.; h. 0,58, 1. 0,86). He is drawing attention to the missal 
illuminated by him for Cardinal Farnese. 

3 (83908). Venetian School, XVII. cent., style of Giorgione. Uniden- 
tified portrait of a youth wearing furs and a broad brimmed hat. (C.; 
h. 0,52, 1. 0,38). He holds a parchment scroll in his left hand. The ex- 
pression and attitude is reminiscent of Giorgione. 

4 (84041). Venetian School, XVI. cent. A 7varrior in armour holding 
a commander's baton in his right hand and placing his left hand on the 
hilt of his dagger. The face lacks expression. (C.; h. 1,37, I. 1,02). 



Picture Gallery 



181 



5 (83971). TIzian Vecelli (* Pieve di Cadore 1477, f Venice 1576). 
Danae. (C.; h. 1,17, 1. 1,68). She is lying nude on a white couch recei- 
ving the golden rain. This picture betrays the utmost delight in volup- 
tuous sensuality. Signed : 1545. (Fig. 139). 

6 j(84019). The Same. Magdalene. (C.; h. 1,25, 1. 0,99). Her fair hair 
falls over her bare shoulders, an open book is propped against a skull. 
The picture is signed: TIZIANUS P. but has been grossly repainted and 
only the background retains its original beauty of colouring. 

7 (84001). Scipione Pulzone, called IL GAKTANO ? Unidentified portrait 
of a man wearing a fur cloak and a white collar. (C.: h. 0,44, 1. 0,33). 







Fig. 140. Holy Conversation, by Palma Vecchio. 

8 (84594). Tizian Vecelli. Portrait of Charles V. in black, holding a 
sheet of paper. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 0,74). Owing to repeated restorations the 
window on the right is now scarcely visible, nevertheless the picture 
remains on the whole a good example of the master's work. 

9 (83919). The Same. Alexander Famese, Cardinal of S. Lorenzo in 
Damaso. (C. ; h. 1,00, 1. 0,79). His costume and headgear seem very 
unbecoming. He appears to be laughing at himself. A very lifelike 
portrait. 

10 (83983). The Same. Portrait of Cardinal Pietro Bembo (1539-1540?). 
(C.; h. 1,19, 1. 1,00). He is seated with a book in his left hand, possibly 
his own poem on the hill of Asolo which may be seen through the win- 
dow on the right. This picture has been almost entirely spoilt by re- 
peated restorations. 

11 (84011). Jacopo Palma, called PALMA VKCCHIO (* Serinalta near 
Bergamo 1480 ? t Venice 1528). Holy Conversation. (C.; h. 1,34, 1. 2,01). 
The Virgin and Child with St. Jerome, St. Catherine and St. John the 
Baptist who implore her grace for the congregation of devout persons 
gathered below. Badly restored (Fig. 140). 



1 82 



First Floor 



12 (83920). Tizian Vecelli (?). Portrait of Paul III., holding a scroll 
in his right hand. Badly restored. (C.; h. 1,08, 1. 0,80). 

13 (84034). Jacopo da Ponte, called JACOPO BASSANO. The Raising 
of Lazarus. (C.; h. 0,57, 1. 0,48). A sketch for.N.o 65 in Room VIII. 

14 (83924). Tizian Vecel- 
li. Portrait of Pier Luigi 
Farnese. (C.; h. 0,99, 1. 0,78). 
This banneret of the Church 
Militant is painted in full ar- 
mour carrying a fieldmar- 
shal's baton. Behind him is 
his standard bearer. 

15 (83913). School of Pao- 
lo Veronese, XVI. cent. Un- 
identified portrait of a woman 
in a green satin dress with 
a lace collar. (C. ; h. 0,92, 
1. 0,77). 

16 (83921). Tizian Vecel- 
li. Paul III. with his nephews 
Aless'andro and Ottavio Far- 
nese. (C.; h. 2,00, 1. 1,74). He 
is evidently reproaching one 
of them who bows low. 
(Sketch 1547). 

17 (83974). The Same. 
Paul III. Farnese (1543). (C.; 
h. i, 06, 1. 0,82). The pope is 
seated in a violet satin arm- 
chair. His right hand is open 
as if to grasp something. 
A masterpiece. 

18. School of Titian. Por- 
trait of Lavinia Vecelli? (C.; 
h 0,84, 1 0,75). This slightly 
sketched picture is yet re- 
markable for its richness of 
colour. 

19 (83957). Paolo Calia 
rl, called PAOLO VERONESE 
(Verona 1528,! Venice 1588). 
The Pool of Bethesda. (C.; 
h. 0,68, 1. 0,55). This picture 
is perhaps the sketch for the 
painting on the organ at St. 
Sebastian's in Venice. 

20 (83977). Tiziano Vecel- 
li. Portrait of Philip II. A 
masterpiece. (C. ; h. 1,87, 1. 
1,00). The king is wearing 
the order of the golden fleece; 
he carries a pair of gloves 

and clasps his dagger with his right hand (Fig. 141) 




Fig. 141. Philip II., by Tiziau 
(Phot. Anderson). 



Picture Gallery 



183 



Room XIV. Raffael. 

1 (81001). Raffaello Santi, called RAFFAEL SANZIO (* Urbino 1483, f 
Rome 1520). Portrait of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, afterwards Pope 
Paul III ; full length standing in his red robes. (W.; h. 1,37, 1. 0,90). 
He holds some papers in his right hand. Landscape background (Fig. 142). 

2 (83779). Copy of a Raffael. The Madonna with the Veil. (W.; h. 1,15, 
1. 0,87). School of Polidoro da Caravaggio. The Madonna takes away a 
veil from the infant Christ who lies naked on the couch trying to catch 
the Moating fabric in his hands. St. Joseph leans on a stick to the^right 
watching Him. 

3 (83783). Ditto. The 
Madonna del Passeggio. 
(W. ; h. 0,54 , 1- 0,43). 
The original is the pro- 
perty of Lord Ellesmere. 
The Madonna leads the 
infant Jesus up to little 
St. John who stoops to 
embrace Him. St. Joseph 
is on the left. 

4 (84216). Angelo di 
Cosimo Tori , called IL 
BRONZING? (*Monlicelli 
neat Florence 1502, f Flo- 
rence 1572). Unidentified 
Portrait. (W. ; h. 0,69, 
1. 0,50). A richly dressed 
woman holding a book 
in her left hand. 

5 (84002). Andrea d' 
Agnolo , called ANDREA 
DEL SARTO? (* Florence 
1486, f 1531). Leo X, Copy 
of a Raffael (1525) at the 
Pitti Gallery. (W. ; h. 
1,61, 1. 1,19). The pope 
is seated at a small ta- 
ble ; beside him are the 
cardinals Giulio de' Me- 
dici and Luigi de' Rossi. 

6 (83791). Copy of a 
Raffael. The Virgin and 
Child. (W. ; h. 0,87 , 1. 
0,64). He is on her lap 

and clutches at a corner p . Caidinal Farnese, by Raffael 

of her cloak. (phot i} _ 

7 (84203). Angelo di 

Cosimo Tori, called IL BRONZING? Unidentified Portrait of a man with a 
closed book in his right hand. (W.; h. 0,69, 1. 0,62). 

8 (83968). Sebastiano Luciani, called SEBASTIANO DEL PIOMBO ('Ve- 
nice? 1485, t Rome 1547). Holy Family. (SI.; h. 1,18, 1. 0,88). The Virgin 
is in the act of removing the scarf in which the infant Jesus is wound. 
St. Joseph stands beside her, also an angel. 

9 (84039). The Same. Clement VII. de' Medici seated with his arms 




1 84 



First Floor 



resting on the arms of his chair. (C.; 1,45, 1. 1,00). He has an air of 
dignity which reminds one of a roman emperor. 

10 (83993). Marcello Vcnusti. Mantua 1512, f Rome 1580). The Last 
Judgement. (W.; h. 1,90, 1. 1,45). Copy of Michelangelo. This picture is 
of great value as a careful contemporary copy of the now partially de- 
stroyed original; every detail may be clearly seen and studied. 

11 (83988). Giulio Pippi, called GIULIO ROMANO (* Rome 1492, t 
Mantua 1546). The Madonna ^with the cat. (W.; h. 1,68, 1. 1,41). Almost 




Fig. 143. Portrait of the cavalier Tebaldeo, by Fr. Rossi dei Salvienti 

(Phot. Brogi). 

a copy of Raffael's Madonna with the Pearl in the Prado at Madrid. 
Mary sits by the cradle with a basket of needlework beside her on the 
floor and a cat. On her left and right are little St. John and St. Anne, 
St. Joseph is in the background. 

12 (84000). Francesco Rossi del Salvienti, called n, SAI.VIATI (* Flo- 



Picture Gallery 185 



rence 1510, t Rome 1563). Portrait of the cavalier Tebaldeo. (W.; h. 0,75, 
1. 0,63). The young soldier places his right hand on his dagger. (Fig. 143). 

13 (83995). School of Florence. Unidentified Portrait of a young man 
in white, wearing a triangular cap. (W.; h. 0,48, 1. 0,40). 

14 (84205). Copy of a Filippino Lippi. His own portrait painted on 
wood from the fresco in the Church of the Carmine in Florence. 
(W ; h. 0,42, 1. 0,31). 

15 (83916). Sebastiano Luciani, called SEBASTIANO DEL PIOMBO. Sketch 
for a portrait of Clement VII. (SI.; h. 0,48, 1.0,32). Only the pope's 
head is painted in profile on slate. 

16 (84036). Angelo di Cosimo Tori, called IL BRONZING (?). Tiuo archi- 
tects. (W.; h. i, 20, 1.0,90). An older and a younger man busily engaged 
with an architectural design. 

17 (84005). Raffaello Santi, called RAFFAEL SANZIO (?). So called Ma- 
donna del divino amore. (W.; h. 1,38, 1. 1,09). The infant Jesus is seated 
on Mary's lap ; St. Anne apparently entreats Him to bless little St. 
John who kneels before Him. St. Joseph is in the background. Part of 
this picture including the head of St. Anne was painted by Raffael him- 
self; the rest probably by one of his pupils. 

Room XV. 
Tuscan and Venetian Schools, XV. cents. 

1 (84198). Filippino Lippi ? (* Prato 1457-58, f Florence 1504). The 
Annunciation. (W.; h. 1,17, 1. 1,24). The angel hands the Virgin a lily. 
St. John the baptist and St. Andrew are painted on either side of her. 
In the background are the Apenines with Florence in the middle di- 
stance. 

2 (84193). Sandro di Mariano Filipepi, called BOTTICELLI (* Florence 
circa 1445, f 151)- The infant Jesus is brought to the Virgin who is 
seated on the right, by two angels. (W.; h. 0,98, 1. 0,71). 

3 (83778). Pier di Lorenzo, called PIER DI COSIMO (* Florence circa 
1462, f I 5 21 )- Holy Family. (W.; round, diam. 0,84). The Child seated 
on His mother's lap is peeling a pomegranate. St. John is on their right. 
Behind them is a landscape with trees and rocks. 

4 (84209). Bastiano di Bartolo Maluardi (* S. Gemignano, t Florence? 
Active between 1482-1513). Madonna and Child with St. John and three 
angels bearing lilies. (W.; h. 0,95, 1. 0,95). 

5 (84188). Lorenzo di Andrea 1'Oderigo, called LORENZO DI CREDI 
(* Florence 1456-7, f J 537)- The Virgin kneeling before the infant Jesus. 
(W.; h. 1,17, 1. 0,88). On her left is an angel and on her right, under an 
archway St. Joseph. The background is a hilly landscape with a stream 
running through it. 

6 (84191). School of Verrocchio, XVI. cent. The Madonna caressing 
the infant fesus. (W.; h. 2,02, 1. 1,83). At her feet is a rich carpet. 
The landscape in the background is divided into two parts by an 
architectural building of marble, ornamented with gold. 

7 (84186). Tommaso di Cristoforo Fino, called MASOLINO DI PANI- 
CALE (* Panicale 1383, t 1440?). The Assumption, painted on a gold 
ground. (W.; h. 1,42, 1. 0,76). 

8 (125489). Tommaso di Giovanni di Simone Guidi, called MASACCIO. 
(* Castel di S. Giovanni in Valdarno 1401, f Rome 1428). The Crucifixion. 
(W.; h. 0,77, 1. 0,64). The Madonna and St. John stand weeping on 



1 86 First Floor 

either side of the cross. Magdalene with arms uplifted in despair is 
painted with great feeling. 

9 (84138). Giuliano Bugiardini (* Florence 1475, f 1554). Madonna 
Ti'it/i Jesus on her lap and little St. John beside her. (W.; h. 1,00, 1. 0,81). 

10 (84195). Tommaso d! Cristofaro Fine, called MASOLINO DA PANI- 
CALE. Foundation of the Church of Maria delta Neve in Rome (about 
1422). (W. ; h. 1,44, 1. 0,76). In the presence of many witnesses Pope 
Liborius draws the groundplan of the church in the snow with a 
mattock. On high are Jesus and the Madonna. 

11 (84294). School of Gaddi, XIV. cent. The Annunciation. (W.; h. 
0,42, 1. 0,26). In the centre is the Virgin with the angel saluting her; 
on the left in St. John the baptist (,,Ecce Agnus Dei") and St. Francis 
of Assisi ; on the right St. Louis and another saint. 

12. Sinione Martini (* Siena 1283, \ Avignon 1344). Christ in the act 
of blessing. (W.; h. 0,67, 1. 0,42). The bible on His left is open at the 
text: I am the Way, the Truth and the Life. " Painted on a gold- 
ground; intended to be carried out in mosaic in the apse of a church. 

13 (84311). Bernardo Daddi (* Florence, active between 1328-1350). 
The Madonna and Child enthroned between four saints. (W.; h. 0,44, 
1. 0,51). The Child strokes her cheek. 

14 (84273). Byzantine School, XIII. cent. Triptych painted on a 
gold ground. Christ with hands raised to bless, between St. Nicholas 
and St. Athanasius. (W.; h. 0,12, 1. 0,20). 

15 (84271). Florentine School, XIV. cent. Diptych. Crucifixion and 
Madonna and Child. (W.; h. 0,12, 1. 0,20). 

16-18 (84261, 84316, 84258). Tuscan School, XIV. cent. Triptych on a 
gold ground. In the centre St. Anne embracing the Virgin and Child. 
On the side panels are St. Peter and St. Paul. (W.; h. 0,86,1.0,29 
h. 0,88, 1. 0,31' h. 0,86, 1. 0,27). 

19. School of Parma, XVI. cent. Sacrificial Altar. (W.; h. 0,83, 
1. 0,45). On either side are kneeling forms in chiara oscura. 

20 (84487). Lorenzo Lotto (* Venice circa 1480, f Loreto ? 1556-57). 
Portrait of Bernardo Rossi, Bishop of Treviso ; almost full face with his 
eyes fixed on the spectator. (W.; h. 0,54, 1. 0,41). The painter has 
succeeded admirably in portraying his sitter's intelligence and strength 
of character. 

21 (83964). Andrea Mantegna (* near Vicenza 1431, t Mantua 1506). 
Portrait of Francesco Goncaga in his cardinal's robes. (W.; h. 0,29, 
1. 0,19). 

22 (83932). Alessandro Bonvicino, called IL MORETTO (* Brescia circa 
1498, f 1554)- Ecce Homo. (W.; h. 0,58,1.0,41). Christ bound to a pillar. 
His cloak and the scourges are lying on the ground. 

23 (83902). Alvise Vivarini (* Murano about 1445, f Venice 1502-3) 
The Virgin and Child enthroned; St. Bernard of Siena and St. Francis 
stand beside her. ( W. h. 1,18, 1. 1,25); painted on a gold ground. 
Signed : ALVISE VIVARINI P. VENKTIA 1495. 

24 (83943). Girolamo di Bernardino da Santo Croce (from the pro- 
vince of Bergamo, t Venice 1556). The Martyrdom of St. Lawrence. 
(W.; h. 0,75, ' 0.93)- The Saint lies on a gridiron amidst a crowd of 
soldiers and spectators in the presence of the king who issues orders to 
the executioners. 

25 (83906). Bartolomeo Vivarini (* Murano, active between 1450-1499). 
The Virgin, enthroned, holds the sleeping Child in her lap. (W.; h. 1,18, 



Picture Gallery 



187 



1. i ,20). On either side of her seat are angels supporting flower vases 
from which an arch springs. On the right are S. Nicola of Bari and a 
bishop ; on the left St. Roch and another bishop. On high are four 
other saints: Signed : OPUS BARTOLOMEI VIVARINI DE MURANO 1469. 

26 (131059). Antonio da Solario, called LO ZINGARO (* Venice? 2nd. 
half of the XV. cent., t 1509-10?). A devout worshipper kneels before the 
Madonna who holds the naked infant Christ erect. (W.; h. 0,85, 1. 0,66). 
A landscape with rocks and flowers is visible through a window on the 
right. Signed : ANTONIUS DE SOLARIUS V. P. 

27 (83960). Giovanni Busi, called IL CARIANI ? (* Fuipiano near Ber- 
gamo about 1480, f after 1547). Madonna and Child with John the Bap- 
tist, St. Barbara, St. Joseph and another. (W.; h. 0,45, 1. 0,72). 




Fig. 144. The Transfiguration, by Giov. Bellini (Phot. Brogi). 

28 (129337). Jacopo dei Barbari ? (* Venice? about 1450, f Brussels? 
before 1516). The Mathematical Proof. (W.; h. 0,96, 1. 1,20). The painter 
whose name is inscribed below, stands in rich costume beside his master 
Fra Luca Paciolo. 

29 (83954). Vincenzo Catena (* Treviso, t Venice 1531). The Cir- 
cumcision (W.; h. 0,80, 1. 1,05). The aged Simeon accomplishes the rite 
in the presence of the Virgin, St. Joseph and other witnesses. 

30 (83946). Andrea Mantegna. St. Eufemia standing in a niche, bear- 
ing a martyr's palm and the lily of purity. A lion lays his head against 
her right arm. (C.; h. 1,71, 1. 0,77). Signed: OPUS ANDREAE MANTE- 
GNAE 1454. 

31 (83784). Boccaccio Boccaccino (* Cremona about 1467, t 1524-25). 



1 88 First Floor 

Adoration of the Infant Christ. (W.; h. 1,18, 1. 0,95). St. Joseph on 
one side and the Virgin with two shepherds on the other. Three sing- 
ing angels float over the roof of the shed. 

32 (83956). Lorenzo Lotto. Virgin and Child -with saints. (W.; h. 
0,54, 1. 0,87). Mary is seated on the right with the Child on her lap. 
On her left are St. Peter Martyr with little St. John. Landscape back- 
ground. Signed : 1503. 

33 (a3990). Giovanni Bellini (* Venice 1428, t 1516). The Transfigu- 
ration. (W.; h. 1,15, 1. 1,50). This is one of the finest pictures in the 
collection. Christ between the two prophets. At His feet are the disci- 
ples in amazement. In the background is a wonderful landscape with 
white clouds. Signed : JOANNES BELLI. (Fig. 144). 

Room XVI. Solimena and de Mura. 

1. Francesco de Mura, called FRANCESCHIELLO. The Annunciation. 
(C.; h. 1,44, 1. 0,83). The archangel surrounded by angels and cherubim 
descends on the left to hand a lily to the kneeling Virgin. 

2. The Same. Vase of Flowers between two allegorical figures. (C. ; 
h. 0,64, 1. 0,50). 

3 (131415). Francesco Solimena, called L'ABBATE Ciccio. The Mas- 
sacre of the Giwstiniani. Sketch for a painted ceiling in the Senate 
House in Genoa. (C.; h. 2,75, 1. 1,63). The Sultan Soliman orders the 
execution of eighteen youths of the house of Giustiniani in Genoa, at 
Chios. Angels are throwing wreaths to the victims. 

4. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Carita. (C.; h. 0,35, 1. 0,47). Com- 
passion, represented as a female figure with wings, holding two children 
on her lap. 

5 (84379). Sebastiano Conca (* Gaeta 1676, t Rome 1764). St. Peter 
blessing a warrior. (C.; h. 0,72, 1. 0,58). 

6 (125198). Francesco Solimena, called L' ABBATE Ciccio. The Ma- 
donna and 'Child surrounded by angels appear to St. Charles Borro- 
maus who kneels on the left. (C.; h. 0,70, 1. 0,51). 

7 (131424). Francesco de Mura, called FRANCESCHIELLO. The Virgin 
visiting St. Elizabeth. (C.; h. 0,93, 1. 1,31). St. Joachim joins them. 

8. Francesco Solimena called, L' ABBATE Ciccio. The Assumption. 
(C.; h. 1,25, 1. 0,87). 

9. Giacinto Diana, called n. POZZOLANO. Modesty, a half length 
figure with clasped hands. (C.; h. 0,68, 1. 0,45). 

10 (131419). Francesco de Mura, called FRANCESCHIELLO. St. Louis 
of France and St. Louis Gonzaga, a sketch. (C.; h. 1,56, 1. 1,04). The 
former raises his eyes to the latter who appears with the Madonna. 

11 (84390). Giuseppe Bonito (* Castellammare di Stabia 1707, t Na- 
ples 1789). The Dedication of Solomon's Temple. (C.; h. 0,77, 1. 1,30). A 
sketch for the church of Sta. Chiara. 

12 (84394). Francesco de Mura, called FRANCESCHIKLLO. Shepherds 
bring gifts to the Virgin and Child. (C.; h. 1,31, 1. 1,05). 

13. The Same. Vases between two allegorical figures. (C.; h. 0,64, 
1. 0,50). 

14 (131422). The Same. St. Benedict with his monks receiving King 
Totilas in the vestibule of a temple. Sketch for the ceiling of the 
Church of S. Severino. (C.; h. 0,92, 1. 1,54). 



Picture Gallery 189 

15-18 (131433, 131436, 131434, 131435). The Same. Cupids. (C.; h. 0,38, 

1. 0,20). 

19, 22, 25, 28 (131425, 131428, 131426, 131427). The Same. Women and 
Children. (C.; h. 0,74, 1. 0,50). 

20 (131421). The Same. Madonna del Rosario. (C.; h. 0,96, 1. 0,50). 
The Madonna hands St. Benedict a wreath of roses. 

21 (131416). The Same. St. Benedict at the top of a flight of steps in 
a trance. (C.; h. 2,05, 1. 1,26). At his feet are a group of monks and 
other believers. Below are several figures in XVIII. cent, costume. 

23 (131417). The Same. The flight into Egypt. (C.; h. 0,98, 1. 0,56). 

24 (131437). The Same. The god Hymen bearing a lighted torch and 
escorted by cupids, descends upon Modesty and tries to raise her veil 
with his left hand. (C.; h. 3,26, 1. 2,10). 

26 (131418). The Same. Death of St. Joseph. (C.; h. i,o5, 1. 0,54). A 
sketch for N. 12, Room V. 

27 (131420). The Same. The Madonna is received into Heaven by 
the Holy Trinity. (C.; h. 2,08, 1. 1,30). The apostles gaze awestruck at 
the miracle. 

29. The Same. Sketch for N. 24. (C.; h. 0,72, 1. 0,44). 

30-33 (131429, 30, 31, 32). The Same. Cupids. (C.; h. 0,38, 1. 0,20). 

3i (131423). The Same. St. Benedict receiving two novices, Maurus 
and Placidus who are brought to him by their fathers. (C.; h. 0,91 
1. 1,56). Sketch for a fresco in the cupola of the Church of S. Severino. 

Room XVII. Ribera and Stanzioni. 

1 (84053). Fabrizio Santafede. The Madonna seated amidst angels. 
Below are St. Jerome and St. Gambacato of Pisa. (W.; h. 2,28, 1. 1,35). 
Dated : 1595. 

2 (84400). School of Massimo Stanzioni (XVII. cent.). Madonna and 
Child under a tree, with angels above them. (C.; h. 0,38, 1. 0,27). 

3 (83978). Jose de Ribera, called LO SPAGNOLETTO. St. Sebastian tied 
to a tree. (C.; h. 1,21, 1. 1,00). Signed: JUSBPE DE RIBERA, ESPANOL F. 1651. 

4 (84397). Pacecco de Rosa. St. Joseph tenderly wrapping the naked 
Christ child in his cloak. (C.; h. 1,15, 1. 0,76). 

5 (84366). Andrea Vaccaro. Magdalene drawing her cloak together 
over her bosom, and gazing heavenwarSs. (C.; h. 0,82, 1. 0,59). 

6 (83979). Jose de Ribera, called LO SPAGNOLETTO. St. Jerome falling 
on His knees at the trumpet blast of the angel announcing the Last 
Judgement. (C.; h. 2,62, 1. 1,64). (Fig. 145). 

7 (84427). Massimo Stanzioni. St. Agatha, quietly resigned, presses a 
cloth to her wounded breast. (C.; h. 0,88, 1. 0,72). 

8 (84352). Cesare Fracanzano. Half length figure of an old man with 
a white beard ; the eyes, mouth, and hands are very lifelike. (C.; h. 
0,64, 1. 0,48). 

9 (83980). Jose de Ribera, called LO SPAGNOLETTO. St. Jerome seated 
at a table on which are some books and a skull. (C.; h. 1,25, 1. : ,00). 
Signed: JUSEPE DE RIBERA ESPANOL F. 1651. 

10 (84396). The Same. St. Bruno kneeling at the entrance to a cave. 
(C.; h. 0,38, 1. 0,27). An angel shows him a book in which the rules of 
his order are inscribed. 



igo 



First Floor 



11 (84432). Andrea Vaccaro. 5;. Anthony of Padua kneeling at a 
prie Dieu gazes at a vision of the infant Christ who appears and bles- 
ses him. (C.; h. 1,30, 1. 1,02). 




Fig. 145. St. Jerome, hy J. de Ribera (Phot. Brogi). 

12. Bernardo Cavallino (* Naples 1622, f 1654). Judith holding the 
head of Holofernes gazes triumphantly upwards. (C.; h. 1,02, 1. 1,26). 

13. Jose de Ribera, called i.o SPAGNOI.KTTO. God Ike Father. (C.; h. 
1,10, 1. i, 10). Half length figure surrounded by clouds, with His right 



Picture Gallery 191 



hand raised to bless and His left resting on the earthly sphere. Below 
Him are two cherubim. 

14 (84635). Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. Masquerade. (W.; h. 
0,26, 1. 0,53). 

15 (84335). Andrea Vaccaro. St. Francis of Assisi in an ecstasy of 
prayer. ^C.; h. 1,01, 1. 0,74). Beside him is a companion kneeling before 
the cross. 

16 (84492). Luca Giordano, called FA PRESTO. Half length portrait, 
fullface of an old man in furs. (C.; h. 0,80, 1. 0,61). A bad imitation of 
Rembrandt's technique, the painting of the hands is especially poor. 

17 (84421). Bernardo Cavaliino. St. Cecilia between two angels, one 
of whom crowns her while the other makes music. (C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,49). 

18 (81530). Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. The denial of St. Peter. 
(C.; h. 0,98, 1. 1,35). T ne maid stands on the right, on the left are 
other figures. 

19-23 (84429, 84425, 84395, 84399, 84357). Pacecco de Rosa. Small 
round pictures. A shepherd with bagpipes, the death of St. Alexis, the 
Madonna delle grazie, St. Jerome, the denial of St. Peter. (W.; h. 
0,25, 1. 0,25). 

24 (84042). Jose de Ribera, called LO SPAGNOLETTO. Silenus lying 
drunk on the ground surrounded by satyrs. (C.; h. 1,85, 1. 2,29). On the 
left is the inscription : JOSEPHUS DS RIBERA HISPANUS, VALENTIN 

ET ACADEM1CUS ROMANUS FACIEBAT PARTENOPE 1626. The picture has 

been entirely spoilt by frequent attempts at restoration. 

25 (84381). Bernardo Cavaliino. St. Sebastian lying on the ground ; 
some holy women are binding up his wounds. (C.; h. 0,65, 1. 0,53). 

26 (84368). Manner of Pacecco de Rosa. A young woman plaiting her 
hair. (C.; h. 0,79, 1. 0,64). 

27 (84590). Cesare Fracanzano. The prodigal son returns and kisses 
his fathers hand. (C.; h. 1,02, 1. 1,28). 

28. Neapolitan School, XVIII. cent. The finding of Moses. (C.; 
h. 0,25, 1. 0,54). 

29 (84380). Andrea Belvedere. Hydrangeas and Canterbury bells. iC.; 
1,01, 1. 0,75). 

30. Massimo Stanzioni. St. Bruno. (C.; h. 2,02, 1. 1,17). The founder 
of the order of Carthusians is represented in a devout ecstasy. 

Room XVIII. Salvator Rosa. 

1 (84416). Andrea d! Leone (Pupil of Corenzio and A. Falcone; * Na- 
ples, f 1675). Battle between Jews and Amalekites. (C. ; h. 1,10, 1. 1,27). 
In the foreground is a cavalry engagement, warriors armed with lances 
approach from either side. 

2 (84071). Carlo Coppola (from Naples ; Pupil of A. Falcone XVII. 
cent.). Spanish cavalry. (C.; h. 1,00. 1. 1,50). Some officers stand in the 
foreground on the left ; there is a wooded hill in the background. 

3 (84391). Salvator Rosa. (Arenella near Naples 1615, t Rome 1673). 
The parable of the mote ant the beam. (C.; h. 2,00, 1. 1,21). 

4 (84431). School of Salvator Rosa, XVII. cent. Rocky sea coast, a 
few soldiers are climbing a cliff on the left. (C.; h. 0,65, 1. 0,98). 

5 (84375). Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. Seascape. (C.; h. 0,37, 1. 0,52). 



igz First Floor 

6 (84423). Marzio Masturzo (from Naples, a pupil' of Salvator Rosa. 
XVII. cent.) River scene with rocks and trees here and there and people 
bathing. (C.; h. 0,66, 1. 0,97). 

7 (84038). School of Salvator Rosa, XVII. cent. Battle Scene. (C.; 




Fig. 146. Jesus seated amongst the scribes, by Salv. Rosa (Phot. Brogi). 

h. 1,17, 1. 2,56). The clouds of smoke caused by a conflagration mingle 
with the storm clouds in the sky. Horses in falling have pinned their 
riders to the ground. 



Picture Gallery 193 



8 (83967). Salvator Rosa. Jesus seated amongst the scribes, one of 
whom wears a yellow garment and a turban. (C.; h. 2,01, 1. 1,32). Their 
faces are of a very common type (Fig. 146). 

9. Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. Spanish Cavalry. (C. ; h. 0,42, 
1. 0,32). 

10. Ditto. A Harbour. (C. ; h. 0,38, 1. 0,78). Two large sailing boats 
and countless merchants on the wharves. 

11 (84057). Ditto. Cardplayers in front of an inn. (C.; h. 0,42, 1. 0,32). 

12 (125212). School of Salvator Rosa, XVII. cent. A group of people 
with a horse and a dog resting at the foot of a high cliff. (C. ; h. 1,15, 
1- 0,95). 

13 (84351). Ditto. Battle scene. (C.; h. 0,48, 1. 0,81). 

14. Manner of Andrea Belvedere, XVI II. cent. Decorative Panel, 
Flowers, Fruit and Animals. (C.; h. 0,75, 1. 1,60). 

15. Leonardo Coccorante (* Naples, Pupil of Solimena, XVIII. cent.). 
Landscape. (C.; h. 0,28, 1. 0,21). 

16 (84367). School of Salvator Rosa, XVII. cent. Battle scene; a 
cavalry charge. (C.; h. 0,35, 1. 0,60). 

17. Leonardo Coccorante. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,28, 1. 0,21). 

18. Domenico Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO. The Death of Ab- 
salom. (C.'; h. 0,79, I- i, 6). A soldier in the act of spearing the youth 
who hangs from a tree. 

19. Aniello Falcone (* Naples 1600, f 1665). Battle scene. (C.; h. 
0,78, 1. 1,23). The men are armed with swords, clubs and bows. 

20 (131556). Manner of Salvator Rosa. A drummer at the head of a 
mounted force. (C.; h. 0,28, I. 0,49). 

21. Neapolitan School, XVII. cent. A group of Neapolitan artists. 
(C.; h. 0,24, 1. 0,26). The label with the skull which is the token of the 
legendary Company of Death of the Year 1648 is obviously a later 
addition. 

22 (131557). Manner of Salvator Rosa. Battle scene. (C. ; h. 0,28, 1. 
0,49). A duel between two mounted men in the foreground. 

23 (125228). Salvator Rosa (?). Landscape. (C. ; h. 0,76, 1. 1,02). The 
trees are bent by the storm, a feature is the natural arch. 

24 (84411). Domenico Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO. (C. ; h. 0,63, 
1. 0,76). St. Onofrio in the desert praying ; beside him is a stag. 

25. Giuseppe Recco (* Naples 1634, f 1695). Still life. Fisk. (C.; h. 
o,75, 1. i, 60) cf. N.o 14. 

26 (84426). Aniello Falcone. Spanish Soldiers. (C.; h. 0,22, 1. 0,42). 

27 (84358). School of Salvator Rosa. St. Francesco di Paola, praying. 
(C.; h. 0,44, 1. 0,32). 

28 (84430). Aniello Falcone. Battle scene on the shore. (C.; h. 0,26, 
1. 0,52). Ships are endeavouring to land reinforcements. 

29. Andrea di Leone. Spepherds with their flocks halting at a well; 
also country people with horses and a camel. (C.; h. 0,72, 1. 0,99). 

30 (84415). Domenico Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO. St. Paul the 
Hermit and St. Anthony in the desert. (C.; h. 0,63, 1. 0,76). 

31 (84334). Giovanni Do (from Naples, XVII. cent.). Landscape with 
houses and towers along the sea coast. (C.; h 0,45, 1. 1,18). On the 
left are some peasants with a donkey. 

13 



194 



First Floor 



32 (84046). Domenlco Gargiulo, called Micco SPADARO. Fight between 
fetus and Amalekites in a valley and on a road leading up hill. (C.; h. 
0,78, 1. 1,05). 

33. Andrea di Leone ? A peasant woman riding a horse, driving her 
flocks home. (C.; h. 0,51, 1. 0,791. 

34.' Manner of Andrea Belvedere, XVIII. cent. Decorative panel, com- 
panion piece to N. 14. (C.; h. 0,75, 1. 1,60). 

Room XIX. Velasquez. 

1 (84080). Hermann von 
Swaneveld (* Woerden in 
Holland about 1600, t Paris 
1656?) Diana approaching in 
her chariot to visit Endymion 
in the wood. (C. ; h. 0,75, 1. 
0,98). 

2 (83821). Simon Vouet 
(* Paris 1590, t 1649). An an- 
gel holding the spear red- 
dened by the blood of Christ. 
(C.; h. 1,04, 1. 0,77). 

3 (84531). Copy from Ru- 
bens. The dead body of Christ 
lying on straw tended by two 
Marys and a man. (C. : h. 
1,47, 1- i.3)- A bad copy, late 
XVIII. cent. 

4 (84570). Johann Spil- 
berg (* Diisseldorf 1619, t 
1690). Portrait of an oldladf 
wearing a stiff ruff. (C.; h. 
i ,08, 1. 0,83). Signed: 1639 F. 
SPILBERG. 

5 (84015). Claude Gellee, 
called CLAUDE LORRAIN (* 
Champagne about 1690 , f 
Rome 1682). Landscape with 
nymphs. (C.; h. 1,56, 1. 2,00). 
There is a temple on the left 
and the country reminds one 
of the Roman campagna. 

6 (84564). Thomas Hen 
drikjz de Keyser (* Amster- 
dam about 1596, t 1667). Por- 
trait of an official in a large ruft. (W.; h. 1,15, 1. 0,87). He holds papers 
in one hand and rests the other on his hip. 

7 (84527). Anton van Dyck (* Antwerp 1599, t London 1641). The 
Crucifixion. (C.; h. 1,32, 1. 0,87). Christ breathing His last prayer. 
(Fig. 147). 

8 (84501). Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen (* London 1593, t Amsterdam 
or Utrecht 1664). Portrait of an official seated in an armchair, gazing 
thoughtfully before him. (C.; h. 1,24, 1. 0,86). Signed : 1649. 

9. Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,72, 1. 0,98). 




Fig. 147. Crucifixion, by A. van Dyck 
(Phot. Brogi). 



Picture Gallery 195 



10 (84576). School of Anton van Dyck, XVII. cent. Portrait of an 
official wearing a cloak and a white ruff. (C.; h. 1,11. 1. 0,88). He car- 
ries gloves in one hand and rests the other on his hip. 

11. Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,72, 1. 0,98). 

12 (84508). Rembrandt van Rijn ? Portrait of himself at an advan- 
ced age, dressed in silk and furs. (C.; h. 0,80, 1. 0,61). Perhaps a copy 
of his own picture at the Uffizzi by a talented pupil. 

13 (83805). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C. ; h. 0,92, 
1- i,35). 

14 (84028). Jacob Courtois, called BORGOGNONE (* S. Hyppolyte 1621, 
t Rome 1670). Battle scene in stormy weather. (C.; h. 0,70, 1. 0,90). 

15 (83970). School of van Dyck, XVII. cent. Unidentified Portrait 
of a young nobleman glancing over his shoulder at the spectator 
(C.; h. 0,61, 1. 0,50). 




Fig. 148. The Drinker, Copy from Velasquez (Phot. Brogi). 

16 (84048). Copy from Velasquez. The Drinker. (C.; h. 1,64, 1. 2,28). 
This picture is painted in tempera and of curious technique ; it appears 
cold and colourless compared to the original at the Prado. (Fig. 148). 

17 (84032K Jacob Courtois, called BORGOGNONE. Battle scene. (C.; h. 
0,68, 1. 0,93). In the centre two leaders are engaged in single combat 
surrounded by other fighters. 

18 (84569). School of van Dyck, XVII. cent. Unidentified Portrait 
of a nobleman with a fair beard, dressed in black. (W.; h. 0,56, 1. 0,47). 
He turns to the right. 

19 (84571). Ditto. Portrait oj a young princess in a pearl and gold 
embroidered dress and a large lace ruff. (C.; h. 0,75, 1. 0,59). 

13* 



196 First Floor 

20 (83803). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,91, 
1- i,33). 

21 (83768). Claude Gellee, called CLAUDE LORRAIN. Seascape. (C.; h. 
0,74, 1- 1,00). A villa on the shore and ships at sea in sunset light. 

22 (83827). Simon Vouet. An angel bearing the bloodstained hand- 
kerchief and the dice with which the soldiers cast lots for Christ's 
raiment. (C.; h. 1,04, 1. 0,77). 

XX. Foreign Schools of the XVI. -XVII I. cents. 

1 (84567). Cornells Pietersz Bega? (Pupil of Adrian van Ostade,* Haar- 
lem 1620, f 1664). Interior of a country house. (C.; h. 0,44, 1. 0,59). 

2 (83808). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape with a water- 
fall. (C.; h. 0,66, 1. 0,50). Fishermen are visible between the rocks. 

3 (84452). School of Joachim Patinir, XVI. cent. St. Jerome kneeling 
at the entrance to a cave. (W.; h. 0,37, 1. 0,51). 

4 (84510). David de Koning (* Antwerp 1636, f Brussels about 1699). 
Dogs hunting a stag. (C.; h. 1,24, 1. 1,73). 

5 (84587). The Same. Trophies of the chase. (C.; h. 1,24, 1. 1,73;. 

6 (84572). David Teniers the younger (* Antwerp 1610, t Brussels 
1690). Players and onlookers in a tavern. (W.; h. 0,53, 1. 0,67). 

7 (84517). Johann Both ? (* Utrecht circa 1610, f Utrecht 1652). Land- 
scape. (C.; h. 0,37, 1- 0,50). 

8 (84496). Franz Pourbus the younger (* Antwerp 1575, f Paris 1622). 
Portrait of a young woman. (W.; h. 0,50, 1. 0,37). 

9. Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C. ; h. 0,85, 1. 1,15). 
Trees and a river. On the left, three women running away. 

10 (84573). Pieter van Avont (* Mecheln 1600, t Mecheln 1652). Holy 
Family. (W. ; h. 0,53, 1. 0,71). The Madonna is seated under a tree, 
with the Child in Her lap, surrounded by angels. 

11 (84545). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Woman bathing in a lake 
which is seen between the trees of the foreground. (C.; h. 0,32, 1. 0,48). 

12 (84520). Ditto. Landscape. (C. ; h. 0,46, 1. 0,34). A ruined arch 
and trees. 

13 (84348). Giuseppe Recco. Parrots and other birds, various rep- 
tiles, shells, flowers and fruit are all represented in this picture. (C.; 
h. 1,01, 1. 0,36). 

14 (84565). Johann Both. Landscape. (C ; h. 0,75, 1. 0,97). 

15 (84566). Johann van Kessel the elder (?) (* Antwerp 1626,11679). 
Flowers and fruit. (C.; h. 0,63, 1. 0,81). 

16 (84500). Daniel Seghers (* Antwerp 1590, t 1661). Statue of the 
Madonna and Child in a niche adorned with leaves. (C.; h. 1,29, 1. 0,99). 

17 (84521). Christian Berentz (* Hamburg 1658, f 1722)- Woman with 
a basket of fruit. (C.; h. 2,49, 1. 1,74). A boy offers her a bunch of 
grapes. Below them is a table with dishes upon it. (This picture is inscrib- 
ed with the artist's name and the date 1696). 

18 (84578). Johann van Kessel the elder. (?). Flowers and Fruit. 
(C.; h. 0,63, 1. 0,78). 

19 (84522). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Flower Study. (C.; h. 1,15, 
1. 0,90). 



Picture Gallery 197 



20. Baldassare de Caro of Naples, XVIII. cent. Trophies of the 
chase. (C.; h. 0,91, 1. 1,17). Signed: B. DE CARD. 

21 (84577). Johann Both. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,75, 1. 0,97). A Citadel 
and trees in sunset light. 

22 (84513V Job. Basil Grundmann (German School , XVIII. cent.). 
An old clothes shop. (W.; h. 0,41, 1. 0,51). The proprietress is showing a 
second hand costume to a customer. On the walls are hanging old clothes 
and weapons. 

23 (845831. Netherland School, XVII. cent. (Sketch). A laughing 
peasant, wearing a broad brimmed hat, holds a sheet of music in his 
hand. (C.; h. 0,63, 1. 0,55). 

24 (83813). Ditto. Jesus and the Centurion, who kneels at His feet, 
soliciting pity. They are surrounded by spectators. (C.; h. 0,44, 1. 0,61). 

25. Ditto. Landscape with figures. (C.; h. 0,85, 1. 1,15). 

26 (84585). Joh. Basil Grundmann. Cobblers. (W. ; h. 0,41, 1. 0,51). 
Between two men at work in the shop is a woman busy winding thread. 
Dated : GRUNDMANN 1760. 

27(81542) Netherland School, XVII. cent. Portt ait of an old man 
yawning over his books. (C.; h. 0,79, 1. 0,64). 

28 (83811). Ditto. Jesus and the woman taken in adulteiy, who has 
fallen on her knees before Him. (C.; h. 0,43, 1. 0,61). 

29 (84499). David de Honing. Dogs hunting: rabbits. (C.; h. 1,24, 
1. i,73). 

30 (84515). The Same. Dogs and dead game. (C.; h. 1,24, 1. 1,73). 

31 (84539). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Worship of the Golden 
Calf. (W.; h. 0,35, 1. 0,45). The image is on a pedestal. The crowd are 
on their knees around it. 

32 (83796). Ditto. The Madonna and Child with the little St. John 
who brings forward a lamb for the infant Jesus to stroke. (C. ; h. 0,77, 
1. 0,65). 

33 (84462). Peter Brueghel , called BRUEGHEL THE ELDER (* Brue- 
ghel near Breda 152411525, t Brussels 1569). Winter landscape. (W.; 
h. 0,37, 1. 0,56). Low huts clustering on the banks of a frozen river on 
which people are seen skating. 

34. Netherland School, XVII. cent. A public holiday. (C. ; h. 0,53, 
I. 1,04). 

XXI. Foreign Schools, XVI.-XVIII. Century. 

1 (84519). Paul Bril's School (XVII. cent.). Landscape. (Cr.; h. 0,24, 
1. 0,30). 

2 (84523). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Battle scene. (W.; h. 0,32- 
1. 0,44). 

3 (84559). Adrian van de Velde (* Amsterdam 1636, t 1672). Land- 
scape with cows and a peasant woman riding. (C.; h. 0,33, 1. 0,43). 

4 (84582). Netherland School, XVII. cent. A lady and gentleman 
hawking. Sunset light. (C ; h. 0,92, 1. 1,18). 

5 (84533). Bonaventura Peeters (* Antwerp 1614 , t Hoboken 1652). 
Seascape. (W.; h. 0,55, 1. 0,87). Sailors are busy around a boat in the 
foreground, further off along the shore are fishermen. 

6 (84512). Johann Basil Grundmann. A vegetable seller seated at the 



First Floor 



door of her house. (W.; h. 0,42, 1. 0,33). Beside her is a woman with a 
child on her shoulders. In the background may be seen tight-rope 
dancers. (Dated 1760). 

7 (84562). Nikolaus van Eyck (* Antwerp 1617, f 1679). Landscape 
with peasants dancing. (C.; h. 0,86, 1. 1,18). 

8 (84555). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape with cows. (C.; 
h. 0,53, ' 0,69)- 

9. Ditto. Deer hunt. (W. ; h. 0,14, 1. 0,22). Riders and dogs drive a 
stag into a narrow pass. 

10 (84584). Johann Basil Grundmann. An old man sharpening a saw. 
Dated 1758. (W.; h. 0,41, 1. 0,32). 

11 (83982). Peter Paul Rubens (?) (* Siegen in Westfalia 1577, f Ant- 
werp 1640). Sketch for the head of a monk. (W.; h. 0,35, 1. 0,32). (Fig. 149). 

12 (84586). Johann Basil 
Grundmann. The spinner. 
(W.; h. 0,42, 1. 0,32). 

13 (84541). Adam Franz 
van der Meulen (* Brussels 
1632, f Paris 1690). A milita- 
ry camp. (C.; h. 1,46, 1. 1,96). 

14 (83815). Unkndwn Mas- 
ter, XVII. cent. Landscape 
with mythological figures. 
(C.; h. o,5o, 1. 0,75). 

15. Netherland School, 
XVI I . cent. Ruins , beside 
which some peasants are at- 
tending an open air celebra- 
tion of Mass. (C.: h. 0,52, 
1. o,66V 

16 (84514). Johann Basil 
Grundmann. An auctioneer 
explaining the points of a 
picture to a group of specta- 
tors. (W.; h. 0,42, 1. 0,33). 

17 (84528). Bonaventura 
Peeters. Storm at sea with 
three ships in danger of ship- 
wreck. (W.; h. 0,42, 1. 0,33). 

18 (84557). Heinrich Ambrosius Paex (of Amsterdam). A military Ho- 
liday. (C.; h. 0,85, 1. 1,48). Soldiers and peasants dancing and wandering 
about amongst the salesmen's booths. Signed: H. PAX. 1632. 

19 (84484). Hendrik met de Bles, called CIVETTA (* Bouvignes 1480, 
t Luettich ? after 1521). Landscape. (W.; h. 0,25, 1. 0,36). 

20 (84459). The Same. Storm at Sea. (W.; h. 0,27, 1. 0,41). 

21 (84449). Netherland School, XVI. cent. A Beleaguered City. (W. ; 
h. 0,36, 1. 0,43). Soldiers prepare to attack the town in which fire has al- 
ready broken out. In the sky appears some deity in a car drawn by lions. 

22 (84450). Hendrik met de Bles, called CIVKTTA. Wooded Landscape. 
(W.; h. 0,20, 1. 0,33). 

23 (84446). In the manner of Bles (XVI. cent.). Landscape. (W. ; h. 
0,19, 1. 0,27). 




Fig. 149. Sketch for the head ol a monk, 
by P. P. Rubens (Phot. Brogi). 



Picture Gallery 199 



24 (84455). Hendrik met de Bles, called CIVETTA. Landscape with 
Moses and the burning bush. (W.; h. 0,56, 1. 0,70). 

25 (84147). David Vinck-Boons (* Malines 1578, f Amsterdam 1629). 
Public Holiday outside a town. (W. ; h. 0,49, 1. 0,69). Men and women 
feasting, dancing and wandering about in a large open space, with a 
church in the background. 

26 (84488). Hendrik met de Bles, called CIVETTA. Landscape with 
hills and villages. (W.; h. 0,27, 1. 0,42}. 

27 (84458). The Same. Landscape with rocks and hills. (W.; h. 0,34, 
1. 0,50). 

28 (84445). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape with rocks and 
hills. (C.; h. 0,36, 1. 0,43). 

29. Flemish School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,98, 1. 1,38). 
A group of dancers in the foreground, on the right, with a castle on 
the hill above them. 

30 (84506). Adrian van Ostade's School (XVII. cent.). A violinist. (W.; 
h. 0,23, 1. 0,18). 

31 (84558). Ditto. Cardplayers in a' tavern. (W.; h. 0,25, 1. 0,27). 

32 (84495). Ditto. A fiddler. (C.; h.,o,2i, 1. 0,17). 

33 (84580). Sebastian Vranckx (* Antwerp 1573, t 1547). The Villa 
Medici at Rome. (W.; h. 0,59, 1. 1,05). The principal building is on the 
right, the gardens are crowded with people. Dated : 1615. 

34 (84085). Unknown Master of the XVI. cent. Portrait of Erasmus 
of Rotterdam. (C.; h. 1,00, 1. 0,79. Dated 1534). 

35 (84560). Karel du Jardin (* Amsterdam 1622, -( Venice 1678). Shep- 
herd with flocks. (W.; h. 0,33, 1, 0,24). 

36 (84581). Netherland School, XVII. cent. Bridge over a river, on 
which are countless small boats. (W.; h. 0,14, 1. 0,22), On the left is a 
gothic church. 

37. Ditto. Temptation of St. Anthony. (W.; h. 0,18, 1. 0,23). 

38 (84550). Anton van Dyck's School (XVII. cent.) (Sketch). Portrait 
oj an old man. (W.; h. 0,45, 1. 0,34). The head is turned to the left. 

39 (84494). Phllipp Wouwermann (* Haarlem 1619, t 1668). Landscape 
with a white horse. (W.; h. 0,26, 1. 0,21). 

40 (84509). Adam Elsheimer(?) (* Frankfort 1578, \ probably in Rome 
1620). The rape of Ganymede. (Cr. ; h. 0,41, 1. 0,53). On the right are 
shepherds with dogs. The eagle hovers above on the left. 

41 (84546). The Same. Ariadne forsaken, stretching out her arms in 
the direction of the fast disappearing ship. (Cr.; h. 0,40, 1. 0,52). 

42 (84045). French School, XVIII. cent. Military Camp. (C.; h. 0,79, 
1. 0,91). Several riders halting before one of the tents; on the left are a 
band of prisoners. 

43 (84504). Adam Elsheimer (?). Theseus and Ariadne. (Cr.; h. 0,41, 
1. 0,53). He drags her reluctantly into the water. 

44 (84503). Dutch School XVII. cent. Portait of a nobleman. (C.; h. 
0,77, 1. 0,12). 

45 (84035). Peter Mignard (* Troyes 1612, t Paris 1695). Head of a 
prelate. (C.; h. 0,39, 1. 0,31). 

46 (84574). Jan Victors (* Amsterdam 1620, t n a journey 1676). 
Portrait of an unknown woman dressed in white with coloured sleeves 



200 First Floor 

and adorned with pearls. (W.; h. 0,64, 1. 0,42). She is painted full - face 
with a slight squint. 

47 (81507). School of Peter Paul Rubens (XVII. cent. (Sketch). Head. 
(W.; h. 0,49, 1- 0,38). 

48 (84543). Jakob Jordaens (* Antwerp 1593, f 1678). Christ on his 
way to Golgotha with the two thieves. (C.; h. 1,36, 1. 2,06). He is bent 
under the weight of the cross. In the crowd is a youth on a white 
horse wearing a turban. 

49, 51, 52 (81493, 84498, 84540). Adam Elsheimer (?). The story of Ica- 
rus. (Cr.; h. 0,41, 1. 0,53). His flight, fall and burial. Beautiful landscape. 

50 (84497). Jakob Gerritsz Gupy, Dutch School. (* Dortrecht 1594, 
t 1651-2). Portrait of a lady. (W.; h. 0,69, 1. 0,55). 

53 (84061). Joseph Vernet (* Avignon 1712, f Paris 1789). Stormy Sea. 
(C.; h. 0,74, 1- 0,98). 

54 (84554). Copy of Anlon van Dyck. (Sketch). Head of an old man. 
(W.; h. 0,45, I- 0,34). 

55 (84505). Philipp Wouwerman. Landscape with peasants and horses. 
(W.; h. 0,25, 1. 0,18). 

56 (84524). Manner of Jacob Cortpis, called IL BORGOGNONE. Rattle 
scene. (C.; h. 0,28, 1. 0,38). On the right are a company of archers. On 
the left cavalry. Amongst them a rider on a white horse. In the distance 
are towers. 

57. Peter Meert, .called PIETRO MERA. (Flemish School, from 1600- 
1630). Venus on her couch with Cupid beside her. (W.; h. 0,25, 1. 0,35). 

58 (84518) Manner of Jacob Cortois, called IL BORGOGNONE. Battle 
scene. (C.; h. 0,28, 1. 0,38). A rider between two monks, one of whom 
holds a cross over a wounded soldier. 

59 (84547). Aert van der Neer (* Amsterdam or in Gorinchen 1603, 
t Amsterdam 1677). A crowd of skaters with a richly adorned sleigh in 
their midst. (C.; h. 0,97, 1. 1,22). 

60. Netherland School, XVII. cent. Landscape. (C.; h. 0,98, 1. 1,25). 
A military camp next to the ruins of a castle. 

XXII. Room of Brueghel. 

1 (84485). School of Roger de la Pasture, called VAN DHR WEVDEN 
(* Tournay 1399, t Brussels 1464). The burial of Christ. (W.; h. 0,82, 
1. 0,83). The dead body is carried by Nicodemus and Joseph of Arima- 
thia. The Madonna kneels on the left and Magdalene on the right be- 
tween the two Marys. Angels float above with the instruments of His 
passion. 

2 (84476). Lucas Kranach the elder (* Kronach in Franken , 1472 
t Weimar 1553). Christ and the woman taken in adultery. (W.; h. 0,55, 
' >75)- He holds her by the hand, a large crowd has assembled. 

3 (84477). Gerard David's School (XVI. cent.). Portrait of a young 
woman in black, with a white hood on her head, carrying a tiny dog. 
(W.; h. 0,52, 1. 0,37). 

4 (84439). Joos van der Beke, called MASTER OK THE DEATH OF MARV 
(* Cleve or Antwerp 1485, t 1525). Adoration of the magi. Triptych. (W.; 
h. 1,17, 1. 0,40, h. 1,17, 1. 0,93 h. 1,17, I. 0,40). The oldest of the 
three kneels to kiss the child's hand. The other two stand on either 
side. On the back the Annunciation is pointed in chiaro oscura. 



Picture Gallery 



5 (84454). Dutch School, XV. cent. St. fohn the Baptist admonishing 
Herod and his wife in the presence of their courtiers. (W. h. 0,59, 
1. 0,45). I" the distance is seen the baptism of Christ. 

6 (84475). German School, XV. cent. The burial of Christ. (W. ; h. 
0,54, 1. 0,72). Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathia carry the body, fol- 
lowed by St. John, Mary and Magdalene. 

7 (84386). Pieter Brueghel, called BRUEGHEL THE ELDER. An allegory 
bearing the inscription : Om dat de Werelt is soe ongetru, Daer om 
gha ie in den ru. (Temp, on C.; h. 0,88, 1. 0,88). 

8 (84490). The Same. The parable of the blind leading the blind. 
(Temp, on C.; h. 0,86, 1. 1,51)- In a grey autumnal landscape they go 
one behind the other; the front one, falling over a precipice, brings 
all the others to grief after him. (Fig. 150). 



B 




Fig. 150. The parable of the blind leading the blind, of P. Brueghel 
(Phot. Brogi). 

9 (84478). French School, XVI. cent. Portrait of a prince wearing a 
short cloak. (W.; h. 0,34, 1. 0,25). Dated : 1526. 

10 (84463). Hendrik met de Bles' School (XVI. cent.). Christ led to 
execution dy soldiers (W.; h. 0,52, 1. 0,36). On the right in the back- 
ground can be seen one of the thieves similarly guarded. 

11 (84474). German School, XVI. cent. Portrait of a bnarded prince 
wearing a short cloak. (W.; h. 0.39, 1. 0,32). Dated: 1526. 

12 (84467). Jakob Kornelisz (* Oastzanem before 1470, t Amsterdam 
before October i8th 1533 ). Adoration of the infant Jesus. ( W. ; h. 
1,22, 1. 1,79). Joseph and Mary kneel on either side of the Babe in a 
richly decorated shed, the frie/e of which is composed of music making 
angels. Behind the Virgin is St. Andrew with a group of devout men 
headed by the donor, all kneeling. On the other side is St. Margaret 
with a community of pious women , in the forefront of whom is the 
founder of their order. In the background is the sea covered with ships. 
This picture is the Artist's masterpiece and the finest in the room, the 



202 First Floor 

figure of St. Margaret is particularly excellent but amongst the kneel- 
ing figures are many exceedingly lifelike. (Fig. 151). 

13 (84479). Bernardo Strigel (?) (* Memmingen 1461, t about 1528). 
Portrait of Charles y. in the flower of his youth, wearing a black cap 
and the order of the Golden Fleece. (W.; h. 0,36, I. 0,25). 

14 (84451). Konrad Witz (* Basle about 1398, f about 1447). Holy 
Conversation. (W.; h. 0,62, 1. 0,41). The virgin seated in a gothic church 
is reading a book which the Christ child is fingering. St. Joseph is on 
her left. 

15 (84473). German School , XV. cent. Portrait of Maximilian I. 
turning to the left anfl wearing a plumed cap. (W.; h. 0,37, 1. 0,30). 

16 (84489). Joos van der Beke , called THE MASTER OK THE DEATH 
OF MARY. The Crucifixion. Triptych. (W.: h. 0,89, I. 0,25 h. 0,91, 




Fig. 151. Adoration of the infant Jesus, by Jakob Kornelisz 
(Phot. Anderson). 

1. 0,58 h. 0,89, 1. 0,25). Magdalene kneels at the foot of the cross be- 
tween Mary and St. John. On the right is St. Margaret with the found- 
ress and her daughters : on the left St. Jerome , the founder and his 
sons. Above on both wings are the arms of the founder and on the back 
the Annunciation is depicted in chiaro oscura. 

XXIII. Tapestry Room. 

1. Two silk embroidered Hangings. (End of XVII. or beginning of 
XVIII. cent., produced in Naples) representing statues of the nine muses 
set up on the balustrade of a hall with pillars. The names from right to 



Picture Gallery 



left are: Euterpe, Melpomene, Terpsichore, Thalia, Erato, Calliope, Ura- 
nia, Clio and Polyhymnia. 

On the table to the right : 

2 (10522). Statuette of a nude woman with helmet and shield, XVII. 
century. 

3 (10523). The farnese bull, Bronze, XVII. cent., see p. 33. No. 260. 

4 (10623). Statuette of Perseus with a sword and gorgon head. 
XVII. cent 

On the table to the left : 

5 (10786). Venus and Cupid. Bronze. Fountain Ornament, XVII. cent. 

6 (10532). Cain and Abel. Bronze. XVII. cent. 

7 (10647). Venus and Cupid. Bronze. Fountain Ornament, XVII. cent. 

XXIV. Room of small bronzes. 

Exhibited in various cases around the walls are the most impor- 
tant objects of art in this collection ; the dark blue Fa6nza ware dishes 
with coats of arms on them, representing lilies and a cardinals hat, 
originally the property of the Farnese family, as were the white majo- 
lica plates in the first case on the left of the entrance. Of these, the 
largest from Castelli in the Abruzzi is painted with scenes from the 
Massacre of the Holy Innocents, another shows Venus with her train 
of followers. The specimens of crystal adorned with figures are the 
work of Giovanni de Bernardi de Castelbolognese. 

In the three cases on the right are valuable plaques and me- 
dallions. In the centre case in the ist. division are works by Vittore 
Pisano (of Verona, * 1380, f I45 6 )- Cristoforo di Geremia (of Mantua, 
* 1430 , t 1473 ?) and G. F. Enzola, called Gianfrancesco Parmense (of 
Parma, 1458-1475). In the 2nd. division Matteo de Pasti (of Verona 1446- 
1460). Bartolomeo Savelli, called Sperandio (of Mantua, * 1430, t 1500). 
Battista Elia (of Genoa, 1480) and the so called Artist of the Orpheus le- 
gend (End of XV. cent.). In the 3rd. division: Antonio del Pollaiolo (of 
Florence, * 1429, t 1498) Donatello's School (XV. cent.), Andrea Guaz- 
zalotti, called Andrea Pratense (of Prato, * 1435, t H95)> Giovanni Fio- 
rentino, (1470-1516 ?). In the 4th. division: Various Italian masters of 
the XV. cent. In the left hand corner case: ist. division: B. Miglioli 
(of Mantua, * 1448, t 1514?), Vittore Gambello, called Camelio (of Ve- 
nice, 1484-1523), Nicola de Boni (1580-1592), Francesco da Sangallo (of 
Florence, 1494-1576), Filippino Lippi (of Prato, 1458-1504), Francesco 
Francia (of Bologna, 1450-1518), Galeazzo Mondella (of Verona), and. 
Division: Ulocrino, (End of XV. cent.), Andrea Briosco, called il Riccio 
(Padua, 1470-1532), Ambrogio Foppa, called il Caradosso (of Mondonico 
near Como, 1452-1526), Moderno (1535 in Rome). 3rd. division : Valeric 
Belli, called il Vincentino (of Vicenza, 1468-1546). 4-th division: Giovanni 
de Bernardi (of Castel Bolognese, 1496 1533). In the right hand corner 
are the works of various Italian schools of the XVI. and XVII. cents., 
imitators of the antique of the XV., XVI. and XVII. cents., and foreign 
schools of the XV. and XVI. cents. 

On the other side of the room in the centre case the following 
objects are noteworthy : Top Shelf. A small ivory pillar on which four 
bishops are carved. The top part and base of the pillar are of wood, 
the latter carved with the opening words of the gospel according to St. 
John. IV. cent. Byzantine work. Three saints in a small rectangular 



204 First Floor 

panel. Episcopal crook of copper inlaid with gold on enamel, ending 
in a snake's head, adorned with the representation of St. Michael, 
defeating the dragon (10420). Many bronze and gilt crucifixes of orien- 
tal workmanship. The good shepherd enthroned at the top of a hill, in 
ivory. Hanging up are : a carved ivory representing St. Paul and two 
other saints. Bronze incense burner with a lion, in the centre of whose 
back the chain was attached. Limoges enamel representing the three 
wise men out of the east (10417). Bronze lamps of the XI. cent. Carved 
ivory representing the crucifixion (10898). Bronze bell with twelve long 
teeth bent inward from the rim. On the second shelf: Christ on the 
cross between Mary and John, carved ivory. Portrait of the Virgin sur- 
rounded by two circles of saints and angels. Wooden Medallion. Judith 
with the head of Holofernes in relief on a gold ground. A tiny temple 
containing a bust of Christ, silver gilt ; on the base is engraved : Pater 
Stefanus me fecit fieri, and at the back the name of the maker. Nico- 
laus nepos filius Nicolai honetis fecit. A small panel in fifteen divisions 
carved with scenes from the lives of Mary and Jesus. In the centre are 
the Virgin and Child. Such souvenirs were often brought back by 
pilgrims from the Holy Land. 

Three enamels and three needlework pictures, the former falsely 
attributed to Leonard Limousin represent the nativity, crucifixion, and 
Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene after his resurrection. The silk 
and gold thread depict the garden of the seven Christian virtues, Jesus 
between Herod and Pontius Pilate and Judas with Caiaphas. Metal 
triptych with portraits of saints. Gilt chalices adorned with angels and 
saints. Wooden casket painted with saints. A metal bust of Christ in 
relief against a gothic wooden bickground. The death of the Virgin, 
carved wood. Triptych of carved ivory respresenting scenes in the life 
of the Virgin. Wooden Diptych in the shape of a book, representing 
saints. Fastened to the back wall are two bronze enamelled dishes with 
portraits of saints. 

On the third shelf: 

Bronze statuette of Marsyas, XV. cent. Bronze statuette of David, 
a beautiful specimen of the work of Antonio del Pollaiuolo (Florence 
1429-1498), to whom the Marsyas is falsely ascribed. Below are bronze 
lamps, copies of the antique, various animals also of bronze and the 
head of a youth reminiscent of one of the sons in the famous Laocoon 
statue. 

In the left hand corner cupboard: on the top shelf are several bron- 
zes scarcely worthy of notice. On the second shelf: a small agate vase 
set in gilt metal and ornamented with enamel and precious stones. A 
crucifix and cylinder of ivory (end of XVI. cent.). Ivory statuette of 
Neptune, XII. cent. Bronze relief, representing the flight into Egypt, a 
fine specimen of XVI. cent., work from Parma. Christ at the Pillar, 
carved ivory, XVI. cent. 

On the third shelf: 

Head of a dwarf, XV. cent. ; work ascribed to the so-called Master 
of the Marble Madonnas. A seated male figure after the manner of 
Riccio, from Padua at the end of the XV. cent. Four bronze statuettes 
of the goddess Venus. The first early XVI. cent, from Mantua. The 
and. after the Manner of Riccio at the same period. The 3rd. probably 
an early work by John of Bologna. The 4th. from the studio of Antico 
in Mantua, XVI. cent. Bronze statuette of Cleopatra by Baccio Ban- 
dinelli (1493-1560). Bronze statuette of Marsyas, a replica of the work 
by Antico, XVI. cent. Bronze statuette of a man serving as a support, 



Picture Gallery 205 



school of Michel Angelo, XVI. cent. Bronze statuette of Hercules by an 
unknown artist from Padua towards the end of the XVI. cent. 

In the right hand corner cupboard, on the second shelf are : An 
ivory relief of a warrior between two female figures representing virtues. 
Two ivory statuettes of warriors. St. Praesepium and St. Sebastian in 
high relief, ivory, XVII. cent. Head of Christ in wood, XVII. cent. 
Oval dish of horn and ivory, decorated round the rim with eight my- 
thological scenes and in the centre with a relief of Perseus, in the act 
of slaying the Gorgon. XVI. cent. Ivory cylinder representing a cavalry 
encounter. 

On the third shelf: a seated figure as a lamp. In the manner of 
John of Bologna, XVI. cent. Below, bronze head of an old man with a 
beard. XVI. cent. Four music making putti of bronze; the work of Nic- 
colo Roccatagliata, XVI. cent. 

Jn the cupboard to the right of the entrance door, on the second 
shelf: 

A vase of coloured stone adorned on one side with a lions head 
with rams horns. Two amber candlesticks inlaid at the base with car- 
ved ivory scenes from the passion. Decorated Vases of Horn and Ivory. 
A small bronze oven in the shape of a tower. On the third shelf: A 
small solid silver statue of Charles III. of Bourbon, XVIII. cent. Below : 
small bronze equestrian statuette, probably one of the Farnese princes. 

The corner cupboard to the left of the entrance to the Drawing 
Room contains Persian, Indian, Mexican, Japanese and Chinese works 
of art. A large egg shaped basket and two fans of very fine carved 
ivory with Chinese figures and landscape are especially remarkable. 
Amongst the smaller objects shewn the Japanese caricatures and carvings 
made froom roots of trees are noteworthy. Indian and Japanese deities 
are represented in countless profusion. On the left of the bottom shelf 
is a bronze vase covered with a fine network of ornament, one handle 
ends in the head of an old man. It is an interesting work and dates 
from the XII. cent. 

XXV. Drawing Room. 

(It is not possible to give a catalogue of the drawings exhibited in 
the show cases, as they are so often changed. Those shewn on the 
walls are numbered as usual from the right of the entrance door). 

1. Frame containing nine drawings of the Neapolitan School of the 
XVII. and XVIII. cents. The first and third in the bottom row are 
sketches by Mattia Preti for the church of St. Domenico Soriano. The 
Solimena drawing in the middle of the top row is a sketch for No. 8 
in Room XVI. 

2. Three frames containing drawings of the Bolognese Schools of 
the XVI. and XVII. cents. 

3 (86655). Raffaello Santl. Hoi? Family (h. 1,30, 1. 1,10). A worked 
up sketch. See No. 17. Room XIV. 

4 (86687). Michelangelo Buonarotti. Three warriors (h. 2,55, 1. 1,50). 
Worked up sketch for the picture of the crucifixion of St. Paul in the 
Cappella Paolina in the Vatican. 

5 (86653). Raffaello Santi. Moses at the Burning Bush (h. 1,30, 1. 1,36). 
Sketch for the fresco in. the Third Stanza in the Vatican. 

6 (86654). Alessandro Allori, called IL BRONZING. Cupid and a Bac- 
chante, see No. 14 in Room VIII. (H. 1,30, I. 2,12). 



206 First Floor 

7. A frame containing seven architectural drawings. 

8). A frame containing sixteen drawings by various Italian artists. 

The red chalk drawing in the centre of the bottom row is by Andrea 
del Sarto and falsely attributed to Jacopo da Pontormo. The two sheets 
next to it are from Tintoretto's studio. 

9 (10512). Bronze bust of Antinous, represented as Dionysus, XVI. 
century. 

10 (10514). Marble bust of Paolo III. Farnese made by Guglielmo 
della Porta (Milan 1516-1577) in the year 1543. Eight symbolical designs 
in white marble are let into the cloak of oriental alabaster. 

11 (10521). Marble bust of Paolo III. Farnese also by Guglielmo della 
Porta made in the year 1546 and similar to No. 10 but for the absence 
of the white marble relief work on the alabaster cloak. 

12 (10511). Bronze bust of a youth (end of the XVI. cent.). 



If? 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory. 



In this abridged edition, descriptions of items marked with an aste- 
risk (*) are omitted; they will be found in the detailed Italian edition men- 
tioned in the Preface. 

Roman numerals are used to indicate the room of the Pinacothek. 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 

of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


3i 


66 1 


1019 


3i8 


1775* 


1949* 


IOO* 


383* 


1020 


329 


1805 


1925 


135 


914 


IO2I 


3i6 


1990 


1947 


177* 


356* 


IO22 


333 


1991* 


95* 


178* 


362* 


1023* 


419* 


2069 


1952 


181* 


349* 


1029* 


342* 


2099 


512 


184 


399 


1031* 


340* 


2231 


947 


187 


950 


1033* 


417* 


2317 


335 


237* 


366* 


1035 


924 


2324* 


343* 


238* 


419* 


1036 


328 


2326* 


344 


318* 


352* 


1037 


1094 


2338 


398 


319 


406 


1038* 


384* 


234 


393 


382* 


359* 


1040* 


385* 


2341 


392 


387* 


357* 


1042* 


347* 


2342 


390 


389* 


355* 


1043* 


386* 


2343 


394' 


43 


922 


1046 


404 





388 


432* 


364* 


1047 


403 


2344 


396 


450* 


417* 


1048 


410 


2346 


395 


465* 


461* 


1049 


412 


2348 


389 


632* 


374* 


1052 


413 


2380* 


1950* 


634* 


372* 


1053 


400 


2392 


9'7 


765 


407 


1054 


411 


2400 


4 


879* 


377* 


i55 


401 


2401 


5 


884 


399 


1059 


418 


2404 


"77 


975 


705 


1061* 


361* 


2405 


41 


976 


928 


1063 


425 


2419 


1974 


980 


319 


1064* 


415* 


2421 


972 


981 


706 


1065 


365 


. 2422 


971 


983* 


360* 


1068 


325 


2428 


212 


984* 


358* 


1069 


337 


2439 


966 


985* 


354* 


1070 


336 


2446 


10 


986 


414 


1072 


321 


2447 


II 


987 


368 


1074 


402 


245 


09 


999 


338 


1076* 


35i* 


2451 


13 


IOOO 


334 


1078 


339 


2452 


21 


IOOI 


322 


1088* 


353* 


2453 


17 


IOO2 


332 


1095* 


363* 


2454 


18 


1003 


317 


1096* 


1383* 


2457 


19 


1004 


315 


1107 


383 


2458 


222 


1007* 


419* 


1150 


1496 


2459 


223 


1016 


326 


1535 


1917 


2480 


162 


1017 


331 


1626 


1378 


2481 


1161 



208 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


2487 


164 


3236 


724 


3721* 


787* 


2488 


164 


3237 


744 


3722* 


781* 


2501-2521 


193 





'950 


3723* 


776* 


2522 


194 


3239 


r 954 


3724* 


780* 


2523 


198 





1242 


3726* 


757* 


2 5M-2533 


199 


3240 


. 1975 


3727* 


54* 


2 554 


204 


3245 


1244 


3728* 


760* 


2561 


189 


3248 


1243 


3729* 


758* 


2562 


190 


3251 


1976 


373i* 


61* 


2565 


75 


3252 


1955 


3732* 


55* 


2568 


192 


5253 


1959 


3733* 


56* 


2569 


191 


3254 


1956 


3734* 


52* 


2595 


165 


3255 


1960 


3735* 


53* 


2596 


1 66 





36 


3736* 


62* 


2597 


170 


3256 


1957 


3738* 


12* 


2604 


168 





75 


3738* 


779* 


2606 


167 


3257 


43 


3739* 


961* 


2608 


83 


3259 


747 


3740* 


766* 


2609 


89 


3264 


746 




35* 


2610 


90 


3272 


1245 


3741 


72* 


2612 


1169 


3275 


748 


3742* 


46* 


2632 


H73 


3276 


1247 


3743* 


767* 


2633 


1172 


3279 


73 


3744* 


77-* 


2634 


I '73 


3295 


1290 


3745* 


955* 


2641 


1179 


3298 


725 


3746* 


772* 


2643 


1180 


3368* 


1947* 


3747* 


763* 


2644 


1176 


3385 


750 


3749* 


777* 


2648 


1184 


3417* 


1951* 


3750* 


764* 


2659 


1181 


3459 


1248 


3751* 


768* 


2660 


1182 


3460 


1249 


3752* 


66* 


2661 


1183 


3512* 


1951* 


3753* 


953* 


2868* 


1950* 


3614 


6 


3754* 


956* 


2873* 


1949 


3615 


1254 


3755* 


960* 


2884 


1948* 


3625 


1251 


3756* 


958* 


2890 


1977 


3629 


727 


3757* 


25* 


2910* 


1951* 


3630 


1215 


3758* 


67* 


2929 


704 


3633 


1724 


3759* 


769* 


2991 


1977 


3663* 


952* 


3765 


909 


2992 


1977 


374 


1234 


3771 


1225 


2998 


1196 


3708* 


753* 


3815 


1226 


3002 


583 


3709* 


957* 


3817 


1227 


3005 


"74 


3710* 


954* 


3821 


1228 


3014 


1240 


37H* 


962* 


3822 





3>i5 


- "75 


3712* 


798* 


3829 


1233 


3 25 


1241 


37 '3* 


794* 


3840 


QI3 


3>3o 


726 


37M* 


792* 


3847 


1229 


3203 


745 


37 '5* 


786* 


3848 


87 


3212 


729 


3716* 


795* 


3852 


1232 


3213 


728 


3717* 


789* 


3857 


1230 


3222 


1958 


3718 


797 


3858 


1231 


3231 


1951 


3719* 


799* 


3897 


714 


3232 


'973 


3720* 


784* 


3908 


712 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



209 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


3917 


713 


4927 


1492 


5122 


1563 


3921 


1253 


4946* 


1598* 


5126* 


1604* 


3925 


73i 


4949 


i53i 


5128* 


1568* 


3927 


732 


4951* 


1597* 


5132* 


1569* 


3937* 


26* 


4989 


809 


5150* 


1608* 


3948 


1252 


4990 


806 


5180 


1532 


3955 


1236 


4991 


929 


5185 


1535 


3956 


734 


4992 


804 


5199 


1578 


3965 


735 


4993 


1648 


5216* 


1539* 


3968 


743 


4994 


825 


5142* 


1520* 


3972 


739 


4995 


836 


5260* 


1564* 


3999 


738 


4997 


832 


5264* 


i54o* 


4002 


742 


4998 


833 


5266* 


1556* 


4012 


741 


4999 


1489 


5279* 


1547* 


4024 


740 


5000 


809 


5280* 


1567* 


4027 


733 


5001 


816 


5283* 


1566* 


4029 


736 


5002 


814 


5286* 


1579* 


4038 


737 


5003 


817 


5292 


93 


4050 


749 


5004 


774 


5296 


899 


4070 


1246 


5005 


783 


53i* 


1608* 


4185 


693 


5006 


873 


5302* 





4189 


690 


5007 


869 


5303* 


1557* 


4430 


1186 


5008 


1678 


5304 


1499 


4440 


1185 


5009 


1588 


5305* 


1608* 


4463 


1187 


5010 


159 


5306* 


1608* 


452i 


1188 


5011 


872 


5313 


1592 


4563 


1649 


5012 


870 


5317* 


1589* 


4660-4674 


1209 


5013 


773 


5329 


1552 


4675-4713 


1207 


50H 


811 


5330* 


1554* 


4717 


1206 


5015 


871 


5332 


1519 


4718 


1208 


5I7 


1677 


5337 


1580 





1508 


5018 


1522 


5342* 


1585* 


4885 


854 


5019 


1521 


5362* 


1608* 


4886 


860 


5020 


867 


5363* 


1595* 


4887 


10, II 


5021 


869 


5368* 


1549* 


4888 


859 


5022* 


1586* 


5371 


M97, 


4889 


856 


5023 


875 


5372* 


1602* 


4890 


826 


5024 


1583 


5374* 


1546* 


4891 


824 


5025* 


1607* 


5396* 


1584* 


4892 


837 


5026 


1606 


5405* 


1537* 


4893 


863 


5027 


877 


5420* 


1534* 


4894 


1488 


5028 


866 


5424* 


1533* 


4895 


947 


5029 


865 


5427* 


1587* 


4896 


891 


5030 


876 


5434*-5436* 


1596* 


4897 


820 


5031 


878 


5460 


1523 


4898 


822 


5032 


868 


5465 


902 


4899 


821 


533 


874 


5466 


900 


4900 





5041* 


1581* 


5467 


893 


4901 





553* 


1593* 


5468 


894 


4902 


823 


5074-5081 


1594 


5469 


901 


493 


827 


5112* 


1548* 


5470 


896 


4904 


775 


5119* 


1538* 


5471 


895 



14 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 

of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


5472* 


1603* 


5607 


882 


5703* 


1904* 


5473* 


1605* 


5608 


850 


5710* 


1536* 


5474 


897 


5609 


788 





1904* 


5488 


1601 


5610 


855 


5711* 





5489 


1494 


5611 


75, IV 


5712* 





5490* 


1582 


5612 


759 


5715* 


1909* 


5491* 


1600 


5613 


835 


5716* 





556 


1498 


5614 


853 


5717* 





55" 


I5H 


5615 


793 


573* 


756 


5529 


1503 


5616 


879 


5735 


1904 


5530 


1507 


5617 


807 


5736* 


1905* 


5534 


1513 


5618 


857 


5744 


1906 


5535 


1500 


56i9 


847 


5746 


1907 


5536 


1526 


5620 


844 


5821 


68 


5538 


1505 


5621 


846 


5958* 


679* 


5539 


1504 


5622 


886 


5959* 


680* 


5541* 


1528* 


5623 


88 1 


5960 


7 


5543* 


1527* 


5624 


842 


596i 


10 


5547 


1515 


5625 


841 


5962 


n 


5548 


i5i; 


5626 


861 


5963* 


103 


5549 


1516 


5627 


862 


5964* 


692 


5550 


1518 


5628 


858 


5965 


14 


5553 


1525 


5629 


946 





80 


5558 


151 


5630 


831 


5966 


15 


556i 


15" 


5631 


887 





81 


5562 


I5 6 


5632 


8i3 


5968* 


691 


5568* 


1525* 


5633 


812 


5969 


16 


5569 


15" 





851 





79 


5584 


805 


5634 


883 


5970 


17 


5585 


73, IV 


5635 


803 





78 


5586 


790 


5636* 


1901* 


5973 


33 


5587 


762 


5637 


1901 


5974 


34 


5588 


885 


5638* 


1902* 


5975 


37 


5589 


785 


5639 


1902 


5976 


39 


559 


890 


5640* 


1902* 


5977 


40 





1693 


5641* 


1901* 


5978 


42 


5591 


765 


5642* 





5979 


44 


5592 


849 


5643* 





5980 


45 


5593 


796 


5644 


1899 


5983 


92 


5594 


848 


5645 





5984 


93 


5595 


802 


5647 





5987 


94 


5596 


886 


5648 





5988 


9i 


5597 


755 


5656 


1901 


5989 


663 


5598 


884 


5657 


1902 


5991 


70 


5599 


770 


5658* 


1902* 


5992* 


71 


5600 


889 


5669* 


1900* 


5993 


74 


5601 


791 


5673 


1897 


5994* 


702* 


5602 


880 


5674 




5995 


564 


5603 


852 


5683 


1903 


5996 


3* 


5604 


843 


5691* 


1905* 


5997 


121 


5605 


845 


5696* 


1909* 


5998 


1 2O 


5606 


761 


5699* 


1904* 


5999 


243 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
f catalog. 


6000 


1015 


6053 


1004 


6106* 


1068* 


6001 


280 


6054 


972 


6107 


142 


6002 


260 


6055 


971 


6m 


1841 


6003* 


H54* 


6056 


986 


6115 


666 


6004* 


U55* 


6057 


988 


6116 


77 


6005 


144 


6058 


970 


6117 


667 


6006 


no 


6059 


969 


6118 


673 


6007 


101 


6060 


968 


6119 


657 


6008 


1 06 


6061 


1010 


6120 


697 


6009 


103 


6062 


992 


6121 


137 


6010 


104 


6063 


976 


6122 


76 


6011 


146 


6064 


006 


6123 


129 


6012 


303 


6065* 


066* 


6124 


648 


6013 


301 


6066 


005 


6125 


1096 


6014 


300 


6067 


038 


6126 


"47 


6015 


302 


6068 


007 


6127 


1090 


6016 


270 


6069 


039 


6128 


1089 


6017 


251 


6070 


987 


6129 


1126 


6018 


H39 


6071 


1040 . 


6130 


1116 


6019 


269 


6072 


1025 


6131 


i"5 


6020 


3H 


6073 


246 


6132 


IIIO 


6022 


253 


6074 


990 


6i33 


1120 


6023 


113 


6075 


980 


6i34 


I 125 


6024 


133 


6076 


1027 


6i35 


1 123 


6025 


1084 


6077 


1036 


6136 


1III 


6026 


277 


6078 


1029 


6i37 


5, V.-Z. 


6027 


247 


6079 


985 


6138 


276 


6028 


1085 


6080 


991 


6i39 


1109 


6029 


977 


6081 


984 


6140 


1 121 


6030 


983 


6082 


1034 


6141 


1087 


6031 


982 


6083 


48 


6142 


T088 


6032 


1026 


6084 


1043 


6i43 


ma 


6033 


979 


6085* 


1064* 


6144 


"37 


6034 


295 


6086 


1060 


6146 


"33 


6035 


294 


6087* 


1058* 


6147 


1141 


6036* 


75 J * 


6088 


989 


6148 


"51 


6037* 


752* 


6089* 


1059* 


6149 


1146 


6038 


994 


6090 


1035 


6150 


"44 


6039 


ton 


6091 


1041 


6151 


"53 


6040 


965 


6092 


981 


6152 


"43 


6041 


998 


6093 


1032 


6153 


1142 


6042* 


10670* 


6094 


1037 


6164 


"38 


6043 


966 


6095 


1028 


6i55 


1140 


6044 


997 


6096 


1044 


6156 


1148 


6045 


996 


6097* 


1071* 


6i57 


"34 


6046 


967 


6098 


1070 


6158 


1158 


6047 


5 


6099* 


1062* 


6i59 


1117 


6048 


995 


6100* 


1063* 


6160 


"23 


6049 


IOOO 


6102 


1033 


6161 


1 1 24 


6050 


1001 


6103* 


1065* 


6162 


1136 


6051 


1017 


6104 


59 


6163 


1114 


6052 


964 


6105 


IMS 


6164 


148 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


6167 . 


60 


6239 


1129 


6292 


1872 


6168 


20 


6240 


57 


6293 


309 


6176* 


072* 


6242 


63 


6294 


948 


6178 


069 


6244 


22 


6295 


232 


6179 


075 


6245 


IIO4 


6296 


297 


6180 


IOI 


6246 


24 


6297 


310 


6181 


099 


6247* 


1056* 


6298 


926 


6182 


077 


6248 


27 


6299 


1030 


6184 


098 


6249 


58 


6300 


540 


6185 


092 


6250 


51 


6301 


233 


6186 


091. 


6252 


6 9 


6302 


607 


6187 


93 


6253 


249 


6302 


130 


6188 


149 


6254 


261 


6304 


131 


6189* 


957* 


6255 


4781 


6305 


1485 


6190 


003 


6256 


102 


6306 


273 


6192 


974 


6257 


99 


6307 


257 


6193 


014 


6258 


IOO 


6308 


219 


6194 


108 


6259 


1933 


6309 


, 1486 


6i95 


993 


. 6260 


296 


6310 


213 


6196 


234 





941 


6311 


236 


6201 


097 


6261 


135 


6312 


927 


6202 


i5 


6262 


675 


6313 


262 


6204 


1 02 


6263 


644 


6314 


1042 


6205 


IOO 


6264 


942 


6315 


5io 


6210 


15 


6265 


499 


6316 


235 


6211 


23 


6266 


939 


6317 


221 


6212 


49 





1258 


6318 


263 


6213 


59i 


6268 


506 


6319 


483 


6215 


5i8 


6269 


225 


6320 


252 


6216 


60 1 


6270 


216 


6321 


447 


6217 


528 


6271 


245 


6322 


116 


6218 


298 


6272 


217 


6323 


626 


6219 


602 


0273 


244 


6324 


H5 


6220 


603 


6274 


267 


6325 


265 


6221 


621 


6275 


279 


6326 


256 


6222 


586 


6276 


239 


6327 


501 


6223 


672 


6278 


1860 


6328 


237 


6224 


508 





665 


6329 


255 


.6225 


669 


6279 


1878 


6330 


238 


6226 


513 


6280 


670 


6331 


266 


6227 


618 


6281 


707 


6332 


264 


6228 


600 


6282 


117 


6333 


254 


6229 


1008 


6283 


312 


6335 


275 


6230 


1012 


6284 


3ii 


6339 


308 


6231 


I95 


6285 


313 


6343 


1785 


6232 


85 


6286 


307 


6345 


1788 


6233 


8 4 


6287 


1923 


6346 


1786 


6234 


88 


6288 


231 


6347 


1787 


. 6235 


86 


6289 


306 


6348 


1936 


6236 


"35 


6290 


911 


635 


250 


6237 


1131 


6291 


1031 


6351 


240 


6238 


1132 


6292 


1446 


6352 


949 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



213 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


6353 


275 


6407 


304 


6640 


572 


6354 


53 


6408 


112 


6667 


630 


6355 


278 


6409 


242 


6670 


289 


6356 


230 


6410 


2 2O 


6671 


534 


6357 


229 


6411 


218 


6672 


531 


0358 


241 


6412 


147 


6673 


283 


6359 


292 


6413 


III9 


6674 


5i6 


6360 


224 


6414 


1127 


6675 


288 


6361 


271 


6415 


1118 


6676 


535 


6362 


1 002 


6416 


107 


6677 


568 


6363 ' 


541 


6421 


97 


6678 


1050 


6364 


543 


6423 


547 


6679 


568 


6365 


542 


6425 


549 


6680 


5H 





1844 


6439 


539 


6681 


593 


6366 


544 


6484 


108 


6682 


268 


6368 


709 


6485 


109 


6683 


595 


6369 


139 


6499 


536 


6684 


526 


6370 


7IP 


6519 


1794 


6685 


596 


6371 


496 


6542 


1793 


6686 


521 


6372 


708 


6545 


546 


6687 


575 


6373 


114 


6556 


98 


6688 


578 


6374 


579 


6560 


15 


6689 


502 


6375 


500 


6566 


556 


6690 


567 


6376 


1484 ' 


6567 


557 


6691 


569 


6377 


2 


6569 


555 


66g2 


570 


6378 


227 


6575 


566 


6693 


598 


6379 


535 


6579 


655 


6694 


940 


6380 


1935 


6580 


620 


6697 


io85 


6381 


1937 


6581 


617 


6700 


1106 


6382 


1821 


6583 


646 


6701 


613 


6384 


1914 


6584 


639 


6702 


581 


6385 


677 


6585 


1021 


6703 


587 


6386 


1913 


6586 


641 


t>7o 4 


585 


6389 


1923 


6596 


647 


6705 


64 


6390 


522 


6598 


629 


6706 


689 


6391 


248 


6600 


606 


6707 


700 


6392 


259 


6601 


605 


6708 


678 


6393 


134 


6603 


I53 


6709 


676 





258 


6604-6605 


28 


6710 


674 


6394 


30 


6606 


640 


6711 


660 


6395 


132 


6007 


559 


6712 


597 


6396 


136 


6608 





6713 


272 


6397 


i 


6610-6618 





6714 


577 


6398 


32 


6619* 


565* 


6715 


149 


6399 


226 


6621 


560 


6016 


576 


6400 


515 


6624-6628 


559 


6717 


1051 


6401 


1932 


6631 


562 


6718 


1018 


6402 1483 


6633 


563 ' 


6719 


659 


6403 1938 


6634 


573 


6720 


698 


6404 228 


6637 


571 


6721 


696 


6405 35 


6638* 


564* 


6722 


594 


6406 


299 


6639 


56i 


6723 


671 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 

of catalog. 




No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


6724 


285 




6799 


635 


9000 


1359 


6725 


145 




6857 


550 


9001 


1295 


6726 


281 




6858 


55i 


9008 


1272 


6727 


138 




6859 


524 


9009 


1268 


6728 


290 




6863 


274 


9010 


1269 


6729 


1052 




6866 


13 


9012 


1386 


6732 


684 




6868 


912 


9015 


1806 


6734 


140 




6869 


1789 


9016 


1808 


6735 


682 




6870 


31 


9019 


1470 


6736 


558 




6871* 


19* 


9020 


1468 


6737 


122 




6872* 


21* 


9021 


'473 


6738 


1049 




6873* 


65* 


9022 


1471 


6739 


1048 




7643* 


1575* 


9024 


1807 


6740 


609 




8408 


1676 


9026 


1388 


6741 


6l9 




8441-8490 


1255 


9027 


1355 


6742 


6I 5 




8533 


936 


934 


1805 


6743 


610 




8562 


934 


935 


1804 


6744 


645 




8564 


933 


9037 


1803 


6745 


658 




8565 


935 


9039 


1802 


6746 


633 




8594 


839 


9040 


1397 





636 




8834 


*475 


9041 


1367 


6747 


650 




8836 


1352 


9042 


1297 


6748 


656 




8837 


1466 


943 


1383 


6749 


653 




8843 


J 34i. 


9044 


1385 


6750 


649 




8845 


J 39i 


9046 


1442 


6751 


687 




8846 


1393 


9047 


1441 


6752 


694 




8864 


1419 


9648 


H33 


6753 


1046 




8882 


1351 


9049 


1300 


6754 


627 




8886 


1338 


9050 


HH. 


6755 


628 




8889 


1426 


9051 


M39 


6756 


604 




8895 


1472 


9052 


1438 


6757 


1047 




8896 


1425 


9058 


1479 


6758 


624 




8898 


1386 


9064 


1798 


6759 


611 




8905 


1335 


9066 


1797 


6760 


651 




8919 


1347 


9067* 


1795* 


6761 


634 




8924 


1346 


9070 


1796 


6762 


683 




8968 


1400 


9071 


1800 


6763 


1046 




8976 


1316 


9089 


1265 


6764 


668 




8977 


1360 


9104 


1276 


6765 


638 




8978 


1476 


9105 


1277 


6767 


637 




8979 


1435 


9106 


1366 


6768 


612 




8980 


1299 


9107 


1282 


6770 


611 




8983 


1416 


9108 


1283 


6774 


623 




8984 


1417 


9109 


1279 


6775 


622 




8991 


1799 


9110 


1274 


6776 


18 




8992 


1319 


9111 


I3H 


6778 


284 




8993 


1358 


9112 


1278 


6779 


282 




8995 


1363 


9118 


H58 


6780 


82 




8996 


1356 


9119 


H57 


6781 


691 




8997 


1361 


9121 


M56 


6782 


688 




8998 


1364 


9124 


1407 


6787-6791 


8 




8999 


1273 


9'33 


M47 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


9141 


1395 


9455 


1462 


9989 


204 


9154 


1394 


9456 


1466 


9990 


J75 


9171 


13" 


9457 


1467 


9991 


179 


9179 


M55 


9506 


134 


9993 


181 


9180 


1403 


9508 


1339 


9994 


182 


9193 


1453 


9528 


1368 


9996 


183 


9195 


i45i 


9529 


i37o 


9996 


184 


9202 


1464 


9530 


1392 


9907 


195 


9206 


1452 


9531 


1369 


9998 


190 


9207 


1454 


9532 


H32 


9999 


191 


9211 


1376 


9534 


1427 


IOOOO 


192 


9218 


145 


9535 


1318 


I 


193 


9231 


1375 


9536 


1429 


3 


196 


9236 


1377 


9537 


i39 


4 


197 


9240 


1365 


9538 


I3i3 


5 


198 


9241 


1402 


9539 


1315 


6 


199 


9243 


H74 


9542 


1465 


7 


200 


9246 


1431 


9546 


1477 


8 


2OI 


9247 


1357 


9548 


937 


9 


205 


9248 


1362 


9549 


1444 


10 


207 


9249 


1286 


955 


1443 


ii 


2O6 


9250 


1379 


9551 


1461 


12 


208 


9251 


1348 


9553 


1259 


13 


209 


9256 


1382 


9555 


1345 


14 


2IO 


9257 


1289 


9556 


1384 


15 


151 


9261 


1331 


9557 


1374 


16 


152 


9262 


1409 


9558 


938 


17 


153 


9264 


1412 


9559 


1251 


18 


154 


9265 


1321 


9560 


1301 


19 


211 


9267 


1327 


956t 


1305 


29 


999 


9269 


H45 


9562 


1302 


109 


72, IV 


9270 


HJS 


9563 


1306 


185 





9271 


I4<>5 


9564 


I3<>3 


1 86 


78, IV 


9274 


1332 


9578 


1827 


188 





9276 


1390 


9595 


850 


199 





9278 


1410 


9596 


829 


201-204 


72, IV 


928s 


1317 


9625 


828 


214 


78, IV 


9286 


1322 


9647 


135 


226 





9295 


1448 


9774 


1813 


231 





9297 


1449 


9977 


156 


232 





9320 


1411 


9978 


157 


236-238 


72, IV 


9380 


1387 


9979 


158 


278-279 





938i 


1437 


9980 


161 


283 


78, IV 


9383 


1420 


998i 


162 


508 


57, VII 


9384 


1418 


9982 


164 


509 


12, II 


9385 


1373 





178 


5io 


76, IV 


9386 


143 


9983 


165 


5ii 


12, XXV 


9388 


I37i 


9984 


166 


512 


9, XXV 


9449 


1381 


9985 


167 


5H 


10, XXV 


9452 


1334 


9986 


168 


5i6 


46, III 


9453 


H59 


9987 


169 


517 


35, X 


9454 


1463 


9988 


170 


5i8 


32, X 



216 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


10519 


33, X 


20253* 


442* 


21580* 


440* 


520 


70, VIII 


255* 





581* 





52i 


ii, XXV 


257* 





6n* 


427* 


522 


2, XXIII 


259* 





612* 





523 


3, XXIII 


260* 





940* 


436* 


524 


23, IX 


267* 


449* 


22242 


429 


525 


13, II 


270* 





246 


430 


526 


H, II 


271* 





248 


445 


527 


44, III 


272* 





249 


446 


529 


i, V.-Z. 


282* 





280* 


1823* 


532 


6, XXIII 


285* 





294 


45i 


575 


77, IV 


286* 





295 


454 


623 


4, XXIII 


293* 





296 


431 


647 


7, XXIII 


298* 





321 


443 


709 


72, IV 


301* 


>, 


322 


444 


71 





306* 





342* 


427* 


782 


7i, VIII 


3ii* 





343* 





785 


69, VIII 


315* 





344* 





786 . 


5, XXIII 


316* 





345* 





807 


59, VII 


322* 


442* 


369* 


4 6oter* 


809 


78, IV 


328* 





38i 


457 


810 


ii, II 


331* 





382 


460 


823 


4, V.-Z. 


336* 





383 


428 


824 


34, X 


337* 





572 


923 


828 


36, VI 


342* 





573 


943 


833 


662 


353* 





574 


944 


926 


78, IV 


354* 





575 


945 


11232 


72, iv 


361* 


449* 


24224 


432 


12052* 


1831* 


366* 




225* 


440* 


549 


1716 


367* 





227 


445 


13521 


1842 


379* 





228 


452 


522* 


1843* 


380* 





230 


447 


527* 


1853* 


383* 





231 


448. 


543* 


1855* 


385* 





232 


432 


557* 


1830* 


388* 





241* 


437* 


558* 


1843* 


397* 





255* 


26ob* 


560* 


1848* 


408* 


442* 


256 


459 


564* 


1830* 


409* 


449* 


606* 


1863* 


576* 


1848* 


410* 





650* 





577* 





411* 


442* 


654* 


1870* 


578* 





412* 


449* 


655 


1868 


579* 


1830* 


413* 





668 


920 


587* 





414* 





718* 


1862* 


591* 


1848* 


415* 





720* 


1868* 


592* 


1830* 


416* 





724* 


1862* 


634* 


1854* 


524* 


450* 


826* 


1865* 


639* 





21024* 


449* 


852 


1865 


653* 


1853* 


43* 


45o* 


857* 


1863* 


688* 


1843* 


44* 





858* 


1865* 


557 


58, VII 


205* 


440* 


862* 





20247 


442 


578* 





864* 





252* 


442* 


579* 





868* 


1863* 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



217 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 




No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


24876* 


1865* 




69089 


1896 


72811* 


1746* 


882* 


1863* 




146* 


1641* 


823 


1660 


883 


1865 




167* 


1645* 


981 


1529 


887* 


1868* 




169* 


1646* 


983 


1696 


893 


1863 




174* 


1644* 


985 


1783 


894* 


1865* 




454* 


1638* 


986 


1695 


932* 


1868* 




494 


1611 


989 


1491 


938* 







498* 


1639* 


990 


1826 


972* 







762-771 


892 


991 


1490 


25000 


1862 




782 


1728 


995 


1542 


- 85* 


1859* 




784 


I7<>3 


997 


1784 


199* 


1861* 




785 


1698 


998 


1711 


222* 


1868* 




786 


1702 


73003 


1723 


223* 







787 


1701 


5 


1679 


225* 







788 


1699 


7 


1734 


234* 


1865* 




789 


1700 


9 


1735 


260* 


1871* 




795 


918 


n* 


1733* 


285* 


1876* 




816 





18 


1697 


289 


1875 




904 


1715 


27 


1685 


300 


1879 




962* 


1640* 


33 


1684 


301 






963* 





96* 


1689* 


314* 


1880*- 




70620* 


1747* 


103 


1673 


343* 


1886* 




72166 


1682 


H5 


1672 


376 


1877 




181 


1690 


117* 


1720* 


377 


1877 




191 


1675 


144 


1609 


378, 


1880 




192 


916 


145 


1653 


379 







193 





146 


1610 


380 


1876 




195 


1680 


152 


1790 


38i 







196 


1689 


153 


1792 


384* 







198 


1622 


426* 


1614* 


488* 







199 


1629 


437* 


1616* 


489* 







202* 


1619* 


439* 


i6!5* 


490 


1881 




266 


162=; 


440* 


1614* 


492* 


1877* 




2IO 


1683 


445* 





493* 







226 


1687 


450* 





494 


898 




231 


1674 


475* 





495* 


1876* 




245 


1627 


483* 





578* 


881* 




253 


1624 


491* 





579* 


885* 




254 


1626 


Sit 


1636 


629* 


892* 




255 


1621 


515* 


1650* 


699* 


879* 




284 


1627 


535* 


1635* 


8.24* 


862* 




287 


1623 


880 


1705 


27611 


858 




291 


1628 


884 


1694 


614* 


1848* 




292 


1620 





1755* 


646* 







392* 


1617* 


950* 


1779* 


655* 


1928* 




592 


1659 


95i* 


1613* 


665 


1928 




623* 


1654* 


952* 


1612* 


695 


M3 6 




624* 




74003* 


1689* 


68854 


1614 




625* 


1655* 


9* 








1647 




637* 


1656* 


28 


1714 


69077* 


1642* 




660* 


i657* 


29 





87* 


1643* 




809* 


1746* 


32 


1712 



218 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 




No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


74056 


1711 




83808 


2, XX 


83870 


49, VII 


60 


1713 




809 


6, VI 


871 


23, XI 


602* 


1726* 




810 


ii, IX 


872 


18, VI 


922 


1669 




811 


28, XX 


873 


6, XII 


75091 


1876 




812 


26, VIII 


874 


27, XI 


478* 


1725* 




813 


24, XX 


875 


20, VIII 


479 


1754 




814 


9, IX 


876 


23, VI 


480 


1753 




8^5 


15, XXI 


877 


21, XI 


537 


1751 




816 


7, IX 


878 


20, VI 


76304 


919 




817 


14, X 


879 


22, VI 


538 


1772 




818 


15, ix 


88 1 


17, XI 


540-541 


1773 




819 


16, X 


882 


13, X 


542 


1770 




821 


2, XIX 


884 


20, XI 


543 


1771 




822 


25, VIII 


886 


12, XI 


77171* 


1829* 




823 


40, VIII 


887 


5, VIII 


517 


1752 




824 


30, VII 


891 


15, XII 


608* 


1749* 




825 


20, XII 


892 - 


5, VII 


78296* 


1824* 




826 


30, VIII 


894 


50, VII 


580* 


1782* 




827 


22, XIX 


895 


35, VII 


6t3 


1738 




828 


53, VIII 


899 


16, VII 


614 


1741 




829 


12, XII 


900 


35, VII 


615 


1739 




830 


9. XII 


902 


23, XV 


616 


1740 




831 


15, xi 


93 


36, VIII 


618 


1775 




832 


3, XII 


95 


23, VIII 


622 


1774 




833 


59, VIII 


906 


25, XV 


83764 


io, IX 




834 


13, XII 


907 


3, VIII 


765 


8, IX 




835 


24, XII 


908 


3, XIII 


766 


15, X 




836 


42, VII 


909 


13, VIII 


767 


21, X 




837 


n, XII 


910 


62, VIII 


768 


21, XIX 




338 


5, XII 


911 


i, IX 


769 


44, VIII 




839 


23, XII 


912 


i, XIII 


771 


23, X 




840 


3, XI 


913 


15, XIII 


772 


37, VIII 




842 


68, VIII 


914 


14, IX 


773 


12, IX 




844 


25, XII 


915 


5, IX 


777 


45, VIII 




845 


16, XII 


916 


15, XIV 


778 


3, XV 




847 


24, VI 


917 


61, VIII 


779 


2, XIV 




848 


13, VII 


918 


20, IX 


780 


io, VIII 




851 


7, XI 


919 


9, XIII 


782 


2, XI 




852 


28, XI 


920 


16, XIII 


783 


3, XIV 




854 


14, XI 


921 


12, XIII 


784 


3i, XV 




855 


16, XI 





30, X 


785 


18, VIII 




856 


19, XII 


922 


12, XVII 


786 


12, VIII 




857 


io, XII 


923 


5, IX 


787 


17, VI 




858 


33, VIII 


924 


60, VIII 


789 


27, VIII 




859 


25, VII 




14, XIII 


790 


41, VIII 




86 1 


24, VIII 


925 


13, IX 


791 


6, XIV 




862 


22, VII 


927 


67, VIII 


796 


32, XX 




863 


18, XI 


928 


66, VIII 


80 1 


28, X 




864 


2, VIII 


929 


21, IX 


803 


30, XIX 




865 


27, VII 


930 


65, VIII 


805 


13, XIX 




866 


V>, VIII 


932 


22, XV 


806 


22, X 




869 


19, XI 


934 


47, VIII 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


83935 


56, VIII 


83990 


33, XV 


84055 


28, VIII 


937 


4, VIII 


991 


14, XII 


57" 


ii, XVIII 


938 


10, XI 


992 


21, IV 


60 


8, X 


939 


9, XIV 


993 


10, XIV 


61 


53- XXI 


940 


29, VI 


994 


3i, VI 


64 


29, IV 


941 


23, VII 


995 


13, XIV 


66 


67, IV 


942 


54, VIII 


996 


20, VII 


67 


43, VIII 


943 


24, XV 


999 


i, XI 


68 


14, VIII 


945 


6, IX 


84000 


12, XIV 


69 


63, VIII 


946 


30, XV 


i 


7, XIII 


7i 


2, XV1I1 


947 


2, IX 


2 


5, XIV 


73 


8, IV 


948 


2, XIII 


3 


48, VII 


74 


7, IV 


949 


24, X 


4 


i, XIV 


76 


70, IV 


95o 


27, X 


5 


17, XIV 


77 


9, IV 


95i 


4, IX 


7 


56, IV 


78 


28, VI 


952 


25, XI 


8 


36, IV 


80 


i, XIX 


953 


49, VIII 


9 


8, XI 


81 


26, VI 


954 


29, XV 


ii 


ii, XIII 


83 


20, IV 


955 


17, IX 


12 


34, IV 


84 


27, VI 


956 


32, XV 


13 


24, VII 


85 


34, XXI 


957 


19, XiII 


15 


5, XIX 


88 


15, VII 


958 


17, XII 


16 


50, IV 


9i 


47, VII 


959 


18, IX 


17 


33, VI 





54, VII 


960 


27, XV 


19 


6, XIII 


92 


17, VIII 


961 


51, VIII 


20 


24, XI 


93 


35, VIII 


962 


3, IX 


21 


3', VI 


94 


ii, VIII 


963 


6, XI 


22 


25, IV 


95 


40, VII 


964 


21, XI 


24 


18, XII 


96 


39, VII 


966 


58, VIII 


25 


16, VIII 


97 


31, VII 


967 


8, XVIII 


26 


2, X 


98 


4, VII 


968 


8, XIV 


27 


2, III 


101 


2, Vll 


969 


2, XII 


28 


14, XIX 


102 


17, VII 


970 


15, XIX 


2 9 


34, VIII 


103 


45, VII 


971 


5. XIII 


30 


36, VII 


105 


44, VII 


972 


i, XII 


32 


17, XIX 


1 08 


52, VII 


973 


28, XII 


33 


21, VIII 


I0 9 


22, VIII 


974 


17, XIII 


34 


13, XIII 


H3 


39, VIII 


675 


27, XII 


35 


45, XXI 


"5 


25, x 


976 


26, XII 


36 


16, XIV 


1x6 


7, VIII 


977 


20, XIV 


38 


7, XVIII 


119 


38, VIII 


978 


3, XVII 


40 


29, VIII 


1 20 


12, VII 


979 


6, XVII 


4i 


4, XIII 


122 


37, VII 


980 


9, XVII 


42 


24, XVIII 


124 


53, VII 


981 


21, VII 


43 


9, VII 


"5 


28, VII 


982 


ii, XXI 


44 


4, VI 


127 


3, X 


983 


10, XIII 


45 


42, XXI 


129 


32, VII 


984 


8, VIII 


46 


32, XVIII 


131 


i, X 


985 


43, VII 


47 


19, IX 


132 


29, X 


986 


64, VIII 


48 


16, XIX 


133 


26, VII 


988 


21, VI 


5i 


i, IV 


134 


39, IV 





ii, XIV 


52 


ii, IV 


136 


38. VII 


989 


22, XII 


53 


i, XVII 




4, XI 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 




No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 

of catalog. 


84137 


13, XV - 




84224 


8, III 


84326 


i, VI 


138 


9, 'XV 




227 


10, VII 


327 


16, XVII' 


139 


8, VII 




228 


26, III 


33i 


25, "I 


141 


4i, VII 




229 


17, III 


334 


31, XVII! 


142 


18, VII 




230 


6, IV 


335 


15, XVII 


M3 


50, VIII 




231 


6, III 


337 


20, III 


144 


55, VII 




232 


19, III 


338 


5i, IV 


H5 


5i, VII 




234 


3, IV. 


342 


35, HI 


146 


i, VII 






62, 





6, V 


H7 


6, VII 




237 


22, III 


34 6 


M, IV 


148 


55, VIII 




239 


43, 


347 


48, 


149 


29, VII 




240 


58, IV 


348 


13, XX 


i5o 


7, VII 




241 


32, HI 


349 


64, IV 


152 


ii, VII 




242 


38, 


350 


66, 


155 


33, VII 




243 


12, 


35i 


13, XVIII 


157 


46, VII 




244 


5, " 


352 


8, XVII 


158 


14, VII 




245 


30, 


353 


18, IV 


161 


19, VII 




2<l6 


42, 


354 


34, V 


163 


9, X 




248 


4, 


355 


44, 


165 


25, VI 




249 


13, 


357 


23, XVII 


1 66 


30, VI 




250 


37, 


358 


27, XVIII 


177 


48, VIII 




252 


28, 


359 


29, IV 


178 


7, VI 




253 


36, 


360 


38, V 


184 


22, XI 




254 


41, 


36i 


30, 


185 


34, HI 




256 


33, 


362 


4, IV 


1 86 


7, XV 




258 


24, 


363 


i, V 


1 88 


5, XV 







18, XV 


364 


19, IV 


189 


3, VI 




259 


10, VI 


365 


13, 


191 


6, XV 




261 


16, XV 


366 


5, XVII 


192 


12, VI 




263 


2, VI 


367 


14, XVIII 


193 


2, XV 




264 


n, VI 


368 


26, XVII 


194 


14, HI 




269 





369 


71, IV 


195 


10, XV 




270 





370 


17, V 


196 


21, XII 




271 


15, XV 


372 


17, IV 


198 


i, XV 




273 


14, '> 


374 


45, V 


199 


26, XI 




275 


ii, 


375 


9, 


200 


15, VI 




276 


ii, 




5, XVIII 


201 


9, VIII 




284 


186 


376 


42, V 


2O2 


19, VIII 




285 


185 


377 


3i, 


203 


7, XIV 




286 


187 


379 


5, XVI 


204 


13, VI 




294 


n, XV 


380 


29, XVII 


205 


14, XIV 




296 


u, VI 


38i 


25, 


208 


8, VI 




304 





384 


53, IV 


209 


4, XV 




311 


13, XV 


385 


46, 


2IO 


13, VI 




3'3 


ii, VI 


386 


68, 


214 


15, VIII 




3H 





387 


38, 


215 


ii, XI 




316 


17, XV 


388 


33, 


216 


4, XIV 




317 


9, VI 


390 


ii, XVI 


217 


13, VI 




3i8 


n, VI 


391 


3, XVIII 


221 


36, III 




319 


18, III 


393 


60, IV 


222 


15, HI 




322 


14, VI 


394 


12, XVI 


223 


3, HI 




325 


21, III 


395 


21, XVII 



Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 




No. 

of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


84396 


10, XVII 




84462 


33, XX 


84528 


17, XXI 


397 


4, 




463 


10, XXII 


530 


18, XVII 


398 


41, IV 




465 


40, III 


53i 


3, XIX 


399 


22, XVII 




466 


9, 


533 


5, XXI 


400 


2, 




467 


12, XXII 


535 


14, XVII 


401 


35, IV 




470 


i, III 


539 


3i, XX 


43 


30, 




471 


i, 


54 


52, XXI 


406 


43, 




473 


15, XXII 


541 


13, 


407 


22, 




474 


ii, 


542 


27, XX 


408 


6 9) ' 




475 


6, 


543 


48, XXI 


409 


42, 




476 


2, 


546 


41, 


410 


47- 




477 


3, 


547 


59, 


413 


55, 




478 


9- 


55 


38, 


414 


52, 




479 


13, 


552 


12, X 


415 


30, XVIII 




480 


23, III 


554 


54, XXI 


416 


I, 




484 


19, XXI 


555 


8, 


417 


65, IV 




485 


i, XXII 


556 


36, V 


418 


57, 




486 


7, 


557 


18, XXI 


421 


17, XVII 




487 


20, XV 


558 


3i, 


422 


49, IV 




488 


26, XXI 


559 


3, 


423 


6, XVIII 




489 


16, XXII 


56o 


35, 


424 


24, IV 




490 


8, 


562 


7, 


425 


20, XVII 




492 


16, XVII 


563 


5, X 


426 


26, XVIII 




493 


49, XXI 


564 


6, XIX 


427 


7, XVII 




495 


32, XXI 


565 


14, XX 


428 


5, IV 




496 


8, XX 


566 


15, 


429 


19, XVII 




497 


50, XXI 


567 


i, 


43 


28, XVIII 




498 


5i, 


569 


18, XIX 


431 


4, 




499 


29, XX 


570 


4, " 


432 


ii, XVII 




500 


16, 


571 


19, 


435 


48, V 




5i 


8, XIX 


572 


6, XX 


436 


10, IV 




503 


44, XXI 


573 


10, 


437 


29, III 




5<>4 


43, 


574 


46, XXI 


438 


40, 




505 


55, 


575 


ii, XX 


439 


4, XXII 




506 


30, 


576 


10, XIX 


440 


10, III 




57 


47, 


577 


21, XX 


441 


24, XVIII 




508 


12, XIX 


578 . 


18, 


442 


27, HI 




509 


40, XXI 


579 


7> X 


443 


40, 




51 


4, XX 


580 


33, XXI 


445 


28, XXI 




5H 


26, X 


58i 


36, 


446 


23, 




5" 


6, XXI 


582 


4, 


447 


25, 




5'3 


22, XX 


583 


23, XX 


448 


i, III 




5'4 


16, XXI 


584 


10, XXI 


449 


21, XXI 




5'7 


7, XX 


585 


26, XX 


45 


22, 




5i8 


58, XXI 


586 


12, XXI 


451 


14. XXII 




519 


i, 


587 


5, XX 


45 2 


3, XX 




520 


12, XX 


594 


8, XIII 


454 


5, XXII 




5 2 i 


17; 


850* 


1939* 


455 


24, XXI 




522 


19, 


88 1 


9, XXI 


458 


27, 




523 


2, XXI 


85175* 


1939* 


459 


20, 




524 


56, 


868 


1981 


461 


ii, III 




527 


7, XIX 


870 






Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


of invent. 


of catalog. 


of invent. 


of catalog. 


of invent. 


of catalog. 


85872 


1981 


00591 


1481 


111484 


1434 


885 


1990 


602 


1863 


494* 


959* 


86060 


1989 


663 


810 


495 


815 


467 


1982 


666 


203 


697 


1550 


497 


1988 


770 


1577 


698* 


1560* 


65s 


5, XXV 


834 


1868 


701 


818 


654 


6, 


841* 


1886* 


751 


1544 


6 5 5 


3, ** 


872 


1077 


783* 


1928* 


687 


4, 


873 


1079 


786* 


1863* 


109288 


574 


880 


153 


799* 


1614* 


327* 


778* 


892 


1016 


800 


699 


331* 


1876* 


924* 


1824* 


971 


1 200 


34i* 


1608* 


111048 


1694 


112213 


1202 


354* 


1571* 


49* 


1555* 


217 


Il63 


355* 


1558* 


5 o* 


1780* 


222 


1344 


360* 


1608* 


55* 


1708* 


283 


1308 


361* 


i56i* 


70 


54 


284 


202 


362* 


1573* 


80 


1694 


285 


1336 


370 


1304 


149* 


1881* 


286 


1342 


37i 


177 


209 


1329 


472 


60, V 


494* 


1618* 


2IO 


1292 


496* 


449* 


507 


1599 


211 


1398 


507 


1 195 


5i6 


973 


213 


1404 


521 


1156 


523* 


1881* 


214 


1406 


526* 


1848* 


578* 


1928* 


252 


I2OI 


778* 


442* 


579* 


* 


383 


1856 


841* 


1501* 


608 


1325 


385 


1107 


842* 


1502* 


6n 


1081 


386 


975 


850 


H75 


621 


H3 


389 


1078 


II3035* 


1859* 


634* 


1848* 


39' 


1080 


197 


1343 


678 


155 


392 


548 


2O6 


3i, HI 


679 


i59 


396* 


1843* 


207 


31, HI 


687 


160 


399 


1076 


223* 


1855* 


688 


1880 


425 


18, X 


257 


1572 


703 


1730 


434 


"95 


2 5 8 


1576 


75 1 


1290 


436 


1260 


259 


1574 


833* 


1900* 


437 


1324 


398 


1203 


905* 


1824* 


439 


1312 


529 


223 


982 


163 


440 


1287 


576* 


1862* 


110004 


537 


441 


1320 


808* 


1854* 


5 


538 


442 


1428 


114248* 


1863* 


119 


1848 


47i 


1261 


254* 


1928* 


127 


963 


472 


1309 


280 


194 


223* 


1830* 


473 


1298 


281 


173 


338 


442 


474 


1294 


282 


176 


34 





475 


1296 


320 


1291 


501 


1848 


476 


1293 


321 


1288 


Si' 


61, V 


477 


1372 


322 


1285 


543* 


1614* 


479 


1349 


562* 


1928* 


565 


642 


480 


1408 


563* 





568 


1911 


481 


HIS 


567* 





590 


1480 


482 


1809 


5 8i* 






Index of numbers of catalogue and inventory 



223 



No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


No. 
of invent. 


No. 
of catalog. 


114582* 


1928* 


120086 


1328 


125187* 


1708* 


636* 


1832* 


129 


532 


196 


6, XVI 


938* 


1852* 


175 


533 


212 


12, XVIII 


115096* 


1830* 


177 


1 88 


228 


23, 


389 


1238 


270* 


1553* 


348 


834 


39 


800 


301* 


1865* 


355 


16, III 


39i 


80 1 


303* 


1863* 


489 


8, XV 


396 


1440 . 


424 


978 


709 


1877 


397 


1267 


619 


174 


712 


1877 


398 


1396 


355* 


1939* 


126170 


808 


399 


1327 


462 


1591 


172 


1691 


474* 


1928* 


522 


38 


174 


128 


553* 


1562* 


523 


9 


248 


1873 


116066 


23, IV 


594* 


449* 


249 


1924 


68 


4, X 


857 


1737 


255 


458 


85 


1284 


123245 


715 


129181 


96 


325-328 


1912 


248 


716 


337 


28, XV 


356* 


1879* 


255 


717 


874 


1239 


363* 


1888* 


260 


718 


130527 


5, VI 


407* 


I55i* 


261 


719 


131036* 


1865* 


662* 


45>* 


263 


720 


59 


26, XV 


663* 


449* 


264 


721 


152 


45, IV 


664* 


442* 


270' 


722 


153 


54, 


856 


17, X 


921* 


1959* 


160 


4, XII 


983* 


442* 


923* 





2OQ 


136 a 


118192 


1671 


924* 





4l6 


3, XVI 


223 


175 


934* 


1863* 


417 


21, 


334* 


1941* 


953* 


1866* 


4 l8 


23, 


383* 


442* 


971* 


442* 


419 


IO, 


708* 


1830* 


124222 


1237 


420 


27, 


729* 


1829* 


320 


"57 


421 


20, 


734* 


1825* 


325 


291 


422 


14, 


741* 


18*4* 


406* 


1855* 


423 


34, 


996* 


1830* 


545 


189 


424 


7, 


H9348* 


1825* 


547 


7, HI 


425 


19, 


585 


1082 


666 


180 


426 


25, 


689 


1275 


668 


1859 


427 


28, 


690* 


1280* 


700 


1828 


428 


22, 


691 


1263 


701 


1843 


429 


30, 


917 


212 


708* 


1966* 


43 


31, 


920 


1908 


844* 


442* 


431 


32, 


937* 


449* 


845* 




432 


33, 


120029 


1812 


846* 


1823* 


433 


15. 


30 


1810 


906 


556 


434 


17, 


31 


1811 


912 


1726 


435 


18, 


32 


1262 


970* 


1830* 


436 


16, 


33 


1271 


125088* 


1830* 


437 


24, 


34 


1310 


121 


44, IV 


556 


20, XVIII 


85 


1326 


1 86* 


i559* 


557 


22, 



224 Index 

I N DEX*) 



Prefatory Note Page 3 

The National Museum 5 

GROUND FLOOR. 

Marble Statues: 

Vestibule 6 

Entrance Hall 6 

East Wing: 

Corridor of the Tyrannicides 12 

Hall of the Goddess of Victory 16 

Hall containing Objects from Locri 16 

Hall of Athena 17 

Hall of the Doryphorus 21 

Mosaics . . ' 22 

Marble Statues: 

Hall of the Athletes 26 

Corridor of the Flora 27 

Hall of the Farnese Bull 30 

Passage 39 

Hall of the Amazones 39 

Hall of the Venus Callipygus 42 

Egyptian Collection: 

Prefatory Remarks 43 

Room I 45 

SASEMENT. 

Second Room 47 

Third Room 47 

Fourth Room 47 

Fifth Room 48 

Sixth Room 48 

Terracottas: 

Room I 49 

Room II . 50 

The Prehistoric Collection: 

First Room 51 

Second Room . . , 51 

GROUND FLOOR. 

Marble Statues: 

Hall of the Pallas 51 

Hall of Cupid with the Dolphin 52 

Hall of the Scylla . 53 

Hall of the Atlas 55 

Hall of the Zeus 56 

Corridor of the Coloured Marble Statues .... 57 

Garden 59 



* This inventory is only approximately complete, as in almost every 
room there are objects used chiefly for decorative purposes, which have 
nothing to do with the collections for which the rooms are specially in- 
tended. 



Inde> 



West Wing: 
The Bronzes: 

Corridor of the Bronze Horse Page 60 

Corridor of the Antinous 61 

Large Bronzes Room I 6 ? 

Room II 64 

Room III 6s 

Room IV 67 

Room V 68 

Room of the Isis l 

Room of the Pompeian Temples . . 7 2 

Room of the large Bronze Fragments 7^ 

Marble Statues: 

Corridor of the Antinous 73 

Hall of the Great Mosaic .... .... 74 

Hall of the Flavians .... ...... 76 

Hall of Tiberius 76 

Hall of Antoninus Pius 77 

Hall of the Roman Busts 79 

Portico of the Antinous So 

Corridor of Homer Si 

Rooms of the Inscriptions 

Marble Statues: 

Courtyard ^5 

On the Central Staircase $5 

MEZZANINQ. 

Campanian Wall Paintings: 

First Corridor 86 

First Room 87 

Second Room 92 

Second Corridor ... . 93 

Third Corridor 94 

Third Room 96 

P'ourth Room 9 8 

Fifth Room ' ........ 100 

Sixt Room 103 

Marble Statues: 

Central Staircase 103 

FIRST FLOOR East Wing. 

The Collection of Small Bronzes: 

First Room i4 

Second Room 107 

Third Room . 109 

Fourth Room 109 

Fifth Room no 

Sixt Room > in 

Seventh Room 112 

Passage from Room III. to the Landing.- ... 113 
Wall Paintings etc. 

Room of the Small Busts . . . 113 

Room containing Articles of food and paints . . 114 

TOP FLOOR. 

Majolicas i'5 



1 Index 

Glass Rooms: 

First Room . . P<Jge 117 

Second Room 118 

Rooms of the Precious Metals: 

Gold Room 1 18 

Silver Room 120 

Armoury ' 122 

Collection of Papyri 124 

.Collection of Coins 128 

Engraved Stones 132 

Collection of Vases: 

Prefatory Remarks 134 

Figured Vases 135 

The Cumae Collection: 

First Room . . . ' 141 

Second Room 142 

Third Room 143 

The Stevens Collection 143 

The Santangelo Collection: 

Principal Room 144 

Side Room 145 

Collection of Coins . . . ' 145 

FJkST FLOOR West Wing. 

The Picture Gallery: 

Vestibule 146 

Room I.: Tapestries by Bernhard van Orley . . 146 

Room II.: Tapestries by Bernhard van Orlej . . 146 

Room 111 : Andrea Salerno 149 

Room IV.: Neapolitan Schools, XVI. and XVII. 

centuries 152 

Room V.: Neapolitan Schools, XVII. and XVIII. 

centuries 157 

Room VI.: Italian Masters, XV. and XVI. cent. 159 

Room VII.: School of Bologna 162 

Room VIII.: Italian Schools, XVI. and XVII. 

centuries 167 

Room IX.: Pannini 172 

Room X : Prince Farnese . . 174 

Room XI.: Schools of Ferrara and Parma ... 176 

Koom XII.: Correggio and Parmigianino ... 178 

Room XIII.: Titian iSo 

Room XIV.: Raffael 183 

Room XV.i Tuscan and Venetian Schools, XIV. 

century i8s 

Room XVI.: Solimena and De Mura 188 

Room XVII.: Ribera and Stanzioni 189 

Room XVIII.: Salvator Rosa 191 

Room XIX.: Velasquez 194 

Room XX.: Foreign Schools, XVI-XVUI. cents. 196 

Room XXI.: Foreign Schools, XV1-XVIII. cent. 197 

Room XXII.: Room of Brueghel 200 

Room XXIII.: Tapestry Room 202 

Room XXIV.: Room of small Bronzes .... 203 

Room XXV. Drawing Room "205 

Index of number of catalogue and inventory . . 207 



GROUND FLOOR 




250-256 



I JL J 27 1 J 




500-530 



BASEMENT 




MEZZANINO 




TOP FLOOR 





T" 

1932 1 


1 


U 1 


1938 
^UJl 1^,6-22 
20^3 1 2023-30 


2023-8 

^HM 


r 

4 

1 

n' 


3 

iMirl 

1909-42^ 
1954- J 

1951 1 


1 

1893-1909 


1 1910-191* 1915 1952-1953 
1929-1931 1 1928 1 1964-1977 










"1, 






1875-1892 








I98V-87 




1955-61 
1961 J 


1858-18"K 








1988-96 




1957J 
1961J 


1842-1857 








1997 
2OO6 




1953 J 


1828-184-1 








2007-K 


-.' 


19*9 1 

ssJ 


1817 1 
1827 L 






1 1 


I 1M 


i 1_ ^ 

194-3- el 


1 



FIRST FLOOR 




GETTY CENTER LIBR 



3 3125 00085 2828